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  1.    #1  
    They first intended this to be a consumer device, see CES 2010. Then, the iPad.

    New plan.

    The Slate is resurrected as an enterprise device. One problem, it's been tried many times before... BY THEM! It failed every time. What's new?

    It seems that the businesses they hope to target with this thing are already shifting to the iPad. Many businesses have been running pilot programs for the iPad, and they have been quite successful. It turns out they can do all the things they need to do on a slate-like device without all of the bloat of Windows.

    Speaking of Windows, it still has not been optimized or skinned for small, touchscreen use. The reason Engadget suggested for this oversight is that, "It's for business, not consumers." If this is their business strategy, don't expect to see a wOS tablet push in the business arena.

    Oh, and it's $800.

    They bought Palm. Do they have any money left over to buy a clue?
    Last edited by dandbj13; 10/21/2010 at 07:49 PM.
  2. elslunko's Avatar
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    #2  
    What business did they develop the Slate for? According to them.
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    They bought Palm. Do they have any money left over to buy a clue?
    ROFL

    Honestly though, they may have a shot in the business market. As a consumer, I think the slate is just a bad product. I don't think I'd even give it a shot. However, there are many "Windows-Only" businesses out there and that could give HP an advantage. If a company can get most of their standard software running on this device and can reuse much of their support structure, they may opt for this.

    Not saying it "will" happen, but I don't think it's necessarily a bad strategy.

    Also, just because they failed at it before, does not mean they absolutely should not try again. The original MacBook Air didn't do that well. Steve Jobs said AppleTV failed because people don't want another box. Still, Apple has newer versions of both products.

    While I'd prefer an iPad over the HP Slate, I wouldn't be too upset if I worked for a company that issued me a Slate for meetings and other mobile activities (where you'd normally undock your laptop and take it with you).
  4. #4  
    If it was higher resolution than 1024x600 I'd be very interested, even at $800.

    I've made my opinion on this clear on other threads, but the pen makes it useful for me, and I'd gladly replace my aging TC1100 with it.

    Though, Engadget reports it's a Wacom digitizer, I'm not sure I fully believe that yet. I'd lean more towards it being an N-trig one.
  5.    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by taharka View Post
    If a company can get most of their standard software running on this device and can reuse much of their support structure, they may opt for this.
    The problem is they do not have any software optimized for an 8" touchscreen. Just because they can get it to boot up, does not mean it makes sense on that form-factor. They will not save any money on training and retooling with this over an iPad or wOS pad

    Also, just because they failed at it before, does not mean they absolutely should not try again. The original MacBook Air didn't do that well. Steve Jobs said AppleTV failed because people don't want another box. Still, Apple has newer versions of both products.
    Insanity is doing the same thing repeatedly, while expecting a different result each time. Apple retooled the MBA and significantly shrunk the price. Same with the TV. They still may fail, but not by doing the same thing. HP has done nothing, as far as I can tell, to fix the underlying problem.

    Don't forget, HP failed during a time when there was no competition in the space. They are going at this as if they were still the only game in town. That is a bad sign. We shall see.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    The problem is they do not have any software optimized for an 8" touchscreen. Just because they can get it to boot up, does not mean it makes sense on that form-factor. They will not save any money on training and retooling with this over an iPad or wOS pad
    I don't know. It's still windows. I see people using regular windows software on netbooks all the time. I think there are some possibilities there.

    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    Insanity is doing the same thing repeatedly, while expecting a different result each time. Apple retooled the MBA and significantly shrunk the price. Same with the TV. They still may fail, but not by doing the same thing. HP has done nothing, as far as I can tell, to fix the underlying problem.

    Don't forget, HP failed during a time when there was no competition in the space. They are going at this as if they were still the only game in town. That is a bad sign. We shall see.
    Sure. But to be fair, you can't really say HP is doing the exact same thing here while giving Apple credit for "retooling" the same products. In the case of appletv, Jobs' solution to people not wanting to buy a box, is to try and sell them a different box. Maybe both companies are insane.

    While I don't think it's the product for me, I agree with jhoff80. If this were "assigned" to me at work and I can use it (with a pen) for note taking in meetings (my main reason for considering the tablet form-factor) along with other stuff, I wouldn't mind.
  7.    #7  
    OK. I wouldn't quit my job just because I was handed one of these either. But for running Windows, I would much rather be handed a laptop, a yellow pad, and a box of ink pens. The underlying problem with Windows on a tablet is, and has always been that Windows was not made, or thought out for a tablet.

    I can use my iPad as a third monitor. Yes, there's an app for that. I can assure you, if you've never tried it, it just doesn't make sense. Everything is too small, including the targets you have to hit with your fingers. MacOS is no better than Windows on a tablet. You will get the best milage by using a keyboard, mouse, and stylus. It can be done, but why? Why not use Windows on a tool it was made for, and use tablets with tools that were made for them? If I was an Enterprise, IT manager, that is what I would be asking?
  8. crg28's Avatar
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    #8  
    My brother works for a large Pharma co and they have been testing the Slate 500 for 3 months now. He says they are using it for their Pharma Sales reps with custom software....they are very happy with it as I'm sure a lot of other big businesses will be too.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    OK. I wouldn't quit my job just because I was handed one of these either. But for running Windows, I would much rather be handed a laptop, a yellow pad, and a box of ink pens.
    This is what I have now. Unfortunately as a software architect, my meetings tend to involve lots of sketches. I often wish I could just send these draft sketches to the attendees after the fact without all the scanning/redoing that must happen when paper is involved.

    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    The underlying problem with Windows on a tablet is, and has always been that Windows was not made, or thought out for a tablet[...]it just doesn't make sense. Everything is too small, including the targets you have to hit with your fingers. MacOS is no better than Windows on a tablet.
    No argument there. There is another thread on the slate and I mentioned the same thing there. Desktop OSes are simply not "finger friendly" and thus not tablet-friendly IMO.

    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    It can be done, but why? Why not use Windows on a tool it was made for, and use tablets with tools that were made for them? If I was an Enterprise, IT manager, that is what I would be asking?
    You'd also have to ask questions around product familiarity and compatibility with existing infrastructure. I believe this is what HP is banking on.

    Don't get me wrong here. Of the two, I personally believe the iPad is the better product. But then again, I don't have to consider the needs/habits of tens, hundreds, even thousands of employees. In that scenario, the "better product" takes on a different meaning.
  10.    #10  
    Here is another take on the Slate from MobileBeat:

    The decision not to include the TouchSmart user interface, even on an enterprise device, was probably a bad one, since the Windows 7 interface is really meant for mouse-clicking. My finger was too thick to tap the small links on web pages, and I often had to hit the screen a couple of times before it would respond.
    Be sure to click on the link above for the full review.

    The above snippet is representative of the desktop on a slate experience. The problem is compounded when in the hands of people who can hardly run Windows on a desktop, compounded further by the fact that many of these people have, or have played with iPads and expect the Slate to work like that, compounded by the $800 price tag. That's a lot of compounding to overcome.

    For less than half that price, they could buy netbooks with a bigger scree, keyboard, and trackpad: Windows at its finest. No retooling or retraining required. If they are going to go down the road of custom software, why not get a less expensive pad and code your custom software for that. Writing custom software gives up a big benefit of using a Windows device which is using the same software on any machine.

    I suspect this will be a much tougher sell than before because people now have higher expectations for these devices, and those expectations have nothing to do with desktop OSs.

    I was also counting on HP pushing wOS to the enterprise. It will be harder to make that pitch, now. Windows at work, wOS at home? What about the phones? Will they not be pushed to the enterprise market? If so, why not pads? Will they push both and compete with themselves, mixing their messages? Will the wOS pad be just a toy for playing ported iPad apps? The iPad is penetrating all markets. The wOS pad has to have a chance to do the same, or it has no hope for mass appeal. I don't like the direction this is going.
  11.    #11  
    Watching the video, I was struck by a couple of odd design decisions. The USB is on the top-center of the device. I don't think a cord plugged in at the top of something you are holding makes much sense. It is as if that was the only place left where they hadn't drilled a hole.

    Second, the camera is in the extreme top-left corner of the screen. I guess the USB already had dibs on the center. To use it, you will have to hold it, or yourself at an odd angle, or appear off-center to the person you are chatting with.

    Finally, the power button seemed to be in an easy place to accidentally press. I'm guessing they had to use a hardware keyboard button because unmodified Windows would not trigger a software keyboard when tapping in text fields. Let's hope a different department is designing the PalmPad.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    Watching the video, I was struck by a couple of odd design decisions. The USB is on the top-center of the device. I don't think a cord plugged in at the top of something you are holding makes much sense. It is as if that was the only place left where they hadn't drilled a hole.
    Windows can rotate in all four directions, so it's not always going to be the top center.

    Finally, the power button seemed to be in an easy place to accidentally press.
    One of the detailed videos I've shown said it's a power slider, so you have to hold it a little for it to turn on or off.

    I'm guessing they had to use a hardware keyboard button because unmodified Windows would not trigger a software keyboard when tapping in text fields. Let's hope a different department is designing the PalmPad.
    Pretty much all apps trigger the software keyboard when tapping in text fields unless they use a custom control. (Admittedly it didn't work in Firefox's awesome bar until recently.) However, there's reasons to use a keyboard besides when in a text field. For example, if you're using Photoshop and know the keyboard shortcuts really well (which a lot of heavy Photoshop users do) you can just trigger the keyboard where you're at and then go back to what you're doing, without having to press on a text field to show it.

    Edit: Also... 64GB SSD? Cut that in half and take off $150 or so and that'd help. But mainly I'd definitely pay $800 if it wasn't for the low resolution.
    Last edited by jhoff80; 10/21/2010 at 10:01 PM.
  13. #13  
    This is a nice tablet, I like it. The two things I'm not sure about are the weight and the battery live. But I still may get this. $800 is a good price for this well speced tablet. Also the company I work for allows it's employees to purchase personal computer and other electronic devices from Dell and HP at a discount. So if I do buy the Slate, I will be paying less than $800.

    Edit: I'm trying to wait until March, 2011 before I buy ANY tablet.
  14. #14  
    my core i3, 4gb ram HP tm2 does the same thing and more for the same $799.

    but im excited about a webos tablet
    @agentmock

    Audiovox SMT5600 (WM) --> Cingular 8125 (WM) --> Sprint Mogul 8525 (WM) --> Palm Pre (webOS)- --> Sprint Franken Pre2 (webOS) + 32gb Touchpad (webOS)
  15. #15  
    HP can't put out a slate that competes with the specs and form factor with the iPad simply because of the windows licensing they have to pay. Not to mention there's basically no infrastructure to generate ongoing revenue streams (ie the iOS app catalogue).

    Enter WebOS as the necessary critical component that makes these types of devices financially feasible. Carrying on that line of thought, it really explains why HP is so hot to drop this OS on every device out there since they can get all the features of a full legitimate OS for free. The sort of integration and licensing they'd have to endure under MS would add up fast.
  16. #16  
    USB top center is for plugging a scanner in - or similar test or data connections.

    This location seems strange for a consumer device, but perfect for an enterprise device.
  17. #17  
    I would like to say to the people that feel like their is no market for a slate that runs windows is that when I was at a hospital recently many or the staff had a slate style device that had windows on it.
  18.    #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by balkeee View Post
    I would like to say to the people that feel like their is no market for a slate that runs windows is that when I was at a hospital recently many or the staff had a slate style device that had windows on it.
    You might want to look at this. It is not Windows hospitals want, it is convenience. Those legacy devices are being replaced by iPads at a rapid pace. Windows on a slate is no longer the only option for convenience. That ship has sailed.
  19. #19  
    that's some good info, thanks dandbj13. I am still standing behind my statement, this new hp slate is a few steps above the ipad in my opinion and I believe it has a place in the healthcare market due to it's power to do much more than just show people pictures and study with like that article suggests.
  20. #20  
    800$

    That has failure written all over it. Did I mention i still want one? Ill buy it when its half off. Hehe.
    Last edited by Klownicle; 10/22/2010 at 07:36 AM.
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