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  1. #61  
    Quote Originally Posted by crg28 View Post
    My brother works for a large Pharma co and they have been testing the Slate 500 for 3 months now. He says they are using it for their Pharma Sales reps with custom software....they are very happy with it as I'm sure a lot of other big businesses will be too.
    My doctor's office uses a previous generation of Windows tablets and they would probably see a cost savings switching to these when new hardware is needed. The staff is used to using a stylus with the existing hardware, so they would probably continue doing so.

    On the custom software side of things it would also be nicer for developers of these types of apps: no revenue sharing with Apple and no review process to slow things down. The software cost for some of these uses is often several times more than the hardware, so I doubt they would want to share 30% of that with Apple.
  2. #62  
    Got one here to try for work, and for the most part does its job. I think they under powered it a bit with the Atom processor, but the SSD in it along with other parts give it good battery life. I have done quite a few things on the device, and it works well switching between touch and pen input (N-Trig software). It is super fast to boot up, light to carry, and stays fairly cool. I had to bump the processsor up a bit from scaling so low sometimes. Only time it got hot was with Active cooling at 1.86 Ghz using WiFi to Skype.

    Worth the $800??? Maybe for most and for businesses...I am going to wait for the HP webOS slate myself.


    Nokia (red phone) --> Denso TouchPoint TP2200 --> Samsung SPH-N400 --> (Palm VII) --> Sanyo 5150 --> Palm Treo 650 --> Palm Pre --> Sprint FrankenPre 2 --> (HP TouchPad)/(HP Pre 3 - Wifi) --> Galaxy Nexus (with TS mod and hopes of Open webOS!)
  3. #63  
    One of the things we've run into when it comes to supporting iOS devices at my company is that we cannot freely deploy (without putting it in the app store) our internal apps to our people. Why? Because some of them are contractors and there is a stipulation from Apple that says we can only bypass the app store if we deploy to "employees". So, now we are forced to go "mobile web" if we want to provide some of the functionality for iOS users.

    I don't know if there are such restrictions for a windows tablet but we haven't run into that issue with RIM or Android.

    The iPad is great, but "iPad != 42".
  4.    #64  
    For the sake of fairness, and interesting reading, Macworld has put up another article suggesting that the Slate is a different animal from the iPad, and should not be compared.

    I find myself agreeing with the conclusion that the slate is not a child of vision, but of metooism. They felt like they had to do it. They couldn't kill off their relationship with MS, which canceling the Slate would have probably damaged. And, they couldn't just let Apple start eating into the business market unchallenged.
  5. #65  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    And, they couldn't just let Apple start eating into the business market unchallenged.
    I don't get why that's a bad thing. What company would want to just sit by and let someone else go unchallenged in a market that they target? It's almost like you are criticizing them for "running a business".
  6.    #66  
    Quote Originally Posted by taharka View Post
    I don't get why that's a bad thing. What company would want to just sit by and let someone else go unchallenged in a market that they target? It's almost like you are criticizing them for "running a business".
    No, I am criticizing them for having no vision. They have been in this market forever, and have done nothing compelling in this space. Instead of going back to the drawing board, they are still doing nothing compelling in this space. This product is nothing more than a fit of jealousy and desperation, not vision and inspiration. That's worthy of some criticism.
  7. #67  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    No, I am criticizing them for having no vision. They have been in this market forever, and have done nothing compelling in this space. Instead of going back to the drawing board, they are still doing nothing compelling in this space. This product is nothing more than a fit of jealousy and desperation, not vision and inspiration. That's worthy of some criticism.
    You really believe that? I think it's a bit of a stretch. They are not exactly hurting or anything that would lead me to believe they are desperate. Jealousy I can understand. What company would not be jealous of another company's runaway success of a product? I think that's normal across the board.
  8. #68  
    Quote Originally Posted by NickDG View Post
    The biggest thing the Slate 500 brings to the table is a great price. Most of the current Windows tablets cost anywhere from 1500-2000 bucks. The Slate 500 undercuts these other models by a lot, which is going to make a lot of IT finance people happy.
    Except that this slate is more like a UMPC than an MS tablet. MS Tablets have large hard drives, multi-core CPUs, usually have keyboards that fold out of the way, and higher resolution screens like this HP TouchSmart for $29 more than the anemic HP slate. The HP slate is competing against Archos 9 ($499), the Viliv S5 ($699), or the ASUS Eee PC T91 ($400) and it sure isn't winning on price.
  9. #69  
    Quote Originally Posted by oobernuber View Post
    Unfortunately, I haven't seen anything about the Slate's battery life. That's a biggy for me.

    According to Engadget, the CULV processors are a huge plus for this line. Heat and battery life are greatly improved.

    Since I don't have a laptop, I liked the idea of carrying my laptop and electronic notebook in one package. Now I'm thinking I could just throw in an attachable keyboard to have when needed. Slimming down the package I have to hold when taking notes sounds pretty nice.

    Since my TM2 is still in production, I'm really wondering if I can tell them to stop and build me a Slate. The Slate would also be about $50 cheaper than my configured TM2. I had an earlier netbook and it ran Win7 Ultimate and office programs ok on a slower atom chip.

    Tough decision.
    Today I found a deal for T91 from Asus on Amazon

    Amazon.com: Asus Eee PC T91SA-VU1X-BK 8.9-Inch Intel Atom Netbook Computer (Black): Electronics: Reviews, Prices & more

    The reviews on this device are pretty good and it does not have the following

    - Windows 7 Professional
    - 1.86 GHz later gen atom processor
    - 2 Gb of RAM
    - 64 GB of SSD
    - digitizer (although it does have the stylus it is not as good)
    - dock with extra ports and HDMI
  10. #70  
    Quote Originally Posted by sapient2k7 View Post
    - digitizer (although it does have the stylus it is not as good)
    That Asus resistive touch, which means for pen use, it's absolute crap. And I'm not a fan of resistive touch for finger use either, though some do prefer it.
    Last edited by jhoff80; 10/25/2010 at 07:17 PM.
  11. #71  
    It cost less gear toward enterprise then the MBA 11" cost geared toward consumers. That's got to count for something right?
  12. #72  
    Quote Originally Posted by DJeremyC View Post
    Got one here to try for work, and for the most part does its job. I think they under powered it a bit with the Atom processor, but the SSD in it along with other parts give it good battery life. I have done quite a few things on the device, and it works well switching between touch and pen input (N-Trig software). It is super fast to boot up, light to carry, and stays fairly cool. I had to bump the processsor up a bit from scaling so low sometimes. Only time it got hot was with Active cooling at 1.86 Ghz using WiFi to Skype.

    Worth the $800??? Maybe for most and for businesses...I am going to wait for the HP webOS slate myself.
    Not sure if you still have access to it, but if you (or anyone else does) I'd love to have an answer to two unknowns:

    1.) N-Trig has technology for an active digitizer with a battery-powered pen, and a battery-less one. From the thickness of the pen in pictures, people have speculated (on other forums) that it might be the battery-powered one. Any idea of that?

    2.) If you still have access to it, I'd love to know if it has a N-Trig Control Panel page that has "Pen Only", "Touch Only", "Dual mode", and "Auto mode" settings. My Dell XT is powered by an N-Trig digitizer and I really love auto mode myself, which lets me turn the touch control on with a double tap, and turn the touch off by bringing the pen to the screen. It removes any possibility of issues between the pen and touch.
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