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  1. #41  
    Quote Originally Posted by oobernuber View Post
    I just ordered a TM2t, and I'm wondering if I should tell HP I want the Slate instead. What do you think?

    The main reason I bought the TM2 is because I need a laptop (no portable computing for me right now), and I want to have a tablet with pen input (I don't understand how this isn't a requirement for Win7 tablets...). This setup with OneNote2010 will be a huge bag of win for me.

    Anybody know anything about the battery life?
    I was interested in the TM2 as well until sep of last year when a friend of mine got it and found it gets too hot, is bulky, heavy (not easy to do one handed operations ~4 lbs weight) and not as responsive as I would have liked.

    Battery life according to my friend was in 2-3 hr range but that was an older model not with intel CULV.

    Of course this years model may be better but I would test drive one before buying it. Slate 500's formfactor and weight makes it much easy to use IMHO based on my use of ipad which has similar dimensions. Use of atom should remove the heating issue completely as well.
  2. #42  
    Unfortunately, I haven't seen anything about the Slate's battery life. That's a biggy for me.

    According to Engadget, the CULV processors are a huge plus for this line. Heat and battery life are greatly improved.

    Since I don't have a laptop, I liked the idea of carrying my laptop and electronic notebook in one package. Now I'm thinking I could just throw in an attachable keyboard to have when needed. Slimming down the package I have to hold when taking notes sounds pretty nice.

    Since my TM2 is still in production, I'm really wondering if I can tell them to stop and build me a Slate. The Slate would also be about $50 cheaper than my configured TM2. I had an earlier netbook and it ran Win7 Ultimate and office programs ok on a slower atom chip.

    Tough decision.
    "...human sacrifices, dogs and cats living together! MASS HYSTERIA!"

    -Ghostbusters
  3. #43  
    Yeah that was my experience too i.e. 1.66 GHz atom ran most programs just fine. It was not a serious gaming device but it was fine with flash games and most older games (I have a gog account). With broadcom crystal accelerator the choppiness of the flash issue has been fixed in the slate. I would suggest going to bestbuy or circuitcity where they sell the TM2 and get a hands-on.

    Slate is rated at ~5 hours and from my experience with Atom based devices that might not be too far off (especially since it is a non replaceable battery which is typically a much better quality)

    TM2 is rated at about the same, slate will have a dock that you can put it into to charge or use with an external keyboard/mouse tm2 will change into a laptop if needed .... choices... choices
  4. #44  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    Marketing the slate for business use is code for:
    • We know you need to buy something that the IT department isn't going to freak out over
    • You've probably got legacy Windows applications out the wazoo so you've got to find a compatible slate
    • This isn't a device that most users would buy for themselves but if you deploy it then they are going to have to use it.
    Enterprises with internally developed software may find this slate attractive if their software can be used successfully on a device with such a small screen. OTOH this isn't the first Windows tablet and previous Windows tablets were not too successful. Companies whose systems have N-Tier architectures may prefer to develop an iPad client.
  5. #45  
    My company currently uses convertible tablets at the moment in our creative groups. The Slate 500 could easily replace them and it is way cheaper than the current convertible tablets we are using.

    HP has a strategy here. This tablet is meant for business use. The palmpad will be their iPad competitor.
    Palm Vx -> Treo 600 -> Treo 700p -> Centro -> Pre (Launch Phone 06/06/09) -> AT&T Pre Plus with Sprint EVDO swap -> Samsung Epic 4G w/ Froyo
  6.    #46  
    I keep hearing that this thing is for business. So what? So has every tablet before the iPad. What I want to know is what's changed. Why would the Slate be more desirable now than before?
  7. #47  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    I keep hearing that this thing is for business. So what? So has every tablet before the iPad. What I want to know is what's changed. Why would the Slate be more desirable now than before?
    Correct. This is just the next iteration of a Microsoft Windows Tablet PC or the UMPC. The only real difference is it uses Windows 7 instead of XP. My ASUS EEE PC T91 is a convertible Tablet PC that is netbook sized (9" screen) and relies on Windows 7's pen input extensions. While it can do everything any other netbook can do and weights just 2 pounds, it's still as painful to use the Pen (or finger) with the windows interface as it ever was.


    ...but you can buy it for $500 less than the HP model.
  8. #48  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    The difference between the HP Slate and the iPad is that while there are plenty of people here that say things like "this could be useful" or "if I were to buy something like this..." or "businesses like healthcare would be interested in this", nobody, yet, has said that they are going to line up at the HP store to get one.

    There are tons of people on this forum who have iPads, though. I'm waiting for the first person to say that they preordered the Slate or will definitely be buying one. After all, this is ultimately an HP subsidiary fan site. Who's laying down cash for this? Anyone?
    I did today. I bought it the very first opportunity I had. I had an iPad, kept it for two days and returned it, very unsatisfied. I really don't understand the constant bashing of the HP slate. No one on this forum has one, tested one, or even held one, so how in the name of everything that's holy, can you say it's deficient in any way. Why don't you naysayers buy one, test it out, and then give your magnificent opinions. People living under the iPad cloud must find it very dark and mysterious when coming out of that cloud.
  9. #49  
    finally - someone that's buying the HP slate. Any other takers?
  10. #50  
    I would buy it in a heart beat
    (i.e. I have determined to buy one)

    I have access to an iPad, and I think the iPad is fantastic!!

    The slate weighs the same as an iPad and has superior computing capabilities in terms of hardware and a more flexible operating environment.

    It comes with a dock, so I can use a blue tooth keyboard and mouse or an IR keyboard and bluetooth

    i.e. It can be the laptop/netbook I was in the market for.


    I can install Chrome, Firefox or Safari (the real thing).

    I can use Google Docs in it's intended full glory and have access to all web applications in their full glory.

    It has a front and back cameras, so I can google talk with video Yahoo chat IRC Skype

    I can watch Youtube, HULU, Netflix e.t.c

    I can use VLC, winAmp e.t.c

    I can read all the eBooks I want, I can install Windows Office ( I already have license), Adobe Professional, Fox Reader.

    I can use it to write apps for webOS.

    I can look for a Windows 7 theme that enlarges the Start Menu, and application menubars if they are too small.

    I can do all these things till I run out of local space, but then I can map my network drives and can also use Cloud storage from Zumodrive, dropbox e.t.c

    Plus I can run additional things from a USB drive i.e. LiveOS... think Meego.

    I can compute with fewer limits and with more freedom doing most of what I already do plus Windows is also evolving.
  11. #51  
    Additionally, it is portable, noiseless (SSD) and it costs only $799 with an almost zero accessory(comes with a case) / third-party app costs.

    I believe it is more competitively priced than the iPad considering the hardware specs, the digitizer, dock and the case.

    I might also buy the webOS tablet when that comes out as well.


    Quote Originally Posted by DumbPreCommenter View Post
    I would buy it in a heart beat
    (i.e. I have determined to buy one)

    I have access to an iPad, and I think the iPad is fantastic!!

    The slate weighs the same as an iPad and has superior computing capabilities in terms of hardware and a more flexible operating environment.

    It comes with a dock, so I can use a blue tooth keyboard and mouse or an IR keyboard and bluetooth

    i.e. It can be the laptop/netbook I was in the market for.


    I can install Chrome, Firefox or Safari (the real thing).

    I can use Google Docs in it's intended full glory and have access to all web applications in their full glory.

    It has a front and back cameras, so I can google talk with video Yahoo chat IRC Skype

    I can watch Youtube, HULU, Netflix e.t.c

    I can use VLC, winAmp e.t.c

    I can read all the eBooks I want, I can install Windows Office ( I already have license), Adobe Professional, Fox Reader.

    I can use it to write apps for webOS.

    I can look for a Windows 7 theme that enlarges the Start Menu, and application menubars if they are too small.

    I can do all these things till I run out of local space, but then I can map my network drives and can also use Cloud storage from Zumodrive, dropbox e.t.c

    Plus I can run additional things from a USB drive i.e. LiveOS... think Meego.

    I can compute with fewer limits and with more freedom doing most of what I already do plus Windows is also evolving.
  12.    #52  
    DPC, you can do all that, and more, right now, for less. Just buy a cheap note/netbook, done!

    Want something more elegant, pick up a new MBA and run BootCamp. Now, you have a machine that runs Windows, Mac, and any other thing you want to throw at it. I fail to see how trying to resurrect the UMPC yet again, is supposed to work out better this time.

    All those things you mentioned can be done better with an already existing solution. Shrinking it to a screen smaller than a modern netbook and removing the keyboard does not make those tasks pleasant or efficient. It's already been done a thousand times.

    If every Windows tablet user replaced their old tab for this new one, the product would still be a failure. Someone has to answer the question, what makes this tablet different enough so that the market takes to it this time. You don't even have to consider the iPad. The Slate was a failure without it. When you add the iPad into the mix...

    Is that to say that no one will buy and like this thing? No! The same people will buy and enjoy this as did the previous incarnations. That is just an insignificant number.... and shrinking.
  13. #53  
    UMPC, I know. MBA = Mac Book Air?

    It is difficult to defend the failed TabletPCs. The iPad provides a much more elegant and intuitive user interface (watching a two year old interact with it is ample proof of this. I should also mention that the same is true with webOS).

    However, the reason why iPad is successful, where tabletPCs failed can equally be attributed to the Apple corporate strategy and branding (e.g. leveraging the success of the iPhone, releasing the iPhone before the iPad and the power of a singular model).

    Interestingly, the success of the iPad has also created an opportunity. For instance, I would only buy the HP Slate, not because it competes against what might be its direct predecessors, the tabletPC or netbooks; but, because it aspires to compete against the iPad. Therefore, the iPad has potentially given companies like HP the opportunity to rewrite win-tablet history.

    HP Slate has a "capacitive" touchscreen, in a slate/pad/tablet-only form-factor unlike tablets that historically morphed to reveal hard-keyboards and had resistive touch-screens. So, the HP Slate is mostly going to be viewed against the more immediate memory of the successful iPad, for which I would choose the HP Slate because it offers multitasking capabilities and all the other items I listed in my earlier post.

    It is difficult to view the Mac Book Air or netbooks as alternatives to consider since they do not offer the capacitive touch interface with the portablilty of flipping and twisting it arround, handling it one-handed to read a book e.t.c. The HP Slate is also lighter than some of the lightest netbooks.

    One other thing that I truly surprises me is that no one seems to have ported something that is potentially touch friendly like the open-source Meego (Atom-friendly) onto a capacitive touch screen device.

    Interestingly, this is something I can experiment with on a touch interface when I get the HP Slate, via a Live USB.
  14.    #54  
    DPC, I have heard that theory before, but categorically reject it for the following reasons:

    1. For the business that does not care about hype, aesthetics, or being cool, the tablet is just a toy regardless of the OS. All they want is the most efficient way to run Windows and get things done. They already have it. Removing the keyboard and raising the price is a no go for these businesses.

    2. For the business that is interested in thinking differently, and retooling to get things done in a whole new and exciting way, the iPad is the answer. The Slate, for them, just represents yesterday's failed attempt to solve yesterday's problems. The iPad is the new hotness, they already know it and like it because they already own one for personal use. It is already being deployed in most of the Fortune 100 companies, so it already works for the most successful businesses in the world. And, it's more affordable.

    One final thought. All of this speculation in the tablet arena is based on the FALSE assumption that there is renewed interest in the tablet market. There is NO mass-market interest in tablets; THERE IS INTEREST IN iPads! The iPad is not a rising tide that raises all ships; it is an iceberg that crushes all ships.

    I have not read a single report suggest that non-iPad tablets are selling any better today than they were before the iPad. Newer models of the same thing will only give owners of older models something to which they can upgrade. Even then, a strong percentage of that market has already shifted to the iPad. Refreshing the Slate will do HP about the same amount of good as releasing the Pre 2. Good luck with that.
  15. #55  
    There hasn't been any iPad-competitive device on the market.

    And by iPad-competitive, I mean:
    * has a "capacitive" touch screen
    * has processor and RAM specifications to match or exceed the iPad's
    * runs a full fledged touch optimized operating system
    * has TV commercial
    * is competitively priced

    and available for sale.

    Consequently, anything that you, I or other reports say is purely speculative, based on varying levels of information.

    Unfortunately, HP chosen not to compete with the HP Slate running Windows 7 from their lack of large-scale promotional media coverage or .

    While this is likely because of their bigger plans with webOS later next year, they might be jeopardizing a large window of opportunity here to differentiate and get in early.
  16.    #56  
    Here is an interesting article that suggests that the "business" focus of the Slate is just a smokescreen to avoid direct comparisons to the iPad.I happen to agree, and believe that marketing the Slate as "business only" is a bad idea for a number of reasons:

    1. By implication, the Slate is not for consumers. If you buy this thing for your business, you will have to buy something else for your personal tablet needs.

    2. Windows is not for consumers. The only differentiator is that it runs Windows. Windows is for business and not for consumers. MS may not agree.

    3. The iPad (the only competition) is not for business. This notion is demonstrably absurd, as many of the most successful businesses in the world are already deploying iPads.

    4. "Business" is code for boring. The iPad is geared for the fun loving consumer, not for the serious worker. The Slate is for the person who does not want to enjoy the experience of using a tablet.

    5. If you are a business person, pay no attention to our other products. That tablet that we glommed onto that printer you just bought shouldn't be taken seriously. And, the upcoming wOS pad is nothing you need to look at either.

    These are the messages that HP is sending to business with this kind of bifurcated marketing. The cameras also send a mixed message, as many businesses have been traditionally leery about welcoming devices with cameras. That is definitely not a business friendly feature.
  17. #57  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    DPC, I have heard that theory before, but categorically reject it for the following reasons:

    1. For the business that does not care about hype, aesthetics, or being cool, the tablet is just a toy regardless of the OS. All they want is the most efficient way to run Windows and get things done. They already have it. Removing the keyboard and raising the price is a no go for these businesses.

    2. For the business that is interested in thinking differently, and retooling to get things done in a whole new and exciting way, the iPad is the answer. The Slate, for them, just represents yesterday's failed attempt to solve yesterday's problems. The iPad is the new hotness, they already know it and like it because they already own one for personal use. It is already being deployed in most of the Fortune 100 companies, so it already works for the most successful businesses in the world. And, it's more affordable.

    One final thought. All of this speculation in the tablet arena is based on the FALSE assumption that there is renewed interest in the tablet market. There is NO mass-market interest in tablets; THERE IS INTEREST IN iPads! The iPad is not a rising tide that raises all ships; it is an iceberg that crushes all ships.

    I have not read a single report suggest that non-iPad tablets are selling any better today than they were before the iPad. Newer models of the same thing will only give owners of older models something to which they can upgrade. Even then, a strong percentage of that market has already shifted to the iPad. Refreshing the Slate will do HP about the same amount of good as releasing the Pre 2. Good luck with that.
    You are pretty clueless about companies/departments that actually use Windows tablets for business use. The iPad isn't going to work. They need to use Windows applications, sometimes custom made for the company, to work with the tablet.

    The biggest thing the Slate 500 brings to the table is a great price. Most of the current Windows tablets cost anywhere from 1500-2000 bucks. The Slate 500 undercuts these other models by a lot, which is going to make a lot of IT finance people happy.

    Just because you don't see the market for this tablet doesn't mean it doesn't exist.
    Palm Vx -> Treo 600 -> Treo 700p -> Centro -> Pre (Launch Phone 06/06/09) -> AT&T Pre Plus with Sprint EVDO swap -> Samsung Epic 4G w/ Froyo
  18.    #58  
    Quote Originally Posted by NickDG View Post
    You are pretty clueless about companies/departments that actually use Windows tablets for business use.
    First, I didn't write the article, I just happen to agree with it. Second, calling me clueless because you disagree with me is beneath you, and third, the iPad is already being used in many businesses. That number is set to increase as more execs bring their personal iPad to work.

    Just because it is not good for SOME companies, does not make the iPad BAD for business, nor does it automatically make the Slate good. It depends on the business, and their particular needs. The equation cannot be reduced to business or consumer. That is an outdated mindset.
  19. #59  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    First, I didn't write the article, I just happen to agree with it. Second, calling me clueless because you disagree with me is beneath you, and third, the iPad is already being used in many businesses. That number is set to increase as more execs bring their personal iPad to work.

    Just because it is not good for SOME companies, does not make the iPad BAD for business, nor does it automatically make the Slate good. It depends on the business, and their particular needs. The equation cannot be reduced to business or consumer. That is an outdated mindset.
    I was referring to post #57.

    iPads are being used in businesses just like smartphones. For e-mail, calendar, contacts and web browsing. This is not a bad thing but it's the truth. Outside these tasks the iPad doesn't do much.

    The Windows tablets have a different role. They are used in creative departments running custom software for product life cycle management, collaboration and actual design. This is something the iPad can't currently do at the moment.

    I have an iPad and love it. Don't get me wrong. But it is really just a giant smartphone for me and all the other people who use one at my Fortune 500 company. Talking with my friends who work at other Fortune 500 companies tell me the same.

    The iPad can't compete with the tasks needed by businesses that rely on Windows tablets. They shouldn't even be compared.
    Palm Vx -> Treo 600 -> Treo 700p -> Centro -> Pre (Launch Phone 06/06/09) -> AT&T Pre Plus with Sprint EVDO swap -> Samsung Epic 4G w/ Froyo
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    #60  
    I think HP would have scrapped this instead of just making it "corporate focused" if they didn't have corporate customers asking for it. (i.e. companies that want tablets that can run software they're already using). Then again, HP isn't shy about just putting out whatever they've built whether there's a real market at that price point or not (hello $400 PhotoSmart eStation C510).

    I can certainly think of numerous applications where a tablet is a superior solution to a netbook/laptop and windows is superior to iOS. Anywhere you have to walk around while using the thing makes a netbook unweidly, and anyone that needs software that's not web-based or in the App Store can't go with an iPad. Medical is the big obvious one, and that is a big enough market itself that it is worth targeting.
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