Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 22 of 22
  1. #21  
    Kupe, I just wanted to acknowledge your post, and will reply to it in full later. You make a few good points, and did a good job exploiting some of my less than perfect wording in some cases. But, my overarching points still stand, even if the examples given were not the best.

    I can assure you, I have no chip on my shoulder. I speak only as an end-user. I have a little technical knowledge, but not enough to matter. As a consumer and user of products to get real work done, I have a certain perspective that people who love tech for tech's sake may not have.

    I think we both represent different aspects of the industry. I believe the balance of power is starting to shiv to the average end user and away from the geek elite. Having once flirted with the idea of diving into computer science, I certainly understand your side of the argument.
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    Kupe, I just wanted to acknowledge your post, and will reply to it in full later. You make a few good points, and did a good job exploiting some of my less than perfect wording in some cases. But, my overarching points still stand, even if the examples given were not the best.

    I can assure you, I have no chip on my shoulder. I speak only as an end-user. I have a little technical knowledge, but not enough to matter. As a consumer and user of products to get real work done, I have a certain perspective that people who love tech for tech's sake may not have.

    I think we both represent different aspects of the industry. I believe the balance of power is starting to shiv to the average end user and away from the geek elite. Having once flirted with the idea of diving into computer science, I certainly understand your side of the argument.
    I'm not a computer scientist. I'm not an engineer. I'm not an MCSE. Essentially I'm just a user. I use Windows machines and Macs and Linux boxes and Sparc workstations. What I am, mostly, is curious. I like to explore different technologies to see how they work and to decide if they work for me. I'm lucky in that I work in a company that indulges my curiosity by letting me buy stuff on their dime (on my own time) and then it benefits from my curiosity through reports from a typical user (me) about the appropriateness of a technology for our corporation. My explorations (and reports) focus heavily on impacts to routine productivity because that's how the cost-benefit of the new technology is truly measured.

    That said, I found your open source software comments to be the ill-informed, stereotypical rantings of someone who knows a little bit about a subject, presumes to know a lot about it, and wants to get up on a soapbox to show off this (noticeably limited) knowledge. This is often described as The Dunning-Kruger Effect and is a common phenomenon in our information-rich existence. I recommend you immerse yourself a bit more in the open source world before you make other similarly inane posts. A good place for you to start would be with "The Cathedral and the Bazaar" (wikipedia link), a treatise on the differences technically and philosophically between open and closed source software development (you can buy the book here). It will open your eyes up to a new world.

    Remember, you were a Mac novice or a Windows novice or a whatever (MSDOS?) novice once upon a time. Now, you have "a little technical knowledge," but apparently not in the OSS world. Trust me, it takes no more knowledge to understand the Linux environment and its software, for example, than it does to run a Mac - but first you have to gain that knowledge.
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions