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  1.    #1  
    Right now it's my #2 OS (after webOS). I think it looks great. The aesthetics put it way above Android, and having Zune on there is a perk.

    If webOS falters, I'm eyeing the HD7 or Dell Venue Pro/Lightning.
  2. #2  
    I absolutely agree with the OS ranking. All my past palm phones were windows-based. Since I started using smart phones, I have used nothing but palm. I pondered many a night before hanging up my Palm Pro running windows on the Pre Launch day and I have loved webOS ever since. Does any Sprint user know which phone is coming out for Sprint?


    "How art thou, thou globby bottle of cheap, stinking chip oil? Come and get one in the yarbles, if ya have any yarbles, you eunuch jelly thou!"
  3.    #3  
    I wouldn't conflate WM6 with WP7 at all...

    Anyway, Sprint is getting the HTC 7 Pro in early 2011--no specific date yet.
  4. #4  
    I don't think the OS is good, but it definitely has enough resources and momentum to get somewhere. They already have a bunch of phones and big name apps comming out.
  5. #5  
    WebOs has nothing to worry about.

    (As long as they don't follow in MS foot steps with their launch)

    MS should have picked one vendor, probably HTC, pick two devices, one with keyboard, one without.

    The problem with this strategy is all phones are not created equal. Let's take ATT. They are getting 3 phones. How much do you wanna bet that one of the phones will have a bug unique to that model. Where will the user go to get this addressed? At least with Palm and Apple, you had one source to go to. Will MS step in at this point and force the manufacturer to address the bug? There are 12 different phones on Engadget going to various vendors in various countries. What happens if 3 phones have unusual bugs? The hardware is just being put out there with no consideration for support. If a WP7 phone does have a bug swapping phones wont fix that.

    MS should have taken a page out their Xbox experience and built their own phone. (But have it designed in Japan). Too bad they feel they must always make multiples of everything. It's like they are not sure.

    What about updates? Will all phones get the same updates? This looks like Android all over again, fractured. I really wanted to get my hands on this but I have grown accustomed to getting meaningful updates and until I see the whole MS game plan I will keep my distance.
    Last edited by sinsin07; 10/12/2010 at 06:52 PM.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by slowpoke View Post
    I wouldn't conflate WM6 with WP7 at all...

    Anyway, Sprint is getting the HTC 7 Pro in early 2011--no specific date yet.
    Thanks a bunch. No confusion with the two versions what so ever. I think what I miss the most isn't so much the OS, but the office suite, my financial apps, and some other productivity applications that I used religiously. I hope the super device is release by Palm soon.


    "How art thou, thou globby bottle of cheap, stinking chip oil? Come and get one in the yarbles, if ya have any yarbles, you eunuch jelly thou!"
  7. jwinn35's Avatar
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    #7  
    no cut and paste and very very limited multi task is a definite turn off. We will see when they implement some things through updates. Other than that the gui is kind of growing on me.
  8. bdog421's Avatar
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    #8  
    We'll see if a ton of hardware can carry a feature-less new OS, I really rank it from the software side as the #5 O.S. From the harware side it looks as it may just lose out to android, so all in all as long as it's on the same page with HTC,samsung,LG,ect,ect it could do ok, but it's not really looking all that compelling(my opinion). It will do better then the one handset palm launched with in mid'09, but won't take the place of android or iOS. How fast can they mature the OS, is the question? They have good hardware.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by sinsin07 View Post
    WebOs has nothing to worry about.

    (As long as they don't follow in MS foot steps with their launch)

    MS should have picked one vendor, probably HTC, pick two devices, one with keyboard, one without.

    The problem with this strategy is all phones are not created equal. Let's take ATT. They are getting 3 phones. How much do you wanna bet that one of the phones will have a bug unique to that model. Where will the user go to get this addressed? At least with Palm and Apple, you had one source to go to. Will MS step in at this point and force the manufacturer to address the bug? There are 12 different phones on Engadget going to various vendors in various countries. What happens if 3 phones have unusual bugs? The hardware is just being put out there with no consideration for support. If a WP7 phone does have a bug swapping phones wont fix that.

    MS should have taken a page out their Xbox experience and built their own phone. (But have it designed in Japan). Too bad they feel they must always make multiples of everything. It's like they are not sure.

    What about updates? Will all phones get the same updates? This looks like Android all over again, fractured. I really wanted to get my hands on this but I have grown accustomed to getting meaningful updates and until I see the whole MS game plan I will keep my distance.
    No offense, but it sounds like you don't know much about Windows Phone 7.

    Microsoft has STRICT criteria on what windows 7 is allowed on:
    Minimum requirements
    Microsoft has said that it is issuing "tough, but fair" hardware requirements to manufacturers.[79] All Windows Phone 7 devices, at minimum, must include the following:[4][80]
    Minimum Windows Phone 7 device requirements
    Capacitive, 4-point multitouch screen with WVGA (800x480) resolution
    1 GHz ARM v7 "Cortex/Scorpion" or better processor
    DirectX9 rendering-capable GPU
    256MB of RAM with at least 8GB of Flash memory
    Accelerometer with compass, ambient light sensor, proximity sensor and Assisted GPS
    5-megapixel camera with flash
    FM radio tuner
    6 dedicated hardware buttons - back, Start, search, camera, power/sleep and Volume Up and Down.[81]
    Additionally, Microsoft updates do not go through the carriers:
    According to Microsoft documentation, software updates will be delivered to Windows Phone users via Microsoft Update, as is the case with other Windows operating systems.[43] Microsoft has the intention to directly update any phone running Windows Phone 7 instead of relying on OEMs or wireless carriers.[44] The software component, called Windows Phone Update, exists both on the phone (for smaller updates, over-the-air) and in the Zune PC software (for larger updates, via USB connection). Users will be notified to attach their phones to a PC if such an update is required.[45] Charlie Kindel, Program Manager for the developer experience of Windows Phone, confirmed that the update infrastructure system for Windows Phone 7 was available and that Microsoft is "in a position where we have the systems in place to effectively and reliably deliver updates to (Windows Phone 7) users".[46]
    Microsoft plans to regularly ship minor updates that add missing features, such as copy and paste, through out a year, and major updates once a year.[47]
    All third-party applications can be updated automatically from the Windows Phone Marketplace.[48]

    The reason Microsoft doesn't make their own phone (oh wait they did, the Kin) is because their development strategy is not like that. THey are a software company first and foremost. They have only recently started dabbling in their own hardware. Even then, its developed with the help of design companies and not through Microsoft itself. They know what they are good at, and its software. They also have many partners who would not be happy with them going at it alone when they have previously been blessed to make money using Microsoft's software.

    On the flip side, with you comparison to apple. Apple has been a hardware and software company That has always been in their DNA. While that strategy almost led them to bankruptcy.... Microsoft's strategy has done the opposite.

    Yes Apple is booming NOW but that is almost entirely because of the iPod....it was alll a snowball effect from there. Microsoft doesn't have a snowball effect, they don't have the same mindshare when it comes to portable equipment that Apple does.

    Hell, Palm doesn't either...look how well it worked for them so far.
  10. #10  
    [quote=Brain Mantis;2707480]No offense, but it sounds like you don't know much about Windows Phone 7.

    I highly doubt most of these people have been reading up on WP7. But I agree with you, it could be a real contender if MS doesn't lose focus of the road-map they have now.
    I am, therefore I think
  11. delta7's Avatar
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    #11  
    I'm torn on this....

    Positives
    1. Updates from the home screen, facebook updates on the main screen if someone on your friends list uploaded a picture or posted something new.
    2. Hardware specs seem impressive for the minimum.
    3. HTC Sense... which will follow soon
    4. Improved hardware with a choice of different form factors.
    5. Outlook intergreation, MS Office intergration
    6. Xbox live and what seems to be great games

    Negatives
    1. Pretty clunky homescreen that doesn't look visually appealing such as IOS or WEBOS
    2. Microsoft virtual keyboards are usually not great on 6.5, don't know how 7 looks but from the previews it seems pretty bad and kinda small.
    3. Too much Zune based and Zune hasn't really made a dent in Ipod's armor.
    4. OS seems like too much swiping and button pushing which might turn people off from the ease of use, some people don't like to swipe, rather touch and hit back like the Ipod.
    5. Different makers who might be unproven such as LG and kinda Samsung who seems to beat the Galaxy S model too death.
    6. Seems to be a heavy GUI which will drain Battery life.

    I don't know really what to say, Android blew up from Customization and cool form factors and WP7 seems to be the opposite in a sense, a locked down GUI and waiting for MS to do everything instead of giving a choice.

    I don't think copy and paste matters outside of the tech nerds and multitasking on a phone is a serious nerd like issue, most people really don't care about that at all, remember it's a phone, not a PC.

    I think MS needs to find a niche and as of right now they really haven't given a reason why WP7 is better than anything else.
  12. #12  
    Positives
    1. Updates from the home screen, facebook updates on the main screen if
    someone on your friends list uploaded a picture or posted something new.
    I agree with this one! MS did an excellent job of integrating their own type of widget.
    2. Hardware specs seem impressive for the minimum.
    This is to reduce chances of fragmentation, unlike Android.
    3. HTC Sense... which will follow soon
    A preference I guess, I'm not that fond of the HTC Hub personally. The MS UI is simplistic and crisp as is.
    4. Improved hardware with a choice of different form factors.
    Always good to have options.
    5. Outlook intergreation, MS Office intergration
    Yeah these features I guess make WP7 a serious business OS lol.
    6. Xbox live and what seems to be great games
    Also, relatively easy ways for developers to port or code games from what I've read. The addition of XBL will only help though I don't think most people realize you don't need an XBox or XBL account to enjoy XBL for WP7.

    Negatives
    1. Pretty clunky homescreen that doesn't look visually appealing such as IOS or WEBOS
    I guess this is a matter of preference. I don't see how it is clunky. You add everything you need to the home screen, you can select the colors of the hubs and change the background.
    2. Microsoft virtual keyboards are usually not great on 6.5, don't know how 7 looks but from the previews it seems pretty bad and kinda small.
    Based off reviews from tech sites, the virtual keyboards on WP7 devices have gotten great reviews, some like Engagdet saying it almost compares with that of the iPhone so you'll have to play around with a phone to see for yourself. Don't base it off experiences with a older, irrelevant OS.
    3. Too much Zune based and Zune hasn't really made a dent in Ipod's armor.
    Why does Zune need to make a dent in iTunes/iPod to be successful? Zune is very successful around the world and lots of Zune users praise the UI and love that MS is integrating the same in WP7.
    4. OS seems like too much swiping and button pushing which might turn people off from the ease of use, some people don't like to swipe, rather touch and hit back like the Ipod.
    I'm not sure I understand this point, most OSes involve swiping to get where you have to go...
    5. Different makers who might be unproven such as LG and kinda Samsung who seems to beat the Galaxy S model too death.
    This will only show in time but again, from reviews over months now, tech sites are saying all these devices are of solid build quality.
    6. Seems to be a heavy GUI which will drain Battery life.
    Once the phones get into the hands of consumers than questions of battery life can be made.
    I am, therefore I think
  13. #13  
    well all prior versions of windows mobile also had a "windows update" icon...did nothing. Carriers still have a ton of control, and we will have to wait and see if microsoft will indeed control their updates, or if it wil have to play the same game with carrier approval processes.
  14. #14  
    Before I got my Pixi, I used a Motorola Q running Windows Mobile 5 for about three years. WM5 was an improvement over WM2003, but it can't compare to WM6.1 or WM6.5. Clunky, slow, needed registry hacks to do what I needed it to do, crashed periodically, and sometimes just needed to be rebooted. A true Windows machine.

    But, even so, there are some things I could do on my old Q that cannot be done in WebOS. I'm committed to my Pixi--I keep stuff until it DIES, not until I get bored with it--but I would not underestimate the appeal of a WM phone, especially to serious business users. Built-in Office support, flawless Exchange support, and (what I absolutely miss the most) automatic profile switching based on Calendar appointment status... These features may not exactly be sexy, but they are core-level capabilities that, once you get used to, are very hard to live without. MS has a bit of an unfair advantage when it comes to business users, for the obvious reason that they make Office and Exchange.

    I'm really, really missing the automatic profile switching. If I accepted a meeting request or created a meeting in Outlook and set the status of that meeting to "busy," my Q would automatically go into meeting mode (silenced ringer/vibrate) at the start of the meeting, and then automatically go back to normal after the meeting was over. This hardware switch stuff... Meh. It's a nice option to have, but it is certainly no substitute for the automatic switching. I don't even see a field to set the status of a meeting in WebOS.
  15. cgk
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    #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by MDsmartphone View Post
    well all prior versions of windows mobile also had a "windows update" icon...did nothing. Carriers still have a ton of control, and we will have to wait and see if microsoft will indeed control their updates, or if it wil have to play the same game with carrier approval processes.
    That is why this time around, Microsoft have insisted on control - to ensure that the experience is consistent for users.



    Despite Windows Phone 7 handsets being offered through a variety of operators and from different handset manufacturers, Microsoft's strict rules on hardware specs means it can manage the updates itself, Ran said.
    That tighter control should let Microsoft manage the user experience better than Android has, said IDC analyst Nick McQuire. “Microsoft has some strategic incentives to really control the user experience,” he said.

    “It has a big challenge ahead to build a relationship directly with consumers. To do that, it needs to make sure that user experience is really tight and clean and very Microsoft in terms of how it wants its user experience to be governed.”

    Read more: Microsoft keeps Windows Phone 7 updates under control | Security | News | PC Pro Microsoft keeps Windows Phone 7 updates under control | Security | News | PC Pro
  16. #16  
    After playing around with a Windows Phone for a few minutes, I can say there is some good and some bad. I actually really disliked the Hub screen. So many things moving around (just to move around, not really showing me any new info) was actually kind of annoying. Plus, the built in hubs are (mostly) plain ugly.

    The application selections screen (the screen to the right of the Hub screen) is embarrassingly bad.

    I really liked the email client and the OS speed. My biggest problem was the system font size (way to small, not sure if it can be changed). Also, after putting it down, I had no sudden desire to go rush out and buy one.
  17. #17  
    I'll admit I haven't had a good look at the OS or hardware yet but I do think that in terms of a launch they've gone with the approach I wish HPalm would take, a range of new devices at the same time as the new OS with a decent media coverage.

    As for hardware and the OS, I'll look at them closer to when my contract runs out and see if they have anything to beat whatever HPalm's lineup is at the time.
  18. #18  
    I didn't even bother to read the thread as it seems a lot of people around here do. So I'm just going to shoot from the hip and hope I hit something. Advertising a whopping 2,000 apps in the catalogue. Should I be excited for that? I'm not. I'm also not bashing it either.
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by sledge007 View Post
    I didn't even bother to read the thread as it seems a lot of people around here do. So I'm just going to shoot from the hip and hope I hit something. Advertising a whopping 2,000 apps in the catalogue. Should I be excited for that? I'm not. I'm also not bashing it either.
    Its more about the hustle they did to launch with 2000 apps.

    And then it turned into impressions from the launch event.
  20. #20  
    Not having handled the actual phone yet, that home page screen is pretty damn ugly. A bunch of big rectangles. Seems too minimalistic to me. I like cool wallpaper or animated wallpaper with nice looking icons.. not big green rectangles.. yuk.
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