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  1.    #1  
    looks as though HTC has gotten into the fray of blocking rooting on Android handset it releases.

    T-Mobile responds to complaints from G2 users seeking root Boy Genius Report

    I was over at XDA a couple of days ago in the thread of over 100 entries trying to break the code and so far most tech mods that have been doing this for years state un rootable. As shown above HTC conferms they added this block, which throws a wrench in the whole OPEN OS for Android owners,Hopefully HP lets the homebrew community stay at home and dosent pull a stunt like this. Anyone up for a boring stock Android handset stay tuned.
  2. #2  
    I rooted my Evo for two reasons...boredom and wireless tether. i happened to also load another ROM (that includes Sense still but a bit prettier version).

    However, the vast vast vast majority of android customers probably don't even know what rooting is nor are they seeking it.

    This is a knock to the XDA forum goers....still though G2 is a solid solid phone.

    If HP ever made routes to block homebrew i'd be done with webos unless they added a **** ton of these patches into it.
  3. #3  
    Its funny though, HTC ussually has the easiest rootable devices...i wonder if this was pressure from T-Mobile.

    I mean honestly, why would Motorola/HTC/Samsung care if you root your device? They still sold a phone.
  4. #4  
    Just read at android central...the hackers are already close to cracking it.
  5. #5  
    "Open" means open to the carriers.

    They don't want customers rooting their phone any more than Apple does. And understandably: people will rooted out phones may very well have more problems with their phones which won't get blamed on the rooting but on the manufacturer or the carrier.
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    #6  
    Man, what a shame. My brother has an Evo and he loves having it rooted. I love how much Palm embraces open development and the Preware community...the other companies could learn from them
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by finngirl View Post
    "Open" means open to the carriers.

    They don't want customers rooting their phone any more than Apple does. And understandably: people will rooted out phones may very well have more problems with their phones which won't get blamed on the rooting but on the manufacturer or the carrier.
    NO MANUFACTURER should have the right to dictate what you do with your phone after you've bought it, plain and simple. All they have is the right to do is refuse to service a rooted or jailbroken phone since that's not how the phone came. I'm getting really sick of the "you rent, not own" philosophy of manufacturers lately.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  8. #8  
    Well, they do have the right to do anything with their phone when they make it.

    If you still crack it, its not like they find you an take it back hha.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    NO MANUFACTURER should have the right to dictate what you do with your phone after you've bought it, plain and simple. All they have is the right to do is refuse to service a rooted or jailbroken phone since that's not how the phone came. I'm getting really sick of the "you rent, not own" philosophy of manufacturers lately.
    Okay I do agree; I don't mean to imply that I don't agree with that.

    But as far as making it EASY, they are under no obligation to make it so, nor service the phone if you've messed it up. After all, plenty of people still jailbreak the iPhone.

    And my point still stands: the open software is not really that open, to consumers.
  10. #10  
    Both Motorola and now HTC on this phone actively block end-user modding. In effect telling you the phone is theirs, not yours. I'm not saying they need to help people mod, but actively blocking owners from using their phones the way they wish seems to be on the rise and it really needs to stop. Your items you thought you purchased should not be held hostage. First it was the carriers, now the manufacturers are getting into the "you rent or license, not own" game.

    It's not only phones, but other hardware too.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  11. #11  
    disagree. Rooting *may* lead to failures/malfunctions of hardware, and the phone owner might load the original ROM again, and then blame the carrier for the fault and ask for a free replacement. It may also lead to software piracy, which is the last thing you want since it will make developers wary of the platform.

    i think everything depends on the intentions. I don't see any negatives in patches/homebrew etc. But the moment it starts getting abused, we may see HP-Palm taking drastic measures.
  12. #12  
    People have bricked phones upgrading to official firmware. Anything *may* happen at any time. And the piracy excuse is overblown. People mainly mod to remove restrictions on their phones or install customer firmware and beta apps.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    People have bricked phones upgrading to official firmware. Anything *may* happen at any time. And the piracy excuse is overblown. People mainly mod to remove restrictions on their phones or install customer firmware and beta apps.
    I strongly disagree on that point, every person I know who has jailroken their iphone has had the sole intentions of getting pirated apps. Whilst my sample size is admittedly small (~20 people) that is still significant. When I have questioned my other friends with iphones about jailbreaking, they all have shared the same view, that they want to so that they can get all apps for free. When I asked about the other mods you can do they were dumbfounded and said they only wanted free apps.
    Whilst I displayed great displeasure at this attitude they had no prblem that they wanted to rip off apps.

    If homebrew was ever to be abused in such a way, with so many users, then I should hope HP / Palm would take active steps to stop piracy.

    Pip
  14.    #14  
    now isnt rooting roms like on android and wm much more dangerious then jailbreaking a iphone, or unlocking a Pre or Pixi?
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by pip smith View Post
    I strongly disagree on that point, every person I know who has jailroken their iphone has had the sole intentions of getting pirated apps. Whilst my sample size is admittedly small (~20 people) that is still significant. When I have questioned my other friends with iphones about jailbreaking, they all have shared the same view, that they want to so that they can get all apps for free. When I asked about the other mods you can do they were dumbfounded and said they only wanted free apps.
    Whilst I displayed great displeasure at this attitude they had no prblem that they wanted to rip off apps.

    If homebrew was ever to be abused in such a way, with so many users, then I should hope HP / Palm would take active steps to stop piracy.

    Pip
    Good point.
    Due to the cancellation of the penny, I no longer give 2 about anything. I may however, give a nickel
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by pip smith View Post
    ...every person I know who has jailroken their iphone has had the sole intentions of getting pirated apps. Whilst my sample size is admittedly small (~20 people) that is still significant.
    Not to cast dispersions on your choice of friends, but none of the 60 or so folks I know with jailbroken iPhones are the least bit interested in pirating apps - they simply want the full control over their phones that jailbreaking provides. Typically there are 1 or 2 Cydia apps they want. I'm siding with the Diva on this point.

    Quote Originally Posted by wellwellwell11
    now isnt rooting roms like on android and wm much more dangerious then jailbreaking a iphone, or unlocking a Pre or Pixi?
    Not in my experience. All three actions can result in a bricked device. All three actions generally have a fall back to factory settings. The HTC trick with the G2 is unique in the Android world (so far) - it will be interesting to see if it affects sales (as if T-Mobile sales even mattered ). Now if you'd said "more complicated" instead of "more dangerous" then you might be on to something. Android and WM, because they exist on a larger number of devices, may require multiple approaches to rooting/re-ROMming that you don't need in the iOS/webOS world as much. So it's more complicated for the initial hackers, but by the time a technique get down to the everybody level, like iOS and webOS, it's a simple menu-driven, push-button activity.
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    Not to cast dispersions on your choice of friends, but none of the 60 or so folks I know with jailbroken iPhones are the least bit interested in pirating apps - they simply want the full control over their phones that jailbreaking provides. Typically there are 1 or 2 Cydia apps they want. I'm siding with the Diva on this point.
    Not to be stereotypical, but are your friends the nerdy/techy type?
    Mine are ordinary girls and boys, like the majority or smartphone users, and the only benefit they have heard of as a result of jailbreaking is free apps. You must understand that the majority of users will not be interested in mods, but free apps will always get people in the mood.
    Whilst agree that users should be free to somewhat mod, I think it more imprortant that manufacturers block against piracy and protect their warranty (ie be able to cancel the warranty if a user mod could bork hardware)

    Pip
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by pip smith View Post
    I strongly disagree on that point, every person I know who has jailroken their iphone has had the sole intentions of getting pirated apps. Whilst my sample size is admittedly small (~20 people) that is still significant. When I have questioned my other friends with iphones about jailbreaking, they all have shared the same view, that they want to so that they can get all apps for free. When I asked about the other mods you can do they were dumbfounded and said they only wanted free apps.
    Whilst I displayed great displeasure at this attitude they had no prblem that they wanted to rip off apps.

    If homebrew was ever to be abused in such a way, with so many users, then I should hope HP / Palm would take active steps to stop piracy.

    Pip
    My iPhone was jailbroken to add themes and apps that are not in the App Store. But they're still legit apps, just on Cydia. I get any Apple approved apps from the App Store, not pirated.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by pip smith View Post
    Not to be stereotypical, but are your friends the nerdy/techy type?
    Mine are ordinary girls and boys, like the majority or smartphone users, and the only benefit they have heard of as a result of jailbreaking is free apps. You must understand that the majority of users will not be interested in mods, but free apps will always get people in the mood
    Whilst agree that users should be free to somewhat mod, I think it more imprortant that manufacturers block against piracy and protect their warranty (ie be able to cancel the warranty if a user mod could bork hardware)
    I'm not sure what you mean by 'ordinary girls and boys,' but the vast majority of iPhone users are aged 25-55 (Link). People in that age bracket generally have enough disposable income to afford the iPhone and any software they choose to use with it (i.e. they don't need to pirate). If your 'boys and girls' are in that small percentage aged 24 and below, there's a good chance their parents purchased the phone for them, but won't support software purchases so they resort to piracy. Bad on them, but they're a small percentage and hardly representative of the larger iPhone population.

    Of course it's different with the iPod Touch. Lots of kiddies' parents bought them those, but most of them have little to no skills for jailbreaking.
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    I'm not sure what you mean by 'ordinary girls and boys,' but the vast majority of iPhone users are aged 25-55 (Link). People in that age bracket generally have enough disposable income to afford the iPhone and any software they choose to use with it (i.e. they don't need to pirate). If your 'boys and girls' are in that small percentage aged 24 and below, there's a good chance their parents purchased the phone for them, but won't support software purchases so they resort to piracy. Bad on them, but they're a small percentage and hardly representative of the larger iPhone population.

    Of course it's different with the iPod Touch. Lots of kiddies' parents bought them those, but most of them have little to no skills for jailbreaking.
    The data in that link has flaws in the context of this argument - the research was done in the US, and so is the scope of your argument (and some posters above), whereas the issue being discussed is global and has a global impact.
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