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  1.    #1  
    First, this thread is not intended to be flame bait, so put those flamethrowers down. This is not about why you hate some other company, unless that is the only reason for your current loyalty.

    Everyone around here knows that I am an Apple supporter, for the most part. What you may not know is that has not always been the case. I bought my first Mac in 2002, and never looked back.

    Before that, I was all Windows, all the time. I settled for most MS solutions. I owned a Creative MP3 player. I even owned Palm-based products. Did I mention HP? In other words, I was an average tech consumer. I used some of everything and cared about spec-sheets and price. I was loyal to nothing.

    That all changed when I bought my first Mac. The hardware and OS were filled with so many little touches of class and usability, the experience was miles ahead of anything I had ever used before. Apple clearly thought about the end user in ways that other companies didn't.

    I didn't jump on the iPod right away. I couldn't understand why I should ditch my Creative player. The Price and spec-sheet didn't add up. I eventually used one. Suddenly, it all made sense in ways that did not show up on a spec-sheet. Bag on iTunes all you like. It revolutionized music management on a computer. Again, Apple's attention to detail won me over.

    When the iPhone was first announced, I had no interest. I was an unhappy Sprint customer, but figured that all phones and all carriers were equally bad. In some ways, I was pushed into the iPhone because Sprint was so bad, I just couldn't stand it. Apple provided an alternative to the way things were done in that industry. Think back on the pre-iPhone days. It was bad. I bought my first iPhone and never looked back.

    Hello, iPad.

    Along the way, Apple introduced a complete screen-reader for the blind into their Mac OS. They, then, did the same thing for all iPhones. They care a great deal about accessibility, much more so than any other company I have ever dealt with. They do not make you pay extra for add-ons, or struggle with third-party solutions. They took responsibility and made sure everything they built was accessible to everyone. Go Apple!

    Finally, there is a reason customer satisfaction numbers for Apple are through the roof in every poll. I will just share my latest experience. Because of something stupid I did, I completely bricked my iPad.

    I called the nearest Apple Store last night and told them I bricked my iPad by doing something stupid. They said to bring it in anyway. They tried to reset it using their tools, but could not. It had to do with the UDID#. After trying for about an hour, they gave up and told me that it could not be repaired. It was well and truly bricked. Yes, that is most definitely possible.

    They knew what I did to it, but did not give me a hard time. They told me they would consider it a hardware issue under warranty, and just gave me a brand new one, no refurb. I was shocked. I reiterated that the damage was my fault and was in no way a warranty issue. They assured me that they knew, but just wanted to make me happy. I was almost brought to tears. My wife was equally shocked and giddy.

    This is the stuff of brand loyalty. Apple gained mine the old fashioned way: they earned it. I get he feeling that a lot of brand loyalty is because that company or product is anti-Apple. That is just sad. I would hope there are better reasons. So, have at it. What makes you so loyal to your company of choice?
  2. #2  
    A lot of people don't care about fancy transitions/animations and want balls to the wall power and their applications to work for a reasonable price.

    Thats why i like windows over OSX. Hell, i used to turn off my animations before windows 7.

    But i don't have any brand loyalty. I buy what i want to use from anyone. I'll have product loyalty, but not brand loyalty.

    And i disagree about smart phones being bad before the iPhone...but thats based on opinions. But as a former Treo user, i was VERY happy with my device. Technology did progress however and that brings us to our current state.
  3. noahisaac's Avatar
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    #3  
    I don't have brand loyalty in the way you do. I go with whatever product will best suit my needs. I do have a certain brand "disloyalty" for companies that like to "bundle" their products or those companies that make sure their products don't play well with others.

    I do share your loyalty for companies that do a particularly good job with customer service. I think this positive attitude comes from the top of an organization, and so can permeate an entire company. I've consistently had positive experiences with Cogent, Cisco (not Linksys), Delta Airlines, DirecTV, US Cellular (when I lived in the Midwest) to name a few. If a company has great customer service but a crappy product, I will abandon them.
  4. #4  
    I buy what works for me. Palm always did PDA stuff like calendar mgmt and contact mgmt better than anyone else. Still do, but not by as wide of a margin.

    Here is an interesting chart showing the opportunity HP has in front of them. At the bottom are charts showing "next phone purchase" by "current phone" where you can see what % of each installed base is at risk... and blackberry is in the most trouble.

    How Popular Is the iPhone, Really? [INFOGRAPHIC]
  5. #5  
    I don't have a brand loyalty, I go by price to value for my wants.
  6. #6  
    You were almost brought to tears, OP? Don't shop at Costco or Home Depot. You may never recover emotionally from their rather lenient return policies.

    In all seriousness, I can understand brand loyalty and people wanting see companies they identify with - for whatever reason - succeed. But it's just a product. If Apple made a product that was for me, I'd support them. If HP made a product that was for me, I'd support them. If Sanyo made a product that was for me, I'd support them too. Why does it matter who makes whatever as long as it meeds your needs?
  7. #7  
    And thats why i don't think i buy many apple i products. I'm not part of the iTunes ecosystem. Its not on my computer and i don't use it. On the other hand, i do use a number of google services so Android is servicing my needs well right now. I also use a number of microsoft services (used to use zune before i lost it, have an xbox360 and windows 7) so Windows phone series 7 looks interesting as well.
  8.    #8  
    I used to feel the same way about brand loyalty as some of you seem to feel. It is not something that happens casually. It happens over time, and for good reasons, usually. When a company repeatedly shows that it cares about its customers, it is easy for the customer to care about the company. You don't just toss a company like that aside for some copy-cat offering a cheaper price.

    To be clear, the iPad was a day-one iPad. It was not under any kind of return policy. It was also dented and scarred from a nasty drop. The drop had no affect on the performance of the iPad. It is built like a tank. But there were all kinds of reasons for them to turn me away, and no good ones to help me.

    I assure you, that kind of service makes it all but impossible for some KIRFed up iPad wannabe to get a second glance from me. We are not just buying products that do things. Everyone makes products that do things. We are buying into relationships with companies for the life of that product that does things. Products are a dime a dozen. Relationships matter a great deal.

    There are so many companies that clearly don't give a rip about the end user, that when you find one that does, it stands out. You don't just toss that aside without good reason.
  9. #9  
    I dunno, Dandbj13. The way that Apple treats its customers is a prime factor as to why I don't really buy their stuff. One man's trash and all of that...
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    Like it or not, Apple does have a reputation for not putting a product out there until it is a fully realized hardware and software concept. For example, the iPad sat around in development for a long time - it was conceived even before the iPhone.

    Just look at the current tablet wars. Companies are putting out tablets just because they feel they have to. Whether they can put out a good one is besides the point. eStation Zeen, anyone? Apparently, HP doesn't feel that its discount warehouse reputation will be marred in any way by a product that shows up, gets mediocre reviews, and fades away. They've got channels into the overstock bins of America.
    I seriously doubt the Zeen or whatever it's called was ever a "response" to the iPad. It's some sort of bizarre hybrid that is really an extension of the TouchSmart technology and apps they were using with printers before the iPad ever made it to market.

    HP Unveils the First Web Connected, TouchSmart Printer for the Digital Home | eHomeUpgrade

    JUNE...2009. The Zeen was driven by this, not the iPad. Critique HP all you want or Palm or RIM's tablets all you want...once one of them actually makes it to the market and we can compare. Until then, there's no comparison.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    I used to feel the same way about brand loyalty as some of you seem to feel. It is not something that happens casually. It happens over time, and for good reasons, usually. When a company repeatedly shows that it cares about its customers, it is easy for the customer to care about the company. You don't just toss a company like that aside for some copy-cat offering a cheaper price.

    To be clear, the iPad was a day-one iPad. It was not under any kind of return policy. It was also dented and scarred from a nasty drop. The drop had no affect on the performance of the iPad. It is built like a tank. But there were all kinds of reasons for them to turn me away, and no good ones to help me.

    I assure you, that kind of service makes it all but impossible for some KIRFed up iPad wannabe to get a second glance from me. We are not just buying products that do things. Everyone makes products that do things. We are buying into relationships with companies for the life of that product that does things. Products are a dime a dozen. Relationships matter a great deal.

    There are so many companies that clearly don't give a rip about the end user, that when you find one that does, it stands out. You don't just toss that aside without good reason.
    I simply don't deal with customer service unless i must need to. In my opinion, no company looking for profits care about their customers...you may have had a good experience, but you're just another number. Be happier the person you talked to was a cool person more so than the company was cool.

    Do i get mad at companies for this? Not at all.
  12. #12  
    dandbj13, I just saw your story on the front page of TiPB! Pretty cool.

    I'm not exactly brand loyal either. I use what works. I have a Palm Pre (Palm) on Sprint, an iPod touch (Apple), iPad (Apple), Xbox 360 (Microsoft), Windows 7 (Microsoft) and an Asus eee 1005HA-B netbook (Asus). So really no brand loyalty at all actually.
  13.    #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by ColbyM View Post
    dandbj13, I just saw your story on the front page of TiPB! Pretty cool.
    Thanks for letting me know. Ironically it took a poster on PreCentral to let me know I made it to the front page of TiPb. I had no idea. Thanks for the mention.
  14. #14  
    One time I went to Best Buy and the lady gave me change for a $20 when I only gave her a $10. I told her that I had only given her a $10, but she let me keep the the extra money anyway. That is why I am a loyal Best Buy customer.

    Same thing, right?
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by big_bopper View Post
    One time I went to Best Buy and the lady gave me change for a $20 when I only gave her a $10. I told her that I had only given her a $10, but she let me keep the the extra money anyway. That is why I am a loyal Best Buy customer.

    Same thing, right?
    Not if you weren't verklempt, sir.
  16. #16  
    on reconsidering the point. Customer service is important to brand loyalty in some things for me, I tend to buy things from stores that have good customer service if possible. The brand of merchandise being less important.
  17. #17  
    I'd agree the only thing that could hold brand loyalty for me would be a local store, not a big corporation. The corporation has at best a small hand in how local stores operate, the rest is up to those managing the stores and they're the ones responsible for a good customer service experience, not the corporation itself.
  18. #18  
    I cannot say I am a loyalist to Apple, though I will say I like their products and I too agree they have done more for the end-user than any other company has dreamed of. I bought my first, and so far only, Mac in 2006, it was the first line of Intel Core Duo Mac Minis to be released, 1.66 CD, 2 GB RAM, 80 GB HDD. I paid a hefty price tag, I admit, but I got more than I paid for. I have since built a custom PC for all my gaming, AMD X4 PII @ 3.6 GHz, 6 GB RAM, 2 TB of storage.

    Today I am running Windows 7 on my PC, and Snow Leopard on my Mac. The only two, count them, two, things my PC is better at than my Mac is; Gaming, duh. And converting video. What do I mean these are the only two things it's better at? I mean thing. My Mac takes 14 seconds to boot, that is from the time I press the power button to when I can launch applications. My PC takes 1 minute and 10 seconds before I can launch an application. Shutdown time for my Mac is 3 seconds, my PC is 45 seconds.

    Why is my four year old Mac aging so well? I believe it is because Mac OS X is developed for only a certain number of hardware combinations. Windows on the other hand is open for any hardware vendor to make drivers for, Microsoft approved or not. My point is, Macinstosh hardware is made to work perfectly together, PC hardware is made to work, but not necessarily together. I know I have purchased RAM that works in my mobo, but turns out my CPU limits it. I've bought a sound card that somehow disabled all my PCI bus' while it was plugged in. A couple of examples of what I mean.

    A lot of what I said above can be applied to the quote below.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brain Mantis View Post
    A lot of people don't care about fancy transitions/animations and want balls to the wall power and their applications to work for a reasonable price.

    Thats why i like windows over OSX. Hell, i used to turn off my animations before windows 7.
    Are fancy transitions and animations all people see when they look at OS X? I can understand the argument that you can upgrade you PC to get my more power, you can upgrade you Mac too, everything except the Logic Board, though.

    The animations in OS X are done by the GPU, so no raw CPU power is taken away by the animations. As I mentioned before, OS X is optimized for the hardware chosen for Macs, and so is the software written for OS X.

    So now we're down to the price, compared spec by spec, meaning you get a PC with as close specs as you can get to a Mac, and you will see how reasonable the price actually is when you consider the $100's of free software they include.

    And the age old myth that you cannot find apps for OS X that you use in Windows, it is a wild myth I must admit. There may only be 30 apps to rid DVDs with, while Windows has 300 apps that can do it, being on a Palm Pre forum I don't think I need to explain why having fewer quality apps is better than having hundreds of crap apps.

    I've typed enough for rolling out of bed Time to get my day started.
  19. #19  
    Brand loyalty by a customer should only follow corporate loyalty to that customer. Only after a company proves it's worthy of a customer's loyalty should they receive the benefits of brand loyalty. Too often consumers are willing to offer up their brand loyalty on a trend/meme. With me, companies have to earn the loyalty ... over and over.
  20. #20  
    Well no, thats not all i think there is to OSX. But i've been building my own PCs for the last 10 years. Yes Apple has the benefit of hardware and software union which is great...for some people. Useless to others.

    About software price, yes Apple includes free software...that no one uses. If you need real work done, honestly, people go and buy Office. The iWork stuff is good for some though...but you know what else is? Word Perfect or Google Docs or Open Office. Or hell: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Office_Web_Apps

    And Microsoft also provide a free virus checker that is pretty bad ***:
    http://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials/

    (on another note, its a shame MS can't just include these on Windows because of lawsuits but they should do a better job educating people of Security Essentials.)

    Also, i'm not saying OSX has no applications...what I'm saying are the things I use are not on OSX. So unless i want to buy new software or give up playing the games I play I'm sticking with Windows.

    Honestly, if a general consumer asked me what laptop to get...and their uses would be music, pictures and browsing the internet....i can't come up with a good reason to recommend them a $1000 laptop unless they just wanted a premium brand. Now if they needed a powerful laptop with great battery and had legit uses for the power they are asking...Macbook Pro all the way. Thats one lovely laptop.
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