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  1. #21  
    I think some of the naysayers in this thread are brand loyal and don't realize it. We all are to an extent and much of the time are not even really aware of it. Though i'd like to think i'm more conscious about it as well.
  2. #22  
    Again, i think you are confusing brand loyalty with product loyalty.

    Much liek a few people in this thread said, if i find a product that i like and enjoy...i'll def. talk about that product with people. Like GMail or Google Calender or hell even Google Groups. Yet, i don't use Google Buzz because its silly.

    Its all about products that work for you.
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    #23  
    I think there is something stronger than brand loyalty: brand hatred.

    I've carried a long grudge against apple. This stems from stuff that happened in the days of the Apple IIe. Honestly its still the reason I look elsewhere first. My resolve has only weakened a few times, but I figure at this point might as well go for the long haul.
  4. #24  
    I have no brand loyalty. I buy products I like.

    I have a Palm Pre Plus
    I have an iPad
    I have a Mac Pro
    I have a MacBook Pro
    I have a Dell E6400
    I have an Xbox 360
    I have a Tivo Premiere

    I bought all these because I like the product not the company. Buying a product because you like the company is stupid. Buy the product because you like the product.
    Palm Vx -> Treo 600 -> Treo 700p -> Centro -> Pre (Launch Phone 06/06/09) -> AT&T Pre Plus with Sprint EVDO swap -> Samsung Epic 4G w/ Froyo
  5. #25  
    I will say that the apple os has user interfaces I like... quite a bit. But... apple gives you no freedom. You are a caged bird when you use most of their products, limited in using them in ways they dictate for you. I like my freedom... I use Windows at work because thats what I am forced to use, but its Linux at home... Same with the Pre, I am free to do what I want. I dont like products that place rules on me, if I am going to purchase your products I want to dictate what I will use it for and how. The great customer service you see, and how well your devices work for you is good for a user of your level, you dont mind having the nanny sit next to you because you dont need or want to do anything beyond what they allow you to do.

    And by the way... windows = balls to wall power? Really!?... your OS shouldnt be sucking up system resources... period. An OS that requires graphics acceleration is just obscene.

    I do own an Ipod touch... but I dont think it is the greatest thing ever... in fact I absolutely hate it. The hardware is nice... but I cannot stand itunes. As a consumer I am all over the spectrum for what I buy... I dont experience brand or product loyalty anywhere but in food. I know certain brand name foods taste better than certain low cost foods, so I buy them because I like my food to taste better. But, if something else came along that I liked more, I would drop my preferences in a heartbeat to re-evaluate my spending habits. The same cannot be said for anything else... when I go shopping for electronics, cars, clothing... just anything... I look at functionality/features first and price second... if those two things jive with me I will take it home.
  6.    #26  
    I think we are working with different definitions of brand loyalty. It is simply a matter of giving a company the benefit of the doubt. Given a choice between two products you haven't owned, you choose the one from the brand you trust. Looking at specs, and playing with them for a few minutes in a store tell you very little. You have to have something else to guide your decision. All else being equal, you go with the company you trust.

    It does not mean that you buy everything a company makes. That would be crazy. I do not own an TV. I think Ping is a joke of a failure. iTunes is bloated beyond belief. I don't use Safari on any of my iDevices. The list goes on.

    However, when it comes to a product or service I am interested in, Apple has earned my first, and closest look. I know what they pour into products. I am familiar with the experience they provide. I know they are likely to make right, anything that I don't like, if possible. I trust the product or service will be as safe as such things can be. And I am certainly not going to buy a copy-cat product from a company that cares nothing about me as a customer, but just wants a piece of Apple pie.

    Brand loyalty is a factor in your choice of car, hardware store, and pizza. Everyone on this board who is waiting and hoping for the next Palm product, sight unseen, is a loyalist. They do not want to "abandon ship". Ruby wants customers to "keep the faith". There is nothing wrong with any of this if you believe in the company.
  7.    #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by bluewanders View Post
    The great customer service you see, and how well your devices work for you is good for a user of your level, you dont mind having the nanny sit next to you because you dont need or want to do anything beyond what they allow you to do.
    For some time, I have held the trophy for the most arrogant and condescending poster in the world. I can no longer keep the trophy in good conscience. You clearly deserve it more than me. Congratulations on your win.
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by NickDG View Post
    I bought all these because I like the product not the company. Buying a product because you like the company is stupid. Buy the product because you like the product.
    Buying a product *because* you like the company maybe stupid - especially if you are not interested in the product.

    But buying a product from a company you trust is simply smart - regardless what it is.

    I have predominantly used Apple products at home, Windows at work, and Palm phones (PDAs before that).

    I used to only buy HP printers because I had such incredible customer service experiences with them, because no matter the cost (and they were always more) i knew they'd take care of me if anything went wrong. that was worth the higher price to me.

    Eventually the quality of the printers became such that I began buying printers specifically because they were not HP.

    Although as a vendor in the business place, with a dedicated salesperson, they still rock.
  9. #29  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    For some time, I have held the trophy for the most arrogant and condescending poster in the world. I can no longer keep the trophy in good conscience. You clearly deserve it more than me. Congratulations on your win.
    That was neither meant to be condescending nor arrogant... perhaps you should trying reading it again, this time with an aim to comprehend my entire post rather than taking offense at something you feel is poorly worded.
  10.    #30  
    I started this thread with the intent of exploring brand loyalty. I want to know what you love about what you love, not about what you hate or don't care anything about. So, please, put down the hateraid. Don't tell me why I should not be loyal. Tell me why you are loyal.

    I'm pretty sure Palm has a few loyal supporters left around here. Sound off, about what you love, not about what you hate... unless that really is all there is to Palm support. Say it aint so.

    I am also a bit surprised by so much sudden HP love. Yes, I know they bought Palm, but that doesn't explain the rabid defense of the company I have seen lately. Would you have defended Apple if they had won the bid? I doubt it.

    I am not trying to challenge anyone's loyalty. I just want to hear it stated in terms of positive affirmation. This should not be that hard. And, It should be kind of fun. It's not very much fun right now.
  11. #31  
    Brain Mantis has a good point discerning the difference between brand loyalty and product loyalty.

    Quote Originally Posted by aapold View Post
    I think there is something stronger than brand loyalty: brand hatred.

    I've carried a long grudge against apple. This stems from stuff that happened in the days of the Apple IIe. Honestly its still the reason I look elsewhere first. My resolve has only weakened a few times, but I figure at this point might as well go for the long haul.
    Sounds like me and HP regarding their poor support execution on the HP95/100/200LX series and their early WM devices ... and the successfully completed class action lawsuits associated with them. And their laptops that were incompatible with their all-in-one printers back in 2004.

    ...but I have gotten over it ... somewhat.
  12. #32  
    Quote Originally Posted by Brain Mantis View Post
    Yes Apple has the benefit of hardware and software union which is great...for some people. Useless to others.
    That hasn't been true for a while. Apple just uses PC hardware now and OSX is based off Linux. It's basically like buying a VAIO, you're just paying extra for the logo.
  13. #33  
    Quote Originally Posted by finngirl View Post
    Buying a product *because* you like the company maybe stupid - especially if you are not interested in the product.

    But buying a product from a company you trust is simply smart - regardless what it is.

    I have predominantly used Apple products at home, Windows at work, and Palm phones (PDAs before that).

    I used to only buy HP printers because I had such incredible customer service experiences with them, because no matter the cost (and they were always more) i knew they'd take care of me if anything went wrong. that was worth the higher price to me.

    Eventually the quality of the printers became such that I began buying printers specifically because they were not HP.

    Although as a vendor in the business place, with a dedicated salesperson, they still rock.
    Understood. A good customer experience is always a good thing.
    Palm Vx -> Treo 600 -> Treo 700p -> Centro -> Pre (Launch Phone 06/06/09) -> AT&T Pre Plus with Sprint EVDO swap -> Samsung Epic 4G w/ Froyo
  14. #34  
    Much of the basis for either brand or product loyalty is based of factors much deeper than an actual product or company. Personality type and "formative experiences" for lack of a better term are much more telling. (i.e., psychology)

    Some people are by nature "make it work" types. If something has worked for them in the past they are slow to change and will to give the benefit of the doubt.

    Good - in developing having lasting personal relationships;
    Bad - if you are hanging on to a dead end job.
    Pretty inconsequential in picking a phone.

    Others are quicker to pull the trigger on changes when they feel dissatisfied. As mentioned above sometimes that is good and sometimes it can be a disadvantage.

    As was well mentioned in previous comments, an good or bad experience (even if it is not typical) also will cement a person estimation of a company or product. Apple, Palm, HP , Google, Cisco, Microsoft - they have all had some great products and moments. They have all had some pretty bad ones too. Depending at the point of the curve where your experiences with them intersected, you either love or hate the company.

    HP for example - loved the Laserjet II, a reliable workhorse of a printer. Make me more trusting of the company. Also have had good experiences with their network switches and servers.

    However, if I had known HP only through their cheap $120 inkjet printer (with the 60$ replacement cartridges ) I would totally hate them.
  15. #35  
    I don't agree with "good customer service" promoting brand loyalty, at least to me. Personally, I think if I need customer service then the product isn't worth "loyalty" in the first place.

    I want to see myself being able to handle problems with a product. That gives me product loyalty. If I am consistently finding successor products significantly better, and as relatively useful as I found the past product, I gain brand loyalty. That's exactly what happened with me and Palm.

    I started using their PDAs, cuz they were clearly top of the line. I eventually ended up with the Tungsten|E. Which, imho, is still truly the best, most integrated/complete PDA ever made (excusing its successor E2). At that point, it was time for me to get a cell phone. Obviously I wanted something that combined my Tungsten with a phone. Hello Treo. I graduated through multiple Treo's realizing them to be the most advanced smartphone available.

    Then the iPhone was introduced. It changed everything. Like, marketing the same exact phone except to general consumers except for people who actually use smartphones for their capabilities. I instantly disliked Apple and their theology. They claimed the phone was a huge ummm "revolutionary" device.

    False advertising causes brand hatred.

    Ignorance causes brand loyalty.

    Just saying.
  16. #36  
    Brand loyalty is a lapse in vigilance. You need to stay on companies to make good products otherwise if they think they have your loyalty they start to push out products geared to milk their loyalists.

    I've seen Apple "revolutionize" one product and that was the original iPod. Everything else Apple has released that was "new" has been an evolutionary product marketed as a revolutionary one simply because they got to market with the next step of the product evaluation first, or in the case of the iPad managed to market it better.
  17. #37  
    Quote Originally Posted by Orion Antares View Post
    I've seen Apple "revolutionize" one product and that was the original iPod. Everything else Apple has released that was "new" has been an evolutionary product marketed as a revolutionary one simply because they got to market with the next step of the product evaluation first, or in the case of the iPad managed to market it better.
    Huh?

    The smartphone before the iPhone:



    The smartphone after the iPhone:



    The notebook before the unibody MacBook:



    The notebook after the unibody MacBook:

  18. #38  
    Quote Originally Posted by nappy View Post
    Huh?

    The smartphone before the iPhone:


    The smartphone after the iPhone:


    The notebook before the unibody MacBook:


    The notebook after the unibody MacBook:
    The phone example is an evolution, there were steps between one such step being the iPaq with cell radio attachment.

    The notebook is just a style difference that actually didn't start with Apple. Unless you consider Apple's FisherPrice phase a "revolution" in style....

  19. #39  
    Quote Originally Posted by nappy View Post
    Huh?

    The smartphone before the iPhone:



    The smartphone after the iPhone:

    The smartphone before the iPhone:



    The smartphone after the iPhone:

  20. #40  
    Quote Originally Posted by Orion Antares View Post
    The phone example is an evolution, there were steps between one such step being the iPaq with cell radio attachment.

    The notebook is just a style difference that actually didn't start with Apple. Unless you consider Apple's FisherPrice phase a "revolution" in style....

    The original iMac and iBook DID start a revolution in style. Until that point, PCs were incredibly sterile in design because that was the way computers had always been designed. They may look ridiculous in 2010 but Apple's existence today can be traced directly back to the introduction of the iMac.

    If you look at every leading smartphone on the market today, every single one of them has more in common with the original iPhone than the iPaq. And when you compare the original iPhone to the iPaq, the only thing they have in common is the form factor. Even the touch technology is dramatically different.

    Who made notebooks with aluminum and glass enclosures with this level of polish before Apple introduced the unibody machines? Why did HP switch to such a dramatically different chassis for their Envy line of notebooks?

    I can understand not being a fan of Apple's products but to say that the products their competitors are making aren't influenced by Apple's design process is a difficult point to argue.
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