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  1. #2  
    but it's running windows?

    first reason not to do a windows slate: it needs a hardware button to simulate ctrl+alt+del

    that's so 1980's. Can you imagine the commercial apple would make out of that? Microsoft has lost their minds...
  2. #3  
    Yep...just like HP said...Windaz first....then webOS.
    Sprint|Samsung Epic
  3. #4  
    unless it's a printer, then it's android...?

    besides, THIS is the slate/phone I want:

    http://www.youtube.com/v/udlxr8t1nZM...dded&version=3

    it's in german, but you will get the meaning if you watch it all.
  4. #5  
    Windows might not be the most natural slate OS but for business folks and many home users it may be the most useful.

    It will run my office VPN software
    It will run MS Office
    It will run Firefox/IE/Chrome/Opera
    It will run anything that runs on windows....that's a huge draw and makes it extremely useful.

    Additionally it will run thousands and thousands of windows compatible USB devices.

    c+a+d button or not it will be the most versatile slate available when it launches.
    Sprint|Samsung Epic
  5. #6  
    This can get leaked but not a webOS phone. *sigh*.

    All things considered, just reminds me of a archos nine. Im not sure why your complaining about a hardware ctrl-alt-del key. Its windows.. Its kinda required; I suppose you could be more fancy and open up the virtual keyboard and use ctrl alt del. Oh wait what if it fails? I suppose the virtual keyboard hardware button is useless to according to your standards. You could just use the icon on the desktop.

    But wait! You need to hit ctrl+alt+del when your not in windows, I guess your screwed since you don't want a hardware button.

    Honestly, all things considerd, as cool as a webOS will definatly be; i'd be more interested in the HP Slate since its actually a PC.

    I can say one thing negative, these tablet type devices, MUST have more then 1 USB port. External Devices are a must, Hard Drives, Disc Drives, and Keyboard's and Mouse's for quick technical support.

    So if anyone wants one of these, you need a Powered USB Hub.
  6.    #7  
    This strikes me as being kind of sluggish. The UI doesn't seem finger-friendly at all other than it flashes your touch location on the screen. There's not much changed about Windows 7 to accommodate a touch interface. Hardware button to toggle the virtual keyboard? That's terrible.
  7. #8  
    my thinking is that ctrl+alt+del was a silly method 20 years ago, and even sillier in the age of virtual keyboards and fewer moving parts.

    no reason in the world why that couldn't be done with a single key on any pc or windows device.

    it's just funny that you use the same key combination to log in as you do to reboot. Keep in mind that was the re-boot sequence for DOS. Intentionally complicated to make it hard to accidentally reboot. Kinda silly now.

    and it's sort of like on a mac when you used to drop a disk in the trash can to eject, and a file in the trash to delete. People thoght the trash can would erase the disk.

    paradigms that aren't internally consistent make for a poor UI.

    microsoft has yet to figure that out in most of their stuff. That's all I'm trying to say.
    Last edited by Cantaffordit; 09/23/2010 at 08:48 AM.
  8. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    This strikes me as being kind of sluggish. The UI doesn't seem finger-friendly at all other than it flashes your touch location on the screen. Hardware button to toggle the virtual keyboard? That's terrible.
    All the Windows 7 tablets out there have a hardware virtual keyboard toggle. Before I make a decision on the sluggish touch input, id want to use it without the screen protector thats still on it from the factory.

    Talking about all these hardware buttons, your all too keen to webos and its gestures :-p. You have to remember these are touchscreen computers.

    I suppose the keyboard input could popup when you hit a text input. But Im more then content with a hardware button.
  9. #10  
    very nice
  10. #11  
    Did anyone notice when he touched the screen what the splash looked like? It looks exactly like the WebOS touch splash.
    Sprint Love
  11. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    This strikes me as being kind of sluggish. The UI doesn't seem finger-friendly at all other than it flashes your touch location on the screen. There's not much changed about Windows 7 to accommodate a touch interface. Hardware button to toggle the virtual keyboard? That's terrible.
    yeah...in the video he talks about it being quick...but compared to iPad, this thing runs like a 486.
  12. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by ryleyinstl View Post
    Windows might not be the most natural slate OS but for business folks and many home users it may be the most useful.

    It will run my office VPN software
    It will run MS Office
    It will run Firefox/IE/Chrome/Opera
    It will run anything that runs on windows....that's a huge draw and makes it extremely useful.

    Additionally it will run thousands and thousands of windows compatible USB devices.

    c+a+d button or not it will be the most versatile slate available when it launches.
    Quote Originally Posted by Klownicle View Post
    I can say one thing negative, these tablet type devices, MUST have more then 1 USB port. External Devices are a must, Hard Drives, Disc Drives, and Keyboard's and Mouse's for quick technical support.

    So if anyone wants one of these, you need a Powered USB Hub.
    This seems like it is trying to be too much. There are two major problems with this device. First, it is trying to be a traditional computer in a non-traditional form factor. When you need hardware keyboard buttons, alt keys, and the like, you have missed the point of a touchscreen tablet. The same is true for USB ports and other physical connectivity. Either make a notebook, or make a tablet. Decide.

    Second, MS has only one tool in it's box: a hammer, er, Windows. To them, everything looks like a nail, er, full desktop PC. It is classic Balmer. Everything is a PC. Take Windows and shove it into a phone. Take Windows and shove it into a tablet. There is nothing of this tablet that suggests it will fair any different from its decade of predecessors. There is a steaming pile of fail in them there hills.
  13.    #14  
    Even though the screen is smaller than the iPad, this device does not look any more portable than an iPad. Does this look like something you can carry around with you while having lunch?
  14. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    This seems like it is trying to be too much. There are two major problems with this device. First, it is trying to be a traditional computer in a non-traditional form factor. When you need hardware keyboard buttons, alt keys, and the like, you have missed the point of a touchscreen tablet. The same is true for USB ports and other physical connectivity. Either make a notebook, or make a tablet. Decide.
    I agree. This is cobbled-together nonsense.

    Second, MS has only one tool in it's box: a hammer, er, Windows. To them, everything looks like a nail, er, full desktop PC. It is classic Balmer. Everything is a PC. Take Windows and shove it into a phone. Take Windows and shove it into a tablet. There is nothing of this tablet that suggests it will fair any different from its decade of predecessors. There is a steaming pile of fail in them there hills.
    True on the tablet. Not so true on Microsoft. Windows Phone 7 is proof positive that isn't the case.
  15. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikah912 View Post
    I True on the tablet. Not so true on Microsoft. Windows Phone 7 is proof positive that isn't the case.
    Completely agree. I should have been more clear. WP7 indicates that they were finally forced to try something else for that form factor. The problem is, they didn't learn any lesson that carries over into anything else. WP7 is a grudging admission of the obvious. You can't shove Windows into a phone. Though their naming scheme denies that. They are still trying to shove it into a touchscreen tablet. They are what I call slow learners.
  16. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikah912 View Post
    I agree. This is cobbled-together nonsense.



    True on the tablet. Not so true on Microsoft. Windows Phone 7 is proof positive that isn't the case.
    Phone7 isn't based on Windows, even though the name implies it is. That's the first time MS has tried to start with something other than a full-on PC experience. Probably a lesson learned from acquiring the sidekick guys.

    But, MS products are usually crappy until about version 5 or 10 (phone7 is really Phone1) so it will be awhile before they can really hurt Apple/Google, IMHO.
  17. #18  
    Microsoft isn't trying to do anything. They just ship a product....manufactures roll with it.


    Now Windows embedded compact edition or whatever it calls, does have potential for running on a tablet.



    Note that is an early demo of it and that the UI isn't stnadardized. They stressed OEMs can create whatever UI they want, they just created this basic one to show off the potential. It runs on silverlight.

    I still think a windows phone series 7 tablet would hold strong potential....but MS said they have no plans for that.
  18. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    Phone7 isn't based on Windows, even though the name implies it is. That's the first time MS has tried to start with something other than a full-on PC experience. Probably a lesson learned from acquiring the sidekick guys.

    But, MS products are usually crappy until about version 5 or 10 (phone7 is really Phone1) so it will be awhile before they can really hurt Apple/Google, IMHO.
    All early previews of Windows phone series 7 are more impressed than disappointed.

    I don't think it'll be a bad experience at all by the looks of it. But i agree, every version 1 software goes through growing pains.
  19. #20  
    Microsoft built their empire with great demos followed by disappointing products. They will have the same challenge webOS has, which is that they will need a huge third party app catalog and apps that integrate well into the phone7 UI.

    MS is also famous for building apps to compete directly with their ISV partners, and taking good ISV ideas and copying the feature into the core OS for free. Not saying that's bad, it just can limit ISV enthusiasm until they have a really big installed base.

    Also remember that Balmer runs Microsoft, and he is still trying to figure out how the internet works. Releasing the KIN shows just how little he understands about smartphones, social media, universal search, etc.
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