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  1. #41  
    Quote Originally Posted by bdog421 View Post
    If this is really how most devs feel, I don't see a problem here. Reason I say that is, what dev wouldn't want millions more potential customers? They might not be developing for palm, but palm at least has made it fairly easy for devs to port existing apps over. That's good because devs will port more of their quality apps and leave the duds in the iOS and android app stores. It's being proven now as we get more by the day, all though most are games, at least they are some of the better ones.

    Shoot if I were a dev I'd be developing where there's a much larger customer base to, it's all up to hp if they want to change that and you know it's mostly about market share, and general types of users that brings interest from devs.
    I absolutely agree with the underlined part, and believe that is a good thing about webos. As IOS and Android remain the largest they will be the proving grounds for apps; and when an app is very sucessfull they have the ability to port it to webos thanks to . While leaving alot of the garbage behind.
  2. #42  
    Quote Originally Posted by kinster02 View Post
    I found this article from appnation just wanted to share it even if it doesn't effect me.

    AppNation: BlackBerry, webOS and Windows Phone are Dead to Developers*
  3. #43  
    Quote Originally Posted by Maestro1 View Post
    I absolutely agree with the underlined part, and believe that is a good thing about webos. As IOS and Android remain the largest they will be the proving grounds for apps; and when an app is very sucessfull they have the ability to port it to webos thanks to . While leaving alot of the garbage behind.
    There are a few things wrong with this.

    1. It's just an assumption and I'm not sure what it is based on. If there is to be such potential in webOS, why wouldn't devs port ALL of their apps?
    2. Keep in mind that it is only certain games that are easily portable.
    3. If you are right, the combination of your assumption + #2 above will still leave the app catalog very empty. If the numbers are low, it is one more reason for consumers to skip the platform. In the early days of webOS, Palm seemed to think along the same lines of quality over quantity. They went as far as saying they didn't want the app catalog to become a $0.99 wasteland. Then hey realized the number of apps mattered to the end consumer and started letting in anything (brighthouse labs anyone) just to get their numbers up. They gave up on the quality over quantity thing in order to get their numbers up.

    It seems to me that Palm is looking for a shortcut and it hasn't been working out for them. Lets sync with iTunes, that should bring in many consumers. It didn't work because people already have good devices that sync with iTunes. Lets make it simple for devs to port games from iOS, that should bring in many consumers. WebOS users are happy to get some iOS games, but iOS users ALREADY HAVE THOSE GAMES. So they aren't coming to webOS in significant numbers. What's more, new consumers aren't coming in significant numbers either, they'll simply get an iOS device where they can get those games and so much more. People simply don't go to "me too" devices especially when those devices can only do a very small of the things that the original device can do.

    In the end I do think there's some potential for developers on webOS. They can port their apps and charge a little more for them (to compensate for the smaller market). But I don't believe this will grow the webOS user base. New consumers will not buy a webOS device simply because it has Angry Birds when it is available on more robust platforms.
  4. #44  
    I believe it was Mr. RS: the Palm evangelist at HP, who said on the Palmcast a few weeks ago, that he didn't really care for the idea of ports. His background is in gaming, and he understands the necessity of native apps to a platform. If developers are not writing native apps for your platform; they are not writing for your platform at all.

    This has been historically true for Mac gaming. There are very good reasons why gaming has traditionally sucked on the Mac compared to a Windows PC. Most of the popular games for the Mac have just been ports of Windows games. You can't build a platform out of quick and dirty ports.

    By all accounts, iOS is one of the hardest platforms to write for, using the most difficult language. Developers were beating down Apple's door to write for the platform long before it took over the world. There were no shortcuts. Apple didn't pay them. Waves of developers just kept coming, and still do.

    How has Palm responded? They have reached out to iOS developers to tell them that the hardware of the Pre is so similar to the iPhone that their PDK makes it seamless to just port that iOS app over to webOS with almost no effort. In other words, it's easy, and will net you a few extra pennies. That's no way to build a quality platform.

    Why should developers write for a platform? Because the device is great, and customers are excited about it. Anything else is just a cynical play for "me too" status. MS's WP7 is a perfect example. They already know that developers are not interested in the platform, so they flat-out pay iOS developers to write for WP7. Palm runs contests and tries to convince developers that the Pre is practically an iPhone.

    What should HP do? I have said this many times before. You do not need apps to make a platform successful. If your device is successful, developers will beat down your door and jump through any hoops necessary to make apps for it. HP needs to concentrate on making a device that captures the hearts and imaginations of end users. They also need to build something that has not been seen before, that enables ordinary people to do what they have not done before, in a way that is easier and more intuitive than ever before. Do that, and developers will come.
    Last edited by dandbj13; 09/20/2010 at 10:55 AM. Reason: typo
  5. #45  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    How has Palm responded? They have reached out to iOS developers to tell them that the hardware of the Pre is so similar to the iPone that their PDK makes it seamless to just port that iOS app over to webOS with almost no effort. In other words, it's easy, and will net you a few extra pennies. That's no way to build a quality platform.
    Agreed, agreed, agreed. When Rahul Sood's "pitch" to developers is essentially "I implore to give us a try and see what happens. You could make some side money with little to no effort", it just seems like you're essentially branding your platform as an also-ran. If you can't sell people on YOUR development tools and the unique benefits of your OS, as opposed to squeezing some more juice out of the hard work they've done elsewhere....not good.

    What should HP do? I have said this many times before. You do not need apps to make a platform successful. If your device is successful, developers will beat down your door and jump through any hoops necessary to make apps for it. HP needs to concentrate on making a device that captures the hearts and imaginations of end users. They also need to build something that has not been seen before, that enables ordinary people to do what they have not done before, in a way that is easier and more intuitive than ever before. Do that, and developers will come.
    I'm not sure HP is going to have ONE WebOS device that is a runaway success, though. I think WebOS simply needs A) Way more robust development tools and APIs and B) A device with a big screen that isn't cheap and plasticky.
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