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  1.    #1  
    Interesting ZDNet article about a Piper Jaffray report that predicts Android-based phones will comprise 50% of the smartphone market, iOS will account for 20-30%, and the remaining 20% of the smartphone market will be fought-over by RIM and Nokia. This all supposed to happen over the next 5 years. There is a minor mention that Windows Phone 7 may have a small window of opportunity to succeed in this turmoil. Interestingly, no mention of WebOS. ZDNet (and Piper Jaffray) seems to have a short memory.
  2. #2  
    http://www.streetinsider.com/Analyst+Comments/Piper+Jaffray+Raises+Price+Target+on+Palm+%28PALM%29+to+$24,+Maintains+Overweight/5003538.html

    Kinda hard to predict the next 5 years when things can change so fast in one year.
    Last edited by cardfan; 09/07/2010 at 06:39 PM.
  3. #3  
    I hope this doesn't pan out. I like Android but I love competition and choice. Anyone remember how dull the smartphone market was when it was just Palm at the top? I loved my Treo but you've got to admit that things are very exciting now with Android, iOS, webOS, etc all forcing companies to one-up each other.
  4. #4  
    I think analystis are failing to realize how much room will be openned up as the 'dumbphone' market shrinks. It might seem like a tight squeeze now, but as it starts becoming more affordable to get smart-phones, you'll see more opportunity for other companies to get a decent slice. I think it's sensless to disregard MS and HP considering their ability to target multiple products to multiple demographics at once.
  5.    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by cardfan View Post
    http://www.streetinsider.com/Analyst+Comments/Piper+Jaffray+Raises+Price+Target+on+Palm+%28PALM%29+to+$24,+Maintains+Overweight/5003538.html

    Kinda hard to predict the next 5 years when things can change so fast in one year.
    Ha ha! Good to see they can learn from their mistakes!
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    Interesting ZDNet article about a Piper Jaffray report that predicts Android-based phones will comprise 50% of the smartphone market, iOS will account for 20-30%, and the remaining 20% of the smartphone market will be fought-over by RIM and Nokia. This all supposed to happen over the next 5 years. There is a minor mention that Windows Phone 7 may have a small window of opportunity to succeed in this turmoil. Interestingly, no mention of WebOS...
    what significance should I attach to your quoting "experts" whose opinions mirror mine ??

    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  7.    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post
    what significance should I attach to your quoting "experts" whose opinions mirror mine ??

    Hmmm - is your last name Jaffray perhaps?
  8. #8  
    Analysts predict the future based on a current "snapshot in time" - if WebOS had serious/noticiable market share today, it would have been a factor in this analyst's prognostication, but, sadly, it isn't.

    Right now, WebOS is off thier radar, and for good reasons - there has been nothing to talk about with no new devices in a steadily increasing market yeilding a lower market share - to an analyist, those facts spell "death".

    Just like they did with Apple back in the mid 90's.

    Relax, analysts are more wrong than they are right, in the long run (that's key - they are ALWAYs more concerned with the short term, no matter what they say to the contrary).

    HP/Palm knows what they are doing.
    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  9. #9  
    The thing is, though, Apple recovered by making the iMac, a device very unlike anything they or the rest of the market had done to date.

    Palm is, by all indications, following the same roadmap they had before HP acquired them and releasing WebOS 2.0, all of which is remarkably similar to what they did before. Oh, and they're releasing a tablet which will also be very much like what Apple and Samsung (and possibly Motorola) will have sold millions of before them.
  10.    #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikah912 View Post
    The thing is, though, Apple recovered by making the iMac, a device very unlike anything they or the rest of the market had done to date.

    Palm is, by all indications, following the same roadmap they had before HP acquired them and releasing WebOS 2.0, all of which is remarkably similar to what they did before. Oh, and they're releasing a tablet which will also be very much like what Apple and Samsung (and possibly Motorola) will have sold millions of before them.
    I believe you left out the part where the rest of the market gained an additional 18 months lead while HP/Palm dithered away with bad hardware and an unfinished OS. No wonder they're out of the analysts' pictures - I mean have you zeen (sic) the specs on HP's first tablet, the Zeen?
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    No wonder they're out of the analysts' pictures - I mean have you zeen (sic) the specs on HP's first tablet, the Zeen?
    To be fair, it seems the Zeen is now being pushed as simply a "control panel" for the Zues printer rather than a stand alone unit, according to A|C. So its "meh-ness" could be excused...sort of...kinda...a little. :-)

    Not having even a tiny bit of insight into HP, I'd guess this was well on the way so before webOS so rather than scrap it, they're just pushing it as an "also ran" printer with detachable control panel. It will likely be the only one with Android now that they're doubling down on webOS.
  12.    #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by taharka View Post
    To be fair, it seems the Zeen is now being pushed as simply a "control panel" for the Zues printer rather than a stand alone unit, according to A|C. So its "meh-ness" could be excused...sort of...kinda...a little. :-)

    Not having even a tiny bit of insight into HP, I'd guess this was well on the way so before webOS so rather than scrap it, they're just pushing it as an "also ran" printer with detachable control panel. It will likely be the only one with Android now that they're doubling down on webOS.
    Yeah I saw articles on this too. Which brings up another question: Does HP really see a market for dedicated, wireless, printer controllers running Android? In all my years in this industry I've never heard a person say, "I sure wish someone would just give me the means to switch my printer's paper tray from A4 to letter size on a wireless, touch screen device."
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by deihmos View Post
    I don't get the fascination with Android. Maybe it's because there are not too many choices on the market but Android is the worse modern OS on the market. It doesn't even have a modern look to it. WebOS can easily take the second place with the right device and marketing. WebOS has the potential to become the next business phone also.
    Uh, it's going to take more than marketing and a device. Android has entrenched itself to a certain degree that it would take colossal stagnation (Google doesn't really ever do this) to undo. I work in online for one of the biggest retailers around. In last week's all-hands meeting, they discussed the new mobile strategy for this year, which consists of an iPhone app, followed by a new mobile site and an Android app, followed by.....a Windows Phone 7 app.

    Blackberry, WebOS, and Symbian were not part of the discussion (And people around here are mostly required to carry old ATT Blackberries). I can assure you this strategy was only arrived at after studying the plans of their rivals and making sure we were doing what they were doing.

    Not only does Android have momentum and mindshare...it's got an ecosystem. Almost 100K apps, deep Google Integration, Google TV and Google music on the way later this year likely turning your phone into a complete home entertainment system remote....this stuff means something.

    Apple has shown that leveraging different successful assets to create an ecosystem is the way to go. Microsoft is following suit with deep Zune, Office, and Xbox Live integration.

    What is WebOS going to integrate with? TouchSmart printers? Well, the one's without an Android tablet, I guess, but uh...what else?
  14.    #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by deihmos View Post
    I don't get the fascination with Android. Maybe it's because there are not too many choices on the market but Android is the worse modern OS on the market. It doesn't even have a modern look to it. WebOS can easily take the second place with the right device and marketing. WebOS has the potential to become the next business phone also.
    This is just wishful thinking. What you should be asking is: Given Android is not the [best, prettiest, fastest, coolest, 'modernest-looking,' your other favorite adjective] handheld OS, how is it able to dominate the marketplace?

    Clearly the answer to that question has nothing to do with whatever adjective you chose to put in there. It must be something else. Hmmm... maybe it's about ecosystem. When you buy an Android OS phone, you buy a whole bunch of Google integration, some simply outstanding Google-built apps, a bunch of form-factor choice, a whole slew of apps in an online marketplace, and a lot of future promise because it's backed by a big company with a proven track record now.

    When you buy a WebOS phone, you buy a phone that was in final design in 2008, hasn't had a complete hardware version update in over 15 months, has no announced follow-on version, and has already failed once in the marketplace. Oh, and the promises - I almost forgot the promises. WebOS 2.0 promises to be the best OS ever, HP promises to be the best phone company ever, Palm promises to do better this next time. It's the promis of potential that makes WebOS so awesome. I promise.

    Did I get that last part right?
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    Does HP really see a market for dedicated, wireless, printer controllers running Android?
    Yes they do. It's their continued fight against the paperless office.


    Hey look, you can use this "tablet" to read your favorite "zeens" and newspapers. But wait, there's more! You can also print said zeens and newwpapers directly to your printer! No more struggeling with USB cables

    [VideoClip]baffled person struggling to connect their printer to their computer via USB[/VideoClip]

    Just tap, swipe and print! It's THAT easy.

    [VideoClip]I used to spend hours at the magazine stand picking out my magazines. Now, I just tap, swipe and print![/VideoClip]

    So what are you waiting for. Call the number on your screen now.

    [acceleratedVoice]Printer only compatible with HP high-gloss paper and ink cartridges. Paper not included. Printer cartridges not included.[/acceleratedVoice]
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    This is just wishful thinking. What you should be asking is: Given Android is not the [best, prettiest, fastest, coolest, 'modernest-looking,' your other favorite adjective] handheld OS, how is it able to dominate the marketplace?

    Clearly the answer to that question has nothing to do with whatever adjective you chose to put in there. It must be something else. Hmmm... maybe it's about ecosystem. When you buy an Android OS phone, you buy a whole bunch of Google integration, some simply outstanding Google-built apps, a bunch of form-factor choice, a whole slew of apps in an online marketplace, and a lot of future promise because it's backed by a big company with a proven track record now.

    When you buy a WebOS phone, you buy a phone that was in final design in 2008, hasn't had a complete hardware version update in over 15 months, has no announced follow-on version, and has already failed once in the marketplace. Oh, and the promises - I almost forgot the promises. WebOS 2.0 promises to be the best OS ever, HP promises to be the best phone company ever, Palm promises to do better this next time. It's the promis of potential that makes WebOS so awesome. I promise.

    Did I get that last part right?

    you forgot to mention that its free

    remember: "Android is a very good OS and its free"

    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post
    you forgot to mention that its free

    remember: "Android is a very good OS and its free"

    There's a big difference between "free" Android and what we see here in the US.

    If you want to see "free" Android, hit up eBay or Craigslist and grab you a iPad knockoff Android tablet from China. It's running hilariously outdated firmware and almost is guaranteed to have no access to the Market or any Google apps, for that matter.

    The Android most of us see has licensed Google apps like Google Navigation that the manufacturer has to pay for along with customizations to the UI, and then it undergoes another round of customization for the carrier, and my have apps they've licensed - like Bing on the Samsung Fascinate - slapped on.
  18.    #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by taharka View Post
    Yes they do. It's their continued fight against the paperless office.
    Got it. By making it easier for you to print more things from more places in the office/home, more paper (and ink, and did I say paper?) is consumed. It's ingenious!

    Quote Originally Posted by BAYRE
    you forgot to mention that its free

    remember: "Android is a very good OS and its free"
    Thanks for the FREE!! tip!
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by deihmos View Post
    Before the Motorola Droid Android was in the same boat as WebOS but was able to turn things around in a matter of months. So with the right marketing and device the same thing can happen to WebOS. Like I said WebOS has the potential to become very attractive to Business users also. I cannot see a business user using an Android device with that horrible email client and terrible battery life. My Pre was able to outlast the Epic 4G. The Android Market is also filled with so much spam that it is just ridiculous.
    Where do people get this idea that Android was "in the same boat" as WebOS before the Droid arrived? When I purchased my Sprint HTC Hero in October of last year - a month before the Droid arrived - Android was already at 15,000 or so applications, and I immediately had access to Shazam, voice commands and searches, various banking and business apps, and lots of other stuff WebOS still doesn't have. The Android market has only gotten healthier since then, and with that has come spam. NO app store gets to 70-200K applications without junk. Palm's App Catalog has a lot of it in there now, as a matter of fact, and it's under 5K.

    Beyond their way more developed app ecosystem, tho, Android also had the privilege of being the Hero platform for T-Mobile, then Sprint, and now Verizon. Also, worldwide sales of G1s, HTC Heroes and Magic/MyTouch 3G exceeded those of Pre and Pixi devices in the same period.

    Yes, the Droid brought a new level of sales and notoriety, but Android already had a considerable level of penetration and developer support before one Droid was sold.
  20.    #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by deihmos View Post
    Before the Motorola Droid Android was in the same boat as WebOS but was able to turn things around in a matter of months. So with the right marketing and device the same thing can happen to WebOS. Like I said WebOS has the potential to become very attractive to Business users also. When I look at the Android OS I feel like I am looking at Windows 3.1. I cannot see a business user switching to an Android device with that horrible email client, calendar and terrible battery life. My Pre was able to outlast the Epic 4G. The Android Market is also filled with so much spam that it is just ridiculous. The potential is there for Webos.
    Have you actually ever held an Android device in your hand? Your comments are so inaccurate and hyperbole-filled that I feel like you're reading off some Larry Ellison talking points.

    And here we go again with the mythical and mystical "WebOS Potential." In reality, WebOS has done nothing more than re-prove the certainty that an unfinished (but "high potential") OS, on mediocre hardware, without a fully functioning SDK, and no other "special" schtick except to make phone calls, check email, and surf the web like every other smartphone out there, cannot succeed in today's marketplace ... no matter how much advertising someone throws at it.

    YOUR personal experiences with YOUR Pre aside, HP needs to figure out a way to check off that long list of missing pieces in their non-existent ecosystem before they even begin to hope compete in today's marketplace.
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