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  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    FYI.

    Take care,

    Jay

    Tablet War Heats Up
    Mobile Computing | Blog Post | Wayne Rash, Tuesday, August 31, 2010

    Tablet War Heats Up | CTO Edge

    Samsung is going to provide a tablet version of its Android-based Galazy S smartphone for Verizon Wireless later this year. The new tablet will be unveiled in Berlin later this week, and should be part of a pre-Christmas onslaught by Verizon. HP, meanwhile, has announced WebOS 2.0 just in time for the new version of the HP tablet. While the new version of WebOS will also run on the previous Pre smartphones made by Palm, it was an upgrade that was necessary for the OS to work properly in a tablet environment.

    HP will, of course, also release a new version of its venerable Windows tablet, which is aimed at the enterprise market, especially for certain verticals. At this point, itís not clear which carrier will get the HP WebOS tablet. Previous WebOS devices were sold by three of the four major carriers in the U.S. market.

    One thing that is clear is that the tablet market has become more defined as an outgrowth of smartphones rather than laptop computers, which is once where tablets seemed to stem from. The iPad, for example, draws very heavily on the iPhone and iPod Touch and lacks only the ability to make voice calls to keep it from simply being a very large iPhone.

    WebOS devices will have a similar heritage. While Palm originally made handhelds that were the effective predecessors of todayís tablets, itís Palmís smartphones that are morphing into HPís consumer tablets. While it remains to be seen whether a WebOS-based tablet can hold its own against the iPad, it certainly has the ability to do so. WebOS has long been a highly robust mobile operating system with a better selection of enterprise-friendly features than Appleís iOS.

    The problem so far has been that Palmís hardware design and user interface have suffered. Itís likely that with HP at the helm, the WebOS software may find itself in significantly better hardware. HP certainly has the capability to produce such world-class results, but whether it will do so is another one of those open questions.

    The Android tablets from Samsung are a little easier to predict. The Galaxy S devices are available from three of the four major carriers, and all reports are very positive. These are fine devices with an aggressive feature set. Of course, moving the devices to a larger screen might change all of that, as might the finesse required to make the device seem as well-thought-out as Appleís iPad.

    In general, Android devices, while different in philosophy from the Apple devices, are their equal in terms of features, software availability and operation. Apple has more software than Android, but more of the Android apps are free.

    The result, come Christmas, is that weíll likely see three well-designed, highly capable and highly competitive tablets that will be vying for your electronics bucks. The iPad has the head start, but Android devices have been catching up in smartphones. And perhaps HP can produce a tablet thatís sufficiently well done to give the others a run for their money. Itíll be fun to watch, and itíll be interesting to see if any tablet maker can maintain the price points currently demanded by Apple and the iPad. My guess is that weíll see a price war, too. At least we can hope.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    Interesting...the big question is where all of these devices fall into the pricing structure set forth by the iPad?

    From what I can see, Android devices will be ALL OVER the place with Android 1.7, 256mb of RAM, and 2gb of storage on the low end and the Samsung Galaxy pulling out all stops and lining itself right smack beside the iPad with features same or then some.

    My wife has even been looking at the off-brand units coming in droves from China, and even with low end options...stacks pretty will when compared to an iPad running $500 bones for their basic model.

    You got me, but either way thanks for the article, Sorli...
  3.    #4  
    Hi all,

    here is some more info as the TAB WAR grows!

    Take care,

    Jay

    Samsung, Toshiba show off Android tablets to rival iPad

    Faster Forward - Samsung, Toshiba show off Android tablets to rival iPad

    SAN FRANCISCO - Should we read anything into the fact that two competitors to Apple's iPad were introduced so far away from here? Of course not. But that distance does suggest the kind of ground that an iPad competitor (please don't call it an "iPad killer") has to cover.

    Earlier today, Samsung and Toshiba introduced tablets running Google's Android operating system at the IFA trade show in Berlin.

    Samsung's Galaxy Tab features a 7-inch screen, front and back cameras and mobile broadband and runs Android 2.2 (and therefore Adobe's Flash player, unlike the iPad). It weighs 13.4 ounces, a bit lighter than Apple's tablet. Samsung doesn't cite a battery life for the Tab.

    The company says it's due in Europe in the middle of September and will reach the U.S. "in coming months," but hasn't specified prices. Prior reports have suggested Verizon will offer a version of it.

    Toshiba's Folio 100, meanwhile, won't ship until the fourth quarter -- and then only in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Per Engadget's writeup (and the Toshiba news release copied there), it's a larger and heavier device, with a 10.1-inch display and a weight of 1.7 pounds. It runs Android 2.2 and so also Flash and features a Webcam, an SD card slot and HDMI and USB ports. Toshiba estimates its battery life at seven hours of mixed Web browsing, video playback and standby but doesn't cite any prices or a timetable for U.S. availability.

    Weirdly, the Toshiba announcement makes no mention of the Android Market's availability on the device -- it's gone missing on other Android tablets. Instead, Toshiba talks about a "Toshiba Marketplace" -- which, if it comes from the dimwits responsible for the pathetic software bundles the company has deposited on Windows laptops, is about the last feature I'd want on a tablet.

    There are more Android tablets on the way, fortunately. What's on your shopping list for an Android tablet? Post your own requirements in the comments.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  4. #5  
    Is 1024 x 600 an Android screen limitation? If so, that's a serious limitation.
  5. MNotar91's Avatar
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    #6  
    So far none of the Android tabs interest me. I look at the iPad as the tablet to beat (even though it lacks a front face camera, etc.) I don't like the iPad's prcing at all though. I hope to see a WebOS tablet from HP once 2.0 is ready and the quantity of apps on the catalog increases. Pricing will be very important too.
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  6. #7  
    Saying there is a tablet war is extremely optimistic. Apple just ramped up production to 2M per month, with intentions to up that number to 3M. The Galaxy Tab is not yet released, and already, it has lost the American market due to pricing. If you follow Engadget, you know what I'm talking about. If not, pricing has been unofficially announced in some places, and it is well above iPad pricing.

    Combine that fact with the substantially smaller display, less storage, and other weaknesses, the thing is already still-born. On the other end of the scale is the Augin. What you are going to see is probably similar to what is happening in the smartphone arena. Nothing will compete with the iPad. There will just be a bunch of Android clones fighting it out in the second and third tier market. Eventually, all of them, combined, will approach the sales numbers of the iPad.

    As for the upcoming pPad, I suspect it will gleefully join in the race for the bottom. It might even be competitive in the second tier market where tablets exists for no better reason than they can. But there is no way they will be competing with the iPad in any substantive way any time soon.
  7. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    Saying there is a tablet war is extremely optimistic. Apple just ramped up production to 2M per month, with intentions to up that number to 3M. The Galaxy Tab is not yet released, and already, it has lost the American market due to pricing. If you follow Engadget, you know what I'm talking about. If not, pricing has been unofficially announced in some places, and it is well above iPad pricing.
    True...I guess Tablet War is a little overboard since no one really has anything in MASS Production, but then the news has to talk about something and the oil spill news in the gulf subsided for a brief while.

    What's interesting, in my eyes tablets are a Nitch Market. I'm what most people call average financially and it would take a lot to purchase an iPad, PalmPad or otherwise scaling at $500+. Don't get me wrong, I'd love a PalmPad with all the glitz and glamor it deserves, but I'd have to stretch my budget far and wide to afford anything like that in this economy.

    So if I'm the average person in the USA, then people buying iPad units fall into that nitch with Plenty too Spare. Most of us are people who cut coupons, look at the sale ads, and wonder where we can cut corners to last till next month.

    Hopefully HP realizes this and comes out with multiple devices, some with less that cost less and some with more for those who can drop the gravy. Actually, if HP is as good as they sound...maybe they can make the best of both worlds in one unit and provide it a cost that everyone can afford...forcing the iPad pricing model into extinction.

    I don't see it happening and as usual...we'll just have to wait and see. Sorli...
  8. #9  
    Tablets are one area where enterprises will drive the market and just maybe, break the RIM strong hold. My comp pays anywhere from 350.00 to 1,000.00 for IP Deskphones. If we could pay the same amount and get a tab with video and cloud based apps... Bye bye Blackbird, er uh, Blackberry.
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    #10  
    I may just be my opinion but I don't really see the point of tablets...
    They aren't really computers so they can't replace laptops and they are too large to replace cell phones.
    In my opinion they're a bit of luxury item.
    That being said, I wouldn't mind a WebOS tablet...

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