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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by squeezy View Post
    My point is, someone could develop an App that does that for any mobile OS, this really is nothing special. CS5 has a filter that makes photos look like they were shot in HDR.

    The iPhone 4's camera is without a doubt better than most cameras in phones, I am not knocking it. I'm just saying someone in this community could probably pull this off with an App, or down the road when the API is released, incorporate it into a new camera app.
    It sounds like you are doing your best to minimize this feature by suggesting that anyone can do it and it is no big deal. I can't tell if that is jealousy, desperation, or just plain crazy talk. I have a couple of HDR apps on my iPhone 4. They work well and make great images. What Apple has done goes beyond that.

    I also am running 4.1. When you take a picture, the shutter is just as fast as if it were only taking one picture. It is amazingly fast, so no need to hold steady while it tries to take three shots with shaky hands. After snapping the image, it takes a few seconds to process. That's it. Next shot. I am very pleased with the results.

    So, sure, go ahead and pick up an app that is difficult to use for the average point and shooter. Or better yet, go buy $2000 worth of PhotoShop to get the job done. Pretending this is no big deal is just denial.
  2. #22  
    Photography is a hobby of mine. You're not hearing jealousy, desperation, or crazy talk. No matter how fast your shutter is, you cannot use three pictures taken by hand for HDR photography, plain and simple, I wont argue any further. If Apple claims it's camera takes three shots, your post suggests that to me, I and every other photographer would be interested in the software they're using to blend these pictures without too much noise or things being out of place.

    As I said before, I believe they have incorporated a feature in the camera app that applies an HDR filter to the image, nothing else.
  3. #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by squeezy View Post
    No matter how fast your shutter is, you cannot use three pictures taken by hand for HDR photography, plain and simple, ...

    As I said before, I believe they have incorporated a feature in the camera app that applies an HDR filter to the image, nothing else.
    OK, whatever... This sounds a lot like the pedantic arguments that suggest that a thing is not "real" high def because it is not 1080p, or, it is not "real" multi-tasking, or... fill in the blank. What Apple has built into the phone may not be professional level photography, but it is "real" HDR. Regardless of the method they use to achieve it, the end result is what matters. You cannot minimize that, or convince the end user that their photos look less than spectacular. Use the phone. Take a picture. See the result. No technical argument will ever trump that.
  4. #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    What Apple has built into the phone may not be professional level photography, but it is "real" HDR.
    It's really not. It just is approximating it via tone-mapping. It's still a feat in itself, but it's just using one image and adjusting brightness of parts of the image (obviously I'm simplifying) to come out with something that looks sort of like HDR.

    Like I said, other manufacturers should definitely start doing this as well, because it is a pretty nice feature, but it's not real HDR. It's not actually expanding the dynamic range of the picture, but approximating an expanded dynamic range.
  5. #25  
    Really? Do you need to be educated?

    You speak of Hi-def. Let's take that example. I don't know what we're using as an example of "real" HD, but real HD requires 1280 pixels horizontal or 1920 pixels.

    Apple's "real" HDR is hardly anything but software enable photo editing. Real HDR requires three shots, normal exposure, under exposure and over exposure. Here's the catch, the camera CANNOT move in any of these shots, one of which leaves the shutter open for an extended period of time.

    Apple claims it takes the three shots in rapid succession, which I will add cannot be done if they are taking the correct exposures. They say they have a "pretty sophisticated algorithm" to produce their HDR photos.

    For anyone who knows a thing or two about photography, they too will smell something called BS.

    I am not trying to say anything bad about the iPhone 4 and it's capabilities, I am trying to correct the obvious lies Apple is trying to feed people. Take a look at real HDR photos, and then look are you "real" HDR photos and maybe the picture will start to come together.
  6. #26  
    iPhone's "real" HDR on the right



    Real HDR


    Palm Tree by the Water by joel8x, on Flickr
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by squeezy View Post
    Apple claims it takes the three shots in rapid succession
    It doesn't even claim that. It claims multiple 'exposures' are combined, and it's simple to under or overexpose the image in software.
  8. #28  
    squeezy, that is exactly the kind of pedantic techno babble that wins the battle and loses the war. Friend, trust me on this one. When people see the pictures coming out of this thing, they will not give a rip about your "real" HDR argument.

    Tip, if you want to smack talk a competitor, you might want to choose something that does not sound like crazy talk after a simple demo of the feature.

    I gladly concede the "real" HDR argument. You win... but not really.
  9. #29  
    According to this article

    AppleInsider | First look: Taking HDR photos with Apple's iOS 4.1

    The Author seems to be the one saying it, not Apple. I would really have to watch the Keynote to see if Jobs makes that claim or if the author is this article does.
  10. #30  
    Call it pedantic if you wish, but the difference is night and day, and I know you see can see that with your own eyes in my above post.

    Trust me on this, when I show off my portfolio to friends and they get to my HDR shots, they will be a hell of a lot more impressed than by these slightly prettied up pictures that you can barely tell a difference in.

    I wasn't trying to "win" any argument, rather I was trying to inform those which are ill informed. Take it however you want, though.
  11. #31  
    Quote Originally Posted by squeezy View Post
    Trust me on this, when I show off my portfolio to friends and they get to my HDR shots, they will be a hell of a lot more impressed than by these slightly prettied up pictures that you can barely tell a difference in.
    Bro, I love the fact that you are comparing your semi-pro rig, enhanced by CS5: one of the more expensive photo editing programs on the planet, to the stock camera of the iPhone 4. Even you have to see the humor in that. You are really not helping your case and should probably quit digging.

    I'm off to bed. Good night, all.
  12. #32  
    You really should read more carefully. I never said I use CS5 for photo editing. I only mentioned CS5 has a filter feature that takes one single photo and makes it look as if it were taken in HDR. It is a very simple filter that other programs have as well.

    I fail to see the humor in that, maybe the part where you misread what I wrote and brought a negative attitude with your error.

    Good night.
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    #33  
    The problem here is that "HDR" actually MEANS something, and what the iPhone is doing is not actually HDR. HDR is High Dynamic Range. These photos are retaining their original dynamic range and thus cannot be true HDR.
  14. #34  
    Quote Originally Posted by squeezy View Post
    Photography is a hobby of mine. You're not hearing jealousy, desperation, or crazy talk. No matter how fast your shutter is, you cannot use three pictures taken by hand for HDR photography, plain and simple, I wont argue any further. If Apple claims it's camera takes three shots, your post suggests that to me, I and every other photographer would be interested in the software they're using to blend these pictures without too much noise or things being out of place.

    As I said before, I believe they have incorporated a feature in the camera app that applies an HDR filter to the image, nothing else.
    Sqeezy, I don't really have a dog in this fight, but the HDR app I have actually specifies that they do NOT do this: they don't simply take an image and apply a filter but it blends multiples shots. You actually select the exposure for each image. It's called PROhdr.

    Pro HDR for iPhone 3GS

    I have no doubt a professional photographer with dedicated equipment does a much better job.

    But it doesn't take away that the results are amazing.
  15.    #35  
    Quote Originally Posted by squeezy View Post
    Photography is a hobby of mine. You're not hearing jealousy, desperation, or crazy talk. No matter how fast your shutter is, you cannot use three pictures taken by hand for HDR photography, plain and simple, I wont argue any further. If Apple claims it's camera takes three shots, your post suggests that to me, I and every other photographer would be interested in the software they're using to blend these pictures without too much noise or things being out of place.

    As I said before, I believe they have incorporated a feature in the camera app that applies an HDR filter to the image, nothing else.
    Photography is also a hobby of mine (I have a 5d MkII) and taking three shots in a well lit area without a tripod is very feasible.

    Here's an HDR photo I took that was actually comprised of 5 different shots without a tripod.

    Last edited by barkerja; 09/05/2010 at 01:21 AM.
  16. #36  
    I have fairly limited knowledge of photography, but have done manual hdr work, so this all i will say...

    "Hdr" on the iphone, Isn't the same as "real" hdr. The results, aren't even close. IT does improve how the shots look, and isn't a waste of time, but does not even come close to the results that can be achieved through manual work.

    let's stop arguing over if it's technically hdr, or not, and agree that it makes the shots look a little bit better, but doesn't even come close to what "real" hdr does. (personally, I wouldn't call it hdr, but there are over 120 million people that are going to call it that, and I don't have the time to argue with more than 6-8 million people )
  17. #37  
    barkerja, I am very impressed that you took those by hand. What software do you use to merge the images? I am on a budget and use Photomatrix. In my experience, a tripod isn't enough, I have to pull out my shutter release cable to ensure there isn't the slightest bit of movement. Before I used the shutter release cable all of my images would be blurry in a lot of areas and crisp in a few.

    Very nice photo

    Edit: Very nice album!
  18.    #38  
    Quote Originally Posted by squeezy View Post
    barkerja, I am very impressed that you took those by hand. What software do you use to merge the images? I am on a budget and use Photomatrix. In my experience, a tripod isn't enough, I have to pull out my shutter release cable to ensure there isn't the slightest bit of movement. Before I used the shutter release cable all of my images would be blurry in a lot of areas and crisp in a few.

    Very nice photo

    Edit: Very nice album!
    First, thank you.

    It's really trial and error. I use photomatrix occasionally but generally use Photoshop. A great tutorial with Photoshop can be found here: Photoshop HDR tutorial. hdri, High Dynamic Range Photography. | Merging HDR in Photoshop CS3, CS4 Tutorial

    If you're outside and your subject consist of minimal shadows/dark areas with an exposure of ... oh I'd say no less than 1/125 it's very feasible to take multiple exposure shots for an HDR photo handheld. I do it all the time and get great shots.

    A good example of nice shot even with some HDR flaws (the people):

    Sitting down at The Embarcadero by barkerja, on Flickr
  19.    #39  
    I just picked up an iPhone 4 the other day and have been avidly using the HDR function within the camera. This pic I took today leads me to believe that it does indeed take consecutive shots and then merges them to produce the HDR photo.

    This was taken in a moving car, hence why it has the ghosting effect. The bottom photo is the original. When the iPhone takes an HDR photo, it saves two files (if you have it enabled to in the settings) –*the original and the HDR version.


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