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  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    This could come in handy.

    Take care,

    jay

    DeviceVM App Runs Windows on an Apple iPad
    August 27, 2010 -By Mark Hachman

    DeviceVM App Runs Windows on an Apple iPad - OS, Software & Networking by ExtremeTech

    On Friday, DeviceVM launched Splashtop Remote for the iPad, a pair of client and software apps that allows a user to remotely control a Windows PC via the iPad interface.

    Although some Apple fans may recoil at the shock of sullying their Apple technology with a Windows interface, company executives positioned the app as a way to access sites and applications that Apple currently blocks, or to turn an old laptop or netbook into a media server.

    And in the future, the company plans to release a version for the iPhone and the Android platform, supporting future Android tablets. DeviceVM could also extend the functionality to future phones, offering the app as a native application for new Android smartphones, similar to the custom apps that Sprint has installed on the EVO 4G.

    Splashtop Remote for the iPad will cost $6.99 for the first month, and $19.99 thereafter, according to Sergei Krupenin, the senior director of marketing for DeviceVM. The "server" portion of the app, which runs on a PC powered by Windows XP, Windows Vista, or Windows 7, is free. The app has been approved by Apple and will appear in the App Store on Friday.

    An update due in a few weeks will offer some tweaks to improve Windows XP performance and probably add iPhone support as well, Krupenin said.

    DeviceVM's claim to fame is Splashtop, a pre-boot Linux OS shell that allows near-instant access to the Web and other functions before Windows loads. But the software is most often branded with the name of the OEM that uses it. Customers include Acer, Asus, Dell, HP, Lenovo, LG, and Sony.

    When the software is installed on both the client and server PC, a user logs in and connects the two machines via either a wireless network or over the iPad's 3G connection. The iPad runs the Windows desktop in full screen, with only the small keyboard icon in the lower right to distinguish the two. In a demonstration, typing into a Word document was generally smooth, but with a few spurts and pauses via the connection.

    "Why can't I get to the PC? How can I get to the file?" Krupenin said. "Sometimes I want access to 80 gigabytes of music and video, not just the 16 [that comes with the iPad]. Sometimes I want to be able to get to Outlook on the road. We actually think this is going to be a very handy feature several years out," when more tablets come into the market, he said. For now, however, the iPad is expected to dominate the tablet market.

    Since Windows isn't inherently touch based, Splashtop Remote uses gestures to simulate mouse clicks: a tap for a left click, and a tap-and-hold for a right click. Some interfaces are actually improved via touch, like navigating between tabs, Krupenin said. Users can also "slide" the screen around while the iPad's soft keyboard is in use.

    And, for those who really want it, the Windows interface offers access to Adobe Flash, long a target of Apple's ire. On a demonstration at a local Starbucks, Hulu.com would not load over a 3G connection, but did so using the coffeehouse's Wi-Fi connection, courtesy of AT&T.

    Users have two display options when using Splashtop Remote, which can be toggled back and forth with a two-finger "dial" gesture. A video-optimized mode degrades the resolution slightly, but optimizes the display for smooth video playback, while a "text mode" tries to present the sharpest resolution possible. Naturally, the iPad, via the Windows PC, can access any attached devices.

    Cloud computing is becoming pervasive, whether it be online storage, apps, or remote gaming services like OnLive. Now, you can add the Splashtop software to that list.

    "We feel that this is going to be the way the world works," Krupenin said. "Your laptop or desktop will remain on your desk, and you'll carry a small tablet around with you."
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert View Post

    Splashtop Remote for the iPad will cost $6.99 for the first month, and $19.99 thereafter, according to Sergei Krupenin, the senior director of marketing for DeviceVM. The "server" portion of the app, which runs on a PC powered by Windows XP, Windows Vista, or Windows 7, is free. The app has been approved by Apple and will appear in the App Store on Friday.

    too bloody expensive -- $20/mo. ?? they must bonkers
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  3. #3  
    Agreed. Way too expensive. I will however check it out later.
  4. #4  
    Easier and cheaper to do using your own PC:
    PocketCloud
    Mocha VNC
    EasyConnect

    Plenty more just like those too.

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