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  1.    #1  
    HI all,

    This is interesting. This firm has done work for Apple & Palm!

    Take care,

    Jay

    Developer of Tablets Loses Apple as Customer
    By MIGUEL HELFT, August 26, 2010

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/27/te...gewanted=print

    SAN FRANCISCO — Apple severed ties with a small Silicon Valley design firm that for nearly a decade had helped with the development of some of its products, after the firm showcased its own prototype tablet computer.

    Eric Bauswell, a founder and chief executive of the engineering design company SurfaceInk, confirmed on Thursday that his company and Apple had “gone separate directions.”

    Mr. Bauswell declined to give details of its relationship with Apple, citing client confidentiality agreements. But he said that his company was let go because of “Apple’s growing awareness of our turnkey capabilities,” referring to SurfaceInk’s business of designing products for its clients. “I think they view our capabilities as an opportunity for competitors, “ he said.

    Apple declined to comment.

    The incident underscores the growing pressure that Apple is facing in the market for tablet computers. While the iPad currently dominates that market, many rival products are expected to be released soon.

    SurfaceInk, a company founded in 1999, has done engineering design work in the past for clients — and Apple competitors — like Palm and Hewlett-Packard. The company, which has about 50 employees, also has a so-called turnkey business, which creates products and licenses them to other companies.

    It was that latest part of SurfaceInk’s business, which the company began about five years ago, that apparently unsettled Apple. While SurfaceInk had gotten clients mostly through word of mouth, in June it publicized a prototype 12.1-inch tablet during an electronics trade show.

    The device was meant to showcase SurfaceInk’s design capabilities to potential clients, Mr. Bauswell said. He said that Apple viewed those capabilities as a potential competitive threat.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    Competetitive threat?

    Isnt that called "Free market capitalism"?

    More likely, they put themselves into a situation that created a "conflict of interest", in Apple's eyes.. (polite way of saying "you can only do what you do for me, and no one else, but I won't pay you for that exclusivity").

    Im not sure I agree, however, as, if Apple wanted them exclusively for themselves, they would have contracted them to those terms and paid handsomely for it, or bought them, outright.

    Should be interesting to watch.. I can see all sorts of fallout from this, including Apple carefully watching what this company does to see if anything they feel is THEIR IP is being sold to its competitors.
    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  3. #3  
    Awww... what's a matter CrApple? Afraid people will stop being brainwashed idiots and see though your bull?
    My Summer Motto: "When Nature turns off the damn heat I'll turn off my A/C"
  4. #4  
    You think a company should do business with a company who is a competitor in the same segment in which they do business together?

    You guys are crazy, or just crazy-bad in business, if you think this is a bad thing.
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by LCGuy View Post
    Competetitive threat?

    Isnt that called "Free market capitalism"?

    More likely, they put themselves into a situation that created a "conflict of interest", in Apple's eyes.. (polite way of saying "you can only do what you do for me, and no one else, but I won't pay you for that exclusivity").

    Im not sure I agree, however, as, if Apple wanted them exclusively for themselves, they would have contracted them to those terms and paid handsomely for it, or bought them, outright.

    Should be interesting to watch.. I can see all sorts of fallout from this, including Apple carefully watching what this company does to see if anything they feel is THEIR IP is being sold to its competitors.
    You sure did read a bunch of theories into that story, didn't you? Like:
    1. Apple wanted exclusivity and didn't pay for it.
    2. Apple should have included exclusivity in their contract with SurfaceInk, but didn't.
    3. Apple would have paid 'handsomely' for exclusivity.

    Sounds to me like SurfaceInk, an 11-year-old company with a 10-year-old relationship with Apple screwed the pooch. I hope whatever they did to alienate their first big client was worth it to them. It's not as if Apple really needs SurfaceInk to succeed.
  6. #6  
    Finngirl;

    No one sayd Apple "Should" do business with these guys... they already did, and decided to stop.

    The reasons why are only speculated above.. only Apple knows why, for sure, and they have resoundingly answered with a "no comment".

    However, I will say this:

    In business, the friend of my enemy isnt necessarily ALWAYS my enemy!

    Then, there's always this one, which is fairly popular in corporate logic these days:

    "keep your friends close, and you renemies closer".

    Case in point:

    HTC made some old Palm OS phones, makes WinMo phones, and Android Phones. Following your logic, Microsoft should NOT do any sort of business with HTC, then, right?

    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    You sure did read a bunch of theories into that story, didn't you? Like:
    1. Apple wanted exclusivity and didn't pay for it.
    2. Apple should have included exclusivity in their contract with SurfaceInk, but didn't.
    3. Apple would have paid 'handsomely' for exclusivity.

    Sounds to me like SurfaceInk, an 11-year-old company with a 10-year-old relationship with Apple screwed the pooch. I hope whatever they did to alienate their first big client was worth it to them. It's not as if Apple really needs SurfaceInk to succeed.

    Kupe;

    Nah.. read my post again. My comment was to rationalize that its more than likely that this little company put themselves into a position of "conflict of interest" (see my post above.. no partial quotes now!).

    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    It's also likely that Apple offered to buy the company and its IP, however, the company may have felt that its technology was more valuable to Apple's competitors given how desperate they are to get their own tablets out there. In that case, Apple would be crazy to work with them anymore.
    if their IP was truly important and valuable, surely Apple would have bought them.

    Price would not have been an obstacle -- unless personal pique was.

    (no one wants to be on the wrong side of Steve ...)
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by LCGuy View Post
    HTC made some old Palm OS phones, makes WinMo phones, and Android Phones. Following your logic, Microsoft should NOT do any sort of business with HTC, then, right?


    Only if HTC is developing and launching their own OS.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by finngirl View Post
    Only if HTC is developing and launching their own OS.
    finngirl;

    Well, they sorta have - its an overlay called "sense UI".

    And they were one of the Palm bidders.

    But, ok, try this one for size:

    HP just bought Palm. HP announced that they WILL be making WebOS smartphones, and a WebOS slate, both of which compete directly with Microsoft, and could be HUGE problems for them, if they succeed in the market.

    So, ergo, Microsoft should not do any business with HP?

    Look, there are a ton of situations like this, all over the place - its "real world" business -that's the truth.

    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  11. #11  
    Actually, sounds like HP IS ditching Microsoft in certain areas.

    No question in very large companies with many divisions the picture gets muddied. But there is a huge difference between "doing business with" and actually being privy to your strategy and IP.



    But if you want to release your proprietary product information and strategies - as Apple does with a consultant contractor who develops for them - who then informs you via a trade show that they are launching a product that competes with what you work on with them, go right ahead!
  12. #12  
    "Enemies" work together all the time in business. Business relationships begin and end all the time.

    Nothing to see here, people. Keep it moving

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