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  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    While doing a web search on Dell's new Aero, I was struck by the fact that all of the reviews so far are disappointing. I am surprised that Dell's 1st attempt at a smart phone would turn out so poorly. Perhaps they will turning it around with their next phone! Why Droid OS 1.5 ?????????????? They doomed it from the get go, by using an outdated OS!

    Take care,

    Jay

    Article One:

    Dell's death-wish Android Aero
    Rob Pegoraro, Washington Post Fast Forward, August 24, 2010; 4:55 PM ET

    Faster Forward - Dell's death-wish Android Aero

    I thought something was missing when I read the news release that arrived this morning from Dell, touting a new smartphone running Google's Android operating system. The specifications listed there made its Aero ($99.99 for new or renewing AT&T customers) look impressive enough, but they left out one detail: what version of Android came on the phone.

    So did the listing for the phone on Dell's site.

    Not good: Companies don't omit such an important detail if it's anything worth bragging about. My suspicions were proved right when Dell publicist Kristin Calcagno replied that the Aero runs "a superset" of Android 1.5.

    The added features she touted--for example, handwriting recognition and "one-click upload of photos to social sites"--could be interesting, but Android 1.5? Today? Really?

    For those unfamiliar with the progress of Google's smartphone software, Android 1.5 dates to April 2009. Almost all phones now ship with Android 2.1, and (far too) few bundle the 2.2 release Google introduced in May. The seemingly small difference in version numbers hides dramatic improvements in responsiveness, battery life, support for third-party apps, networking and multimedia.

    (Trust me on that. I bought an Android 1.5 phone last winter; the 2.1 update that arrived in May was the next-best thing to getting a new phone.)

    To ship an Android phone in August 2010 with 1.5 installed is a rough equivalent of shipping a new laptop with Windows XP preinstalled. Except on that laptop, you could then go out and buy a copy of the far-better Windows 7. With the Aero, as with other Android phones that have been "customized" by manufacturers who think they can out-program Google's developers, you'll have to wait for Dell to ship an update tailored for its tweaks.

    And Dell won't even say if it will do that, much less talk scheduling: "We have not announced any plans for an upgrade path," Calcagno wrote in a follow-up.

    The Aero could be a worthy phone in some ways. But until Dell gets serious about keeping up with the rest of the smartphone industry, my stance on it is simple: Don't buy this phone.


    Article Two:


    Dell's Aero Smartphone: An Embarrassment to Android
    JR Raphael, Tuesday, August 24, 2010 02:55 PM PDT

    Dell's Aero Smartphone: An Embarrassment to Android - PCWorld

    Dell's new Aero smartphone ships with Android 1.5, a 16-month-old version of the Android operating system. No matter how you look at it, there's just no excuse for that.

    Often times, the announcement of a new Android phone is cause for excitement. Occasionally, though, a phone's arrival inspires little more than a sigh.

    Today's revelation of the Dell Aero is one of those sigh-inducing sorts of occasions. The Aero, officially announced this morning, is Dell's first stab at the smartphone market (by Dell's definitions, at least -- the company released the Streak earlier this month, but it insists the 5-inch call-making device is a tablet and not a phone). Billed as "one of the lightest Android smartphones in the U.S.," the Aero is now available for $99.99 with a two-year contract from AT&T.

    So why the harsh words? It's not because of the Aero's unremarkable hardware -- the phone runs on a 624MHz processor, a significant step down from the 1GHz chip used in most top-notch Android offerings these days -- but rather because of the software Dell has chosen to load onto the device.

    The Aero, you see, runs on Android 1.5 -- an early version of Google's mobile operating system that's 16 months out of date and a lifetime behind in functionality and performance. For a brand new phone to be shipping with a year-old version of Android is simply embarrassing, both to Dell and to the image of the Android brand.

    Dell's Aero Smartphone: An Outdated Android

    Android 1.5 -- or "Cupcake," as it's nicknamed -- debuted in April of 2009, just six months after Google's first Android phone entered the world. Android has made leaps and bounds in growth and development since then, with four significant upgrades to the core operating system.

    We're not talking about small stuff here: Android's user interface has been revamped, countless features have been added in, and the overall system speed has been boosted numerous times in the releases since 1.5. Dell may have given the Aero some bells and whistles of its own -- a handwriting recognition utility, for example, and a "Flash Lite-enhanced" version of the Android browser -- but it can't make up for the months of innovation and improvement it's shutting out.

    No matter how you look at it, a phone with Android 1.5 is going to be slower and significantly less advanced than a device with a recent version of the OS. And it's going to be crippled when it comes to third-party applications, too, as plenty of apps require Android 2.0 or higher to operate. Some, such as Google's new Voice Actions voice-command system, won't run on anything less than Android 2.2.

    And while the high-end Android phones may cost closer to $200, price is no excuse: For $49.99, half the price of the Aero, you could get Verizon's LG Ally phone. It ships with Android 2.1 and is already confirmed to be in line for the Android 2.2 upgrade. Even within AT&T, known for its less-than-wholehearted embrace of Android, you could snag the HTC Aria with Android 2.1 for an extra 30 bucks.

    Dell's Aero and the Bigger Android Picture

    The Aero actually isn't Dell's first Android-related offense. The Streak, Dell's 5-inch-gadget-that-makes-calls-but-isn't-a-phone, launched with Android 1.6 about a week and a half ago. That isn't much better.

    This trend is precisely why I've argued that it's time for the baked-in Android UI to die. Companies like Dell (and also Sony Ericsson, with its recent Xperia 10 AT&T Android phone) spend so much time working on their modifications to the Android software that their devices are outdated by the time they debut. And even manufacturers that manage to do better with the release cycle tend to be extra slow on rolling out upgrades, thanks to the extensive software adjustments required with each release. The phone-makers may be trying to put their own marks on Android, but the manner in which they're going about it ultimately does a disservice to their users. (And yes, there is a better way.)

    Trying to sell a new phone with Android 1.5 is like trying to sell a new PC with Windows Me. Even if you're selling it for slightly less than the top-of-the-line models down the aisle, it's ridiculous, it's silly -- and it's completely inexcusable.


    Come on, Dell. You can do better than that.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    HAHAHAHA cant expect this kind of stupidity from Dell. But I am sure, they do something better than this.
    With the help of Online Quran Classes, we can promote the teachings of Islam in all over the world.
  3. #3  
    This is the sort of thing I would expect from Dell.
  4. #4  
    The Aero seems like an indication of Dell's lack of market agility. This is the phone they should have released 2 years ago - what have they been doing since then?
  5. #5  
    Dell is the poster child for the compulsion of OEMs to "mark" the Android UI as their own.

    OEMs do not want to be generic gadget builders -- which is why they do this.

    Unfortunately its a destructive form of "marking" --- more akin to peeing on a hydrant.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  6. #6  
    It's amazing that a company with Dell's resources can announce this thing, then can't get it to the US market until almost 9 months later and in an essentially unchanged form from CES. Looks like the lag from announcement-to-market will be similar for their Thunder Android and Windows Phone 7 handsets too.

    I really, really, really hope HP can pull the trigger quicker with their upcoming WebOS handsets.
  7. #7  


    Slow down, Big Fellow
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikah912 View Post
    It's amazing that a company with Dell's resources can announce this thing, then can't get it to the US market until almost 9 months later and in an essentially unchanged form from CES. Looks like the lag from announcement-to-market will be similar for their Thunder Android and Windows Phone 7 handsets too.

    I really, really, really hope HP can pull the trigger quicker with their upcoming WebOS handsets.
    I'm sure all the webOS folks leaving since the buyout won't slow them down at all
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert View Post
    I am surprised that Dell's 1st attempt at a smart phone would turn out so poorly.
    ....wasnt their first attempt the Streak? o.o
  10. ChanceNC's Avatar
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    #10  
    Not surprising at all. The Dell stuff I've owned has been junk and they continue to churn out junk every day. Their attempt at MP3 players several years back was a complete joke. They built a big shiny new plant a couple counties away to build desktops...at a time when everyone and their mothers were switching to laptops as their primary computers. The plant will be closed before too long. Dell has totally lost their way...which is a shame.
  11. #11  
    Dell seems have been having a ruff run of it with the faulty capacity coverup lawsuit, bad press and lagging mindshare. Dell made an impressive splash years ago with their Axim pda brand. I still have my ole x50v sitting around and it was the best WM pda I had ever owned back in the day. I disagree with the article posted above stating that OEMs should quite trying to customize andriod on top of default OS. HTC has its skin and other OEM need to do as well to rise above the sameness...
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  12.    #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by BobKy View Post


    Slow down, Big Fellow
    LOL catch me if you can, take care, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  13. #13  
    I am only thrilled that my organization is no longer order only Dell. In the last 5 years, hundreds of capacitor issues, projectors (mounted on the ceiling that lock up and require unplugging), crap Lexmark printers with Dell's names on them with faulty sensors causes numerous paper jams, Bad loud Dvd/CD burners, laptop internal power converter burn outs.

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