Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1.    #1  
    Businesses Add iPads to Their Briefcases
    Some Companies, Which Barred the iPhone, Build Apps for Tablet Computer and Give Apple Gadget to Employees
    By BEN WORTHEN

    When Apple Inc.'s first iPhone came out in 2007, many companies told their employees that the device wasn't appropriate for the workplace. The iPad is a different story.

    The company's tablet-style device seems to be sidestepping the resistance that the iPhone and other consumer-oriented devices have faced in the corporate environment. Indeed, many businesses have raced to snap up iPads.

    View Full Image

    James Yang
    One example is the Chicago law firm Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP, which banned the iPhone when it first came out yet preordered 10 iPads in the run up to the tablet's release in April.

    "We made sure that we knew as much about these devices as possible," said Michael Barnas, the firm's director of application services. The technology department now offers access to its internal systems for more than 50 iPad-toting attorneys, and anticipates issuing iPads as an alternative to laptops as soon as next year.

    Apple, which said it sold more than three million iPads through the end of June, attributes some of the device's success to businesses. The Cupertino, Calif., company's Chief Operating Officer Tim Cook said in July that "very surprisingly" half of the Fortune 100 are testing or deploying iPads.

    More than 500 of the 11,000-plus applications built specifically for the iPad are in the business category. A free app from Citrix Systems Inc., which allows people to access internal corporate programs from the iPad, has been downloaded more than 145,000 times.

    "Everyone in IT is jumping on this one," said Ted Schadler, an analyst at Forrester Research. "Rather than wait for people to start complaining they're saying why don't we get a few of them in and see what they are good for."

    Companies have often imposed policies against consumer-oriented technologiesóranging from thumb drives to Web-based email accountsóbecause of worries that include keeping corporate data secure and other impact on internal computing systems. But many employees defied rules and used these tools anyway, partly out of a belief they improved productivity, said Mr. Schadler. In many cases, IT departments eventually relented and relaxed their rules.

    EXPERIENCE WSJ PROFESSIONALEditors' Deep Dive: Firms Adopt Smartphones, Tablets
    ENTERTAINMENT CLOSE-UP
    Move's Real Estate 'Area Highlighter' iPhone Feature
    DOW JONES NEWS SERVICE
    New Fronts Open Up In Smartphone Turf War
    GANNETT NEWS SERVICE
    Market Researchers Get New Tool in iPad
    Access thousands of business sources not available on the free web. Learn More
    Businesses are behaving differently with the iPad, in large part because the new device is starting out as more of a known quantity from a technical standpoint. The iPad runs the same operating software as the iPhone, which has been enhanced with a number of business-friendly features.

    The iPhone, at the outset, faced the hurdle that it didn't work with Exchange, the Microsoft Corp. email software that is a mainstay of the business world. Nor could information-technology managers remotely erase data on the handset in the event it was stolen or lost.

    But Apple has addressed these and other issues, including the ability for companies to encrypt information on iPhones and set up secure ways for employees to connect to corporate networks. The latest version of the operating system used by the iPhone and iPad adds features that make the devices easier for a tech department to manage, including the ability for businesses to distribute internally developed apps without going through Apple's App Store.

    IPads, with list prices ranging from $499 to $829, are also less expensive than the laptop computers most companies buy. They also have advantages over laptops for certain chores, such as when employees work standing up or give demonstrations.

    For example, Mercedes-Benz Financial, which provides loans and leases for Daimler AG, has equipped some dealerships with an iPad loaded with its app. The goal is to begin the credit-application process while customers are standing near a vehicle.

    Bausch & Lomb Inc., which makes eye-care products, built its own iPad app for its salespeople. The company said it had about 50 employees using iPads in the field within a week and a half of the device's release.

    One selling point is that the iPad starts up much more quickly than laptops and has a longer-lasting battery. "We don't get a lot of time in front of a customer," said Simon Woods, Bausch & Lomb's vice president of global technologies and applications.

    When the iPhone came out three years ago "many of us were skeptical" that it could be a business tool, said Sean Chai, senior IT manager at Kaiser Permanente, the health-care organization based in Oakland, Calif.

    But when the iPad was announced, Kaiser preordered a pair, and it has since been testing them in a 37,000-square-foot technology lab. Among the uses so far are viewing medical images such as X-rays and CT scans, and accessing medical records through a trial version of an iPad app developed by the electronic-record system's maker.

    Kaiser is also testing a tablet specifically designed for hospitals, but so far is impressed by the iPad. "Apple didn't design this for the health-care industry," said Mr. Chai. "But it's a tremendous form factor."

    Write to Ben Worthen at ben.worthen@wsj.com



    Read more: Businesses Add iPad to Their Briefcase - WSJ.com
  2. #2  
    so with no true built in security... if i found one of these sitting in a train i pick it up... and just swipe to unlock? Lets hope we don't see any financial institutions use these things! heck even a webOS tablet should not be used for important secure tasks..
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by antonio3 View Post
    so with no true built in security... if i found one of these sitting in a train i pick it up... and just swipe to unlock? Lets hope we don't see any financial institutions use these things! heck even a webOS tablet should not be used for important secure tasks..
    It's a little bit better than what you assume. The user can establish a 4 digit pin that is required after a user-defined interval (including every time you place the iPad into standby). The device will then either lock up or self-wipe (user choice) if the PIN is entered incorrectly 10 times in-a-row. Not as robust as a laptop for casual snoopers, but more effective than a laptop (and its vulnerable hard drive) if stolen unless the laptop is also encrypted.
  4. #4  
    Haven't all these businesses heard? The iPad has no USB ports, printer support, fast app switching, or Flash! Guess those things weren't so important after all. Can't wait to see the pPad that is 2" thick, weighing in at 3lb, with a slide out keyboard.
  5.    #5  
    The reason why businesses are embracing these devices is that their employees are going to use them anyway since the devices are so versatile. What you can do with iPads on a plane, alone, makes them worth having with the outrageous battery life, portability, media capability, etc. Finally, iPads are so simple to use that it probably requires a lot less IT support.

    And a keyboard case For The Win!

  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    And a keyboard case For The Win!

    In the words of Steve Jobs, Boom!
  7. #7  
    The form factor lends itself to specialized applications like standup field work where companies build a custom app to be used. It could really become a top notch supply chain management tool, for example.

    Buuuuuut, absent that, it's still a non-starter for most enterprise operations given the amount of Windows corporate security software, non-networked printing, and just ancient, cobbled-together tech that powers the largest firms in this country (I work for one such biggie that has a market cap a wee bit over half of Hewlett-Packard's). A number of my team members have iPads here. They use them to take meeting notes and log in to Exchange, and they paid for them with their own money.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    Haven't all these businesses heard? The iPad has no USB ports, printer support, fast app switching, or Flash! Guess those things weren't so important after all. Can't wait to see the pPad that is 2" thick, weighing in at 3lb, with a slide out keyboard.
    -I print fine from my iPad.
    -fast app switching coming in about a month
    -No flash = good
  9. #9  
    The iPad: As Insecure As The iPhone | threatpost

    iPhone too insecure for a life of crime - Gizmo will grass you up | TechEye

    it's good for a lot of things... but if someone really wants to take this out of the office.. they should be careful depending on what is stored on it... heck there is a keylogger built into the OS. As i'm sure there is some type of logger built into ours as well (spell checking and the such). Just saying.. last thing we need is some ***** from a car dealership leaving full access to Fords customer accounts on one of these.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by antonio3 View Post
    The iPad: As Insecure As The iPhone | threatpost

    iPhone too insecure for a life of crime - Gizmo will grass you up | TechEye

    it's good for a lot of things... but if someone really wants to take this out of the office.. they should be careful depending on what is stored on it... heck there is a keylogger built into the OS. As i'm sure there is some type of logger built into ours as well (spell checking and the such). Just saying.. last thing we need is some ***** from a car dealership leaving full access to Fords customer accounts on one of these.
    Everything you're saying here goes the same for a laptop /netbook computer. The bottom line is, if you lose possession of a device and that device contains critical information you don't want getting out, then you're in a world of hurt.
  11. Speebs's Avatar
    Posts
    297 Posts
    Global Posts
    403 Global Posts
    #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    Everything you're saying here goes the same for a laptop /netbook computer. The bottom line is, if you lose possession of a device and that device contains critical information you don't want getting out, then you're in a world of hurt.
    ...if it is not encrypted.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by Speebs View Post
    ...if it is not encrypted.
    Perhaps - depending on the encryption used. You might be depressed at how easy many encryption schemes are to break. And an erased iPad is pretty hard to read.
  13. #13  
    Still it can't be used in third world countries in businesses.
    With the help of Online Quran Classes, we can promote the teachings of Islam in all over the world.

Posting Permissions