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  1.    #1  
    ...and this is before they even redesign the UI.

    Google Voice Actions for mobile announced: write messages, find music, and more -- Engadget

    Swiping and moving cards is nifty, no doubt, but it's hard to come up with a more efficient input method than talking.

    Here's the first (of two promised) announcements from Google Mobile's little get-together: voice actions. In a nutshell, it's a more expansive API similar to iPhone voice control. So far we've seen a couple applications for it: "send message to [person] [message]," "call Millennium Knightsbridge in London" for a location-specific phone call. You can also set alarms, go straight to a website ("go to Wikipedia"), speak addresses or locations for directions. Find music is particularly interesting and works across multiple apps, looking for tunes across the web, too. In this example, "find music by The Decemberists" brought up the option to create a Pandora station. Speaking "Note to self," however cliche, creates a message reminder for you later." Blue words in a spoken message highlight potential errors that you can fix via more standard input mechanisms. It'll come pre-installed on Droid 2 and should be available via the Android Market: look for "voice search."
  2. #2  
    Yeah except at some point webOS will have voice commands and Android will still be, well, Android.

    But the sooner the better cause voice command is a great feature.
  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by foosball View Post
    Yeah except at some point webOS will have voice commands and Android will still be, well, Android.

    But the sooner the better cause voice command is a great feature.
    Voice command with this level of integration isn't really on any OS except Android. HP is welcome to bolt-on voice command to WebOS whenever, but it will not function to this degree for the foreseeable future.
  4. #4  
    You know what makes Voice useless? When you talk and it either doesn't understand or thinks you said something else and takes you to the wrong place. NO THANK YOU. I'll stick with my cards thanks.
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikah912 View Post
    ...HP is welcome to bolt-on voice command to WebOS whenever, but it will not function to this degree for the foreseeable future.
    Maybe, maybe not....the only people who know right now are HP. If HP's VP Rahul Sood has anything to do with anything, we know he wants to see this on webOS.

    All that said I'm still not sure I see myself using voice search anywhere I wouldn't be using the speakerphone.....which is a lot of places.
    Sprint|Samsung Epic
  6. #6  
    Voice activation sounds really neat but lets be honest. Other than voice dialing would you really use it that much? I don't think I would. The one thing I've found voice activation software to be the best at is raising my blood pressure when it screws up.

    It's interesting to watch the features people consider 'cool' and 'neat' coming out on smart phones. IMHO, many of the features end up being almost useless.
  7.    #7  
    Just for the sake of clarity, we should dismiss this rather remarkable OS progression because:

    A) We're going to get it on WebOS (no one from HP or Palm has said this, but I digress...) and we should only be excited about it then.
    B) I didn't want that stupid old feature anyway because I used far crappier voice search apps on older equipment that have nothing to do with this and weren't integrated into every aspect of the OS, and I didn't like it!


    or....

    C) It's for a competing platform.

    Be honest.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by foosball View Post
    Yeah except at some point webOS will have voice commands and Android will still be, well, Android.

    But the sooner the better cause voice command is a great feature.
    A year ago this kind of comment might have still held some weight, but after a year of "WebOS is gonna get that soon" responses to a plethora of unanswered WebOS shortcomings, your response is like an unfilled out form letter: Mechanically transmitted and without real pertinence.

    In theory, WebOS could have any of the features Android has. In reality, it's missing many of them. In theory, Android could use the Pre's elegant and clever task/app management system, but in reality it doesn't ... and that appears to not matter to the 160,000 folks each day who purchase an Android-based phone. Otherwise, it appears Android can pretty much do everything else a Pre can do - and a whole lot more. I guess feature priorities must matter at some level.
  9. #9  
    Both iOS and Android have millions of handsets out there in America yet I have yet to witness anyone speaking to their phone issuing it commands or doing searches. I think this speaks to the level that the technology is at right now (not to mention the absurdity/rudeness of screaming at your phone in public places).
    Sprint|Samsung Epic
  10.    #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by ryleyinstl View Post
    Maybe, maybe not....the only people who know right now are HP. If HP's VP Rahul Sood has anything to do with anything, we know he wants to see this on webOS.

    All that said I'm still not sure I see myself using voice search anywhere I wouldn't be using the speakerphone.....which is a lot of places.
    Guys, did you even read the link? Here... .

    It's not "voice search". It's voice actions that launch apps, input text into email, text, and notes, find websites, set alarms, navigate anywhere with the slimmest bit of info, create maps.....the possibilities are endless.

    You can't just throw voice functionality that deep onto an OS after the fact. Nobody else is doing this. No one. If HP made this same presentation and promised it for WebOS 2.0, people would be doing back flips in this forum. There's nothing wrong with recognizing the virtues of platforms and devices you don't own and don't want to. Doesn't diminish what you have.
  11.    #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by ryleyinstl View Post
    Both iOS and Android have millions of handsets out there in America yet I have yet to witness anyone speaking to their phone issuing it commands or doing searches. I think this speaks to the level that the technology is at right now (not to mention the absurdity/rudeness of screaming at your phone in public places).
    Keeping in mind this is rather limited anecdotal evidence, is it not possible that people who use this feature also think it's rude, and prefer to do it in private?

    Also, screaming and/or talking in a robotic, clipped monotone is not required to use this. Watch the Google video.
  12. #12  
    My wife has an EVO so I hang out on Android Central to get the latest and greatest info on Android for her.

    I hate to say, but universal search on webOS has been spanked (and spanked hard at that).

    webOS 2.0 needs to spank this in order to give us a leg up.

    Voice Actions for Android
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikah912 View Post
    .....it's hard to come up with a more efficient input method than talking.
    Swiping and moving cards for one. Given all the variables with voice recognition good old analog input is still going to be the standard for a while. The video is sexy and everything but in the real world, outside of a controlled video shoot, things tend to not work nearly as well.
    Sprint|Samsung Epic
  14. #14  
    <<Thread Merged and Renamed>>
    Sprint|Samsung Epic
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by ryleyinstl View Post
    Swiping and moving cards for one. Given all the variables with voice recognition good old analog input is still going to be the standard for a while. The video is sexy and everything but in the real world, outside of a controlled video shoot, things tend to not work nearly as well.
    Works good for me in and outside of my house. I mainly use it in my car, at home when I don't feel like texting or using my hands period, or to just show it off to people.
  16.    #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by ryleyinstl View Post
    Swiping and moving cards for one. Given all the variables with voice recognition good old analog input is still going to be the standard for a while. The video is sexy and everything but in the real world, outside of a controlled video shoot, things tend to not work nearly as well.
    Again, I also own a Hero on 2.1. Voice recognition is quite effective with the searches on that device. I can only imagine it's even better on a handset with more processing power, along with an updated voice app and OS.

    But swiping and moving cards being more efficient than "Hold down search button and dictate this text to Joe"? Really? One requires multiple keypresses, swipes, and locating the contact you want to send it to. The other is one keypress and some words. There's a navigation on WebOS more efficient than saying "Navigate to Ruth's Chris steakhouse"? There's a way to set an alarm quicker than being in any app and saying "Set an alarm for 8:30am"?

    Come on, guys.
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by foosball View Post
    Yeah except at some point webOS will have voice commands and Android will still be, well, Android.

    But the sooner the better cause voice command is a great feature.
    Under the current dynamics of both companies.

    I would put my money on Android becoming "less clunky"... before... I would put my money on webOS having Voice commands.

    Especially considering Palm is but a shell of it's former self with nearly all of the primary people responsible for webOS/Pre development now having moved on and Duarte now said to be leading development on the Gingerbread UI design team.
  18. #18  
    Outside of using it while driving, voice commands just seem more like a novelty feature.

    No one wants the whole world to hear what they're trying to do, and last we need is a world where everyone is speaking commands all day to operate their phone.

    Cool concept but much to geeky imo.
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by ryleyinstl View Post
    Swiping and moving cards for one. Given all the variables with voice recognition good old analog input is still going to be the standard for a while. The video is sexy and everything but in the real world, outside of a controlled video shoot, things tend to not work nearly as well.
    Real world application challenges extend beyond voice functions of course. With any of these functions (like the cards you mention), users can run into performance hiccups (like the dreaded TMC error). As always, YMMV.
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by ryleyinstl View Post
    Both iOS and Android have millions of handsets out there in America yet I have yet to witness anyone speaking to their phone issuing it commands or doing searches. I think this speaks to the level that the technology is at right now (not to mention the absurdity/rudeness of screaming at your phone in public places).
    Prior to google's voice actions, voice input was fairly limited. Sure you could voice dial on certain phones, sure you could do a voice search (similar to universal search on webOS), but this voice actions opens a whole new realm.

    Being able to say "send text john I will be late for our meeting" and then tapping the send button is a lot different than open the text messaging app, searching for john, tapping on his contact, tapping into the message window, tapping the microphone icon on your keyboard then finally saying the message.

    Sorry, but I feel this is somewhat revolutionary. I can see any developer being able to hook into this to incorporate voice actions into their app. I bet it will not be long and you will be able to say "facebook status oh my this new voice action thing is really cool!" on an android device.

    Granted, voice actions will NOT be for everyone, there will be some who choose not to use this functionality at all, but I think the way everyone here is saying "blah, don't want it, give me my keyboard any day" is completely disregarding the advance of technology.

    You also say "I have yet to witness anyone speaking to their phone issuing it commands or doing searches", do you really eavesdrop on that many conversations that people are having to ensure that they are not using voice commands? Someone might pick up their phone and say "call john", then wait for him to answer and begin speaking with him, how would you know they were voice dialing? It would just look like they were having a normal conversation on the phone.
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