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  1. birchasr's Avatar
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    #21  
    When Google Voice can transcribe more than 50% percent of a voice mail correctly I might believe this will be worthwhile. So, the only way this might be a good as it sounds is if Google's voice to text software has gotten dramatically better.
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by birchasr View Post
    When Google Voice can transcribe more than 50% percent of a voice mail correctly I might believe this will be worthwhile. So, the only way this might be a good as it sounds is if Google's voice to text software has gotten dramatically better.

    I tried it last month in the Sprint store and found it to be appalling.....perhaps it was my Canadian accent?
    Sprint|Samsung Epic
  3. stockh's Avatar
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    #23  
    I for one consider voice action the future of smartphones and envision the time where speaking commands account for 90% of the functions of smartphones.

    Keyboards will become secondary as a means for communicating with your handset.

    It is this reason alone I will be following android or WM7 for advancing this "game changer" technology.
  4.    #24  
    Mouth On With Android's Voice Actions (Verdict: It's Great)

    That's Gizmodo's hand...errr, mouth-on in a public setting with plenty of people talking in the background and with Jason holding it a good distance from his mouth, and it worked like a charm.
  5. #25  
    Ive always seen voice commands as a novelty feature. I had a friend who owned a clie (almost 7-8 years ago) and he could do a lot of voice commands. At first it was really fun to do, but it quickly became a headache since it almost never got the commands right. Soon it was just easier to navigate the menus to by hand to get everything done. I also had many of the same feature on my Moto Q (about 3 years ago) and had similar experience. Another friend of mine used to show off his voice search and text to speech capabilities on his iphone 3gs and this was a huge improvement over the clie and Moto Q but still had some glitches. He actually also got bored of the novelty and has not used it since.

    Also, I have and I am sure most of you all have tried the text to speech functionalities on a windows vista PC. Again it was fun at first but for some reason I always went back to regular typing.

    I guess what I am saying is that the voice command has been tried in various forms, though admittedly not as integrated as Android, but it never has grown into more than a novelty feature to show off to friends and then forget about.

    We will see if the improvements made by google will make this iteration more workable and maybe then get users to utilize more daily and through the life of the device.
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikah912 View Post
    Voice command with this level of integration isn't really on any OS except Android. HP is welcome to bolt-on voice command to WebOS whenever, but it will not function to this degree for the foreseeable future.
    Maybe you can explain why you think Android is better suited to have voice commands of this nature "bolted on" but webOS is not capable of handling this?

    This is a sincere question, so please don't flame me.
  7. #27  
    I used to use Voice Dialing on my WM device all the time and it worked very well.

    I don't use it nearly as much on Android because of the large touch screens and the multitude of dialing options. That... and IMO Android voice recognition is not quite as good as WM.
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by zulfaqar621 View Post
    Maybe you can explain why you think Android is better suited to have voice commands of this nature "bolted on" but webOS is not capable of handling this?

    This is a sincere question, so please don't flame me.
    I think what he was getting at... is because it is being integrated deeper into the OS and will be an API available for use by Applications. Android's universal search also takes search a step further with regards to what it can search and allows you to customize it.

    Attached, is an example of the menu options for Android's universal search.

    That's not to say that webOS could not do the same. I think he just feels that webOS may first just add the basics (Bolt-it-on) to add to the feature set and may eventually get to expanding it. I'm guessing, but his skepticism is likely stemming from Palm's past history with API's in this area.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by gmanvbva; 08/12/2010 at 03:00 PM. Reason: Fixed typo
  9. stockh's Avatar
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    #29  
    Quote Originally Posted by zulfaqar621 View Post
    Ive always seen voice commands as a novelty feature. I had a friend who owned a clie (almost 7-8 years ago) and he could do a lot of voice commands. At first it was really fun to do, but it quickly became a headache since it almost never got the commands right. Soon it was just easier to navigate the menus to by hand to get everything done. I also had many of the same feature on my Moto Q (about 3 years ago) and had similar experience. Another friend of mine used to show off his voice search and text to speech capabilities on his iphone 3gs and this was a huge improvement over the clie and Moto Q but still had some glitches. He actually also got bored of the novelty and has not used it since.

    Also, I have and I am sure most of you all have tried the text to speech functionalities on a windows vista PC. Again it was fun at first but for some reason I always went back to regular typing.

    I guess what I am saying is that the voice command has been tried in various forms, though admittedly not as integrated as Android, but it never has grown into more than a novelty feature to show off to friends and then forget about.

    We will see if the improvements made by google will make this iteration more workable and maybe then get users to utilize more daily and through the life of the device.
    Don't forget "smartphones" were a novelty at one point in time and look what has happened now. Once the technology advances enough where "it" can handle normal speed speech, and accuracy, clunky interfaces will radically change. (in my best stephen hawkings voice )
  10.    #30  
    Quote Originally Posted by zulfaqar621 View Post
    Maybe you can explain why you think Android is better suited to have voice commands of this nature "bolted on" but webOS is not capable of handling this?

    This is a sincere question, so please don't flame me.
    No flames necessary. Easy enough and rational question.

    Android's apps are deeply integrated with each other, and so is their voice functionality. Maps and Navigation are central to the Android experience, and they can integrate easily into third party apps as well. That makes it easy for Google to allow you to make maps and navigate routes by voice command, and for you to export that functionality to other apps like augmented reality browsers.

    WebOS depends on third party apps way more heavily, so there's no native maps or navigation to integrate with nor are there for third party apps to integrate well with. Well, HP is a big company, you might say. They'll just design their own, right?

    Way easier said than done. Microsoft has a considerable lead on HP and desktop success with Bing, and even they can't deliver as robust and feature-rich a version of Bing on WP7 as Google Maps and Navigation on Android. But at least they're starting with it in the SDK and it'll be in the OS from day one. It's harder to "bolt it on" after the fact after thousands of apps and an ecosystem have evolved without this deep integration.

    Beyond integration, it's not easy to create voice recognition technology as accurate as Android showed in the videos in this thread. Every mobile OS would love to have it, but it takes time and a lot of R&D. By the time HP could deliver a solution along the lines of what we see today, Google will likely have over a hundred voice actions spanning the OS and third party app ecosystem.
  11. #31  
    Quote Originally Posted by ryleyinstl View Post
    Maybe, maybe not....the only people who know right now are HP. If HP's VP Rahul Sood has anything to do with anything, we know he wants to see this on webOS.

    All that said I'm still not sure I see myself using voice search anywhere I wouldn't be using the speakerphone.....which is a lot of places.
    I couldn't agree more, on both points. It borders on foolishness for anyone outside of HP and/or Palm to say what they can do in "the forseeable future", since outsiders don't know what their future holds. For all we know, they've been developing the guts for something like this for months, and waiting for something to tie it to (though I doubt it sincerely).

    That said, I haven't been, am not, nor do I anticipate being, a fan of voice activated software. I've never seen it work to a degree that would suit me.
  12. solarus's Avatar
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    #32  
    Nice new cool ability - clearly most useful in a car. In public its not that great, given the "rudeness factor" but overall its pretty darn impressive. Still not moving to Android though.
  13. #33  
    Voice control on a phone could be extremely useful but so far has not been implemented with any real degree of accuracy. It will take sometime after people have tested out this feature in real world situations to see how well google has developed their version of voice control. For me the bar of success is that users are not frustrated with using the feature and they are still using it regularly at least one month after they first start using it. Secondly, even if it isn't the greatest new technology it will still get the masses to "ooh and ahh" over it and drive sales through the roof. So either way the handset makers and google win.

    I would love to be able to simply say a friends name and it correctly identify my contact and dial the number for me. Previous phones have failed miserably at this simplest of voice commands for me. I come from an international background and most of my friends are also. So, I have gotten about a 5% correct identification on first try. As others have pointed out Google doesn't really have a good reputation for speech to text transcription software.

    I also don't think Palm needs to implement voice command to the level of Android to remain in the game because I think most people just want to show off that they have the feature. Apple is a perfect example of providing paired down features of other smartphones and it hasn't hurt their sales.
    Last edited by zulfaqar621; 08/12/2010 at 06:19 PM.
  14. #34  
    I think Voice Commands are great and have their place, but they won't ever replace the traditional GUI. I personally will not talk to my phone is public and let everyone around me know what I am doing. I'm sure I am not alone.

    Sure car, home, different story, but I am out and about most of the time.
    Palm Vx -> Treo 600 -> Treo 700p -> Centro -> Pre (Launch Phone 06/06/09) -> AT&T Pre Plus with Sprint EVDO swap -> Samsung Epic 4G w/ Froyo
  15. #35  
    This thread has been cleaned up. Lets keep it on topic out of respect for the OP. Direct complaints to me and keep the thread clean.

    Thanks all.
    Sprint|Samsung Epic
  16. #36  
    +1, Have no interest in talking outloud in public. In the car a different story.

    Quote Originally Posted by NickDG View Post
    I think Voice Commands are great and have their place, but they won't ever replace the traditional GUI. I personally will not talk to my phone is public and let everyone around me know what I am doing. I'm sure I am not alone.

    Sure car, home, different story, but I am out and about most of the time.
  17. stockh's Avatar
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    #37  
    Before you discount speaking out commands to your smartphone in public, ask yourself do you talk on your phone in public?

    There should be no reason to be "barking" out commands. Speak into the handset as you would normally speak into the phone.

    Maybe you're still stuck in the 80's mode "barking" into a microphone like the phone was hard of hearing.
  18. #38  
    To Ryley and Peterlemonjello:

    I felt the same way you did about voice controls (beyond dialing) and "never getting it right."

    I use an iphone (and thus won't be able to use these impressive features....) but using Dragon Dictation (free app in the App Store) for simple voice-to-text translation has totally changed my opinion. I use it for text messaging the majority of the time over typing - I can't wait til its integrated INTO test messaging. I also use it for composing emails when I am in the car or using my mobile.

    Other than obscure names or jargon, I am blown away by how accurate it is. Sure, I need to speak clearly and slowly, and know their shortcuts for formatting, but you learn quickly how to best make it perform and after that, its indispensable. I don't even mind speaking short messages into it in public! (long ones, not so much....)

    Voice recognition has definitely changed.
  19.    #39  
    Quote Originally Posted by stockh View Post
    Before you discount speaking out commands to your smartphone in public, ask yourself do you talk on your phone in public?

    There should be no reason to be "barking" out commands. Speak into the handset as you would normally speak into the phone.

    Maybe you're still stuck in the 80's mode "barking" into a microphone like the phone was hard of hearing.
    Reminds me of that new Radio Shack commercial with Lance Armstrong:

    “Alphonse, why do people talk like this into their mobile phones?”
  20. #40  
    Quote Originally Posted by stockh View Post
    Don't forget "smartphones" were a novelty at one point in time and look what has happened now. Once the technology advances enough where "it" can handle normal speed speech, and accuracy, clunky interfaces will radically change. (in my best stephen hawkings voice )
    the video is very impressive -- its so seamless as to be organic.

    It enables uses and utility not readily possible in a small mobile device otherwise.

    Years ago I remember a pricey application that promised similar functionality -- it was promoted as a virtual secretary or butler. I don't recall want happened to it -- but presumably it was only usable under ideal circumstances, and only after you had trained it on your voice.

    If Android can work this well in noisy real world conditions, then this is pretty major.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
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