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  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    The march of tech moves on and on!

    Take care,

    Jay

    Amazon Says Kindle Sales Will Pass Paperbacks Within a Year

    Amazon Says Kindle Sales Will Pass Paperbacks Within a Year | Peter Kafka | MediaMemo | AllThingsD

    Amazon gives out almost no real data about its Kindle sales, and even less guidance. So mark down this rare prediction from CEO Jeff Bezos, via an interview with USA Today: I predict we will surpass paperback sales sometime in the next nine to 12 months. Sometime after that, well surpass the combination of paperback and hardcover. It stuns me.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    Digital is the best thing that happened to books. It I'll make it easier for authors without alot of cash to publish a book, because they won't need to print as many books, ship them worldwide, take up store shelfs, require a huge investments.


    Songs started getting pirated long before digital sales kicked in. And movies make the majority of their profits from the box office, and suffer from the same problem as songs. Books on the other hand weren't pirated much, since no one wanted it on their computer screen, so the digital space will help them out.
  3. #3  
    I'm not so sure about anything happening by the end of the year, but this seems like a natural outcome.

    For as long as there have been hardcover books, paperbacks, and libraries, there have been 3 basic types of book consumers.

    Hardcover: People who want a book to 'keep.' Books for building your own library, books to give your kids later, etc.

    Paperback: People who want something to read on the bus/toilet/at work/etc.

    Libraries: Cheap people, poor people, lazy people who live close to a library. (Don't go getting worked up about that one. I've gone to libraries for all 3 reasons at various points in my life)

    Sure, there's lot's of exceptions to that, but that covers the vast majority of pleasure readers. For the "paperback type," ebooks are ideal. Using an ebook reader or smartphone with the right app installed, allows you to carry many books wherever you go. Plus, the books are generally cheaper, which means that even though you have to buy a reader (unless you already have a smartphone) you will come out well ahead in the long-run if you go through a significant number of books.
    Quote Originally Posted by VeeDubb65 View Post
    It is as if you said that the result a dog and a cat mating was a giraffe. It's so completely wrong, that it's difficult to argue with someone who believes it to be true.
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by nimer55 View Post
    Books on the other hand weren't pirated much, since no one wanted it on their computer screen, so the digital space will help them out.

    Unfortunately, it will only help the ones who aren't idiots. There is at least one highly popular series of seven books, which I gladly purchased a full set of hard cover books as quickly as they came out, but the author refused to allow them to be published as ebooks.

    I would have gladly purchased the whole set again as ebooks, but since that's not an option, I'm left with a series of really lame choices.

    a. Live without.
    b. Re-type the whole series by hand.
    c. Buy a whole set of paperbacks and then spend countless hours running each page through my scanner and and OCR program.
    D. Engage in copyright piracy.
    Quote Originally Posted by VeeDubb65 View Post
    It is as if you said that the result a dog and a cat mating was a giraffe. It's so completely wrong, that it's difficult to argue with someone who believes it to be true.
  5. #5  
    While I don't usually get books from libraries, I wouldn't call the people who do "Cheap people, poor people, lazy people" . Maybe it's different in the states, but In canada Libraries are used by most people. I know students who read about 3 books a week, give a book an average of 7 cad, and thats $20 a week, $80 a month, over $1000 a year. Now if you can spend that much a year on books, then that's great for you, but it doesn't mean your poor, cheap, or lazy if you don't want to. I personally don't read books that often, and am so lazy that by the time i return the book, I pay the cost in late fees, so I buy one once in a while, or borrow from a friend.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by VeeDubb65 View Post
    D. Engage in copyright piracy.

    I Usually support purchasing the book, but am a firm believer that when you've paid for it once, you've gained the right to download a digital copy. I'm pretty sure that's legal in canada, but would do it even if it wasn't. When you buy a software, or even a book, you're not paying for the code, or the paper, you are paying for the right to enjoy the material/art. You've already purchased that right, so you're good to go.

    (the 7 books are the lord of the rings right? )
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by nimer55 View Post
    (the 7 books are the lord of the rings right? )
    No, although Christopher Tolkien has been just as resistant to allowing his father's works to be published as ebooks as J.K. Rowling has with the Harry Potter books I was referring to. Which seems odd since he let Peter Jackson make a series of movies out of it and let Rankin Bass turn it into a cartoon.

    I would say good guess, but it's pretty hard to make LotR come out to 7 books. It was written as one book broken up into 6 books when the publisher said it was too long, and then published as 3 because the publisher insisted on grouping them together. I guess you could count the 6 books (even though they were never published as 6 books) and then either count the book of appendacies as a book or add the hobbit to the list, but that's a stretch.


    ** Edit: I just realized you were joking. Oh well. So I've dimed myself out as slow on the uptake with humor, AND a huge book geek.
    Quote Originally Posted by VeeDubb65 View Post
    It is as if you said that the result a dog and a cat mating was a giraffe. It's so completely wrong, that it's difficult to argue with someone who believes it to be true.
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    #8  
    To swing this discussion over to webOS, the most ironic part of all this Kindle talk is that we, at webOS, have the most feature-filled ebook reader in pReader. I've tried the Kindle app on both the iPad and the iPhone4 and neither holds a candle to our very own pReader. Scrolling, fonts, customization, etc.... I have been an ebook fan for years and I am still shocked that the app on webOS is more feature rich than any other. In some ways we are spoiled.
  9. #9  
    Have a Kindle ( and Kindle on Android) and it is so great. I wish magazines that I read come out in digital form. The E book reader for the Pre is nice But the Pre is so small its not really a good Ereader. A ereader needs to be a decent size screen. the one on the iphone isnt even big enough ( but better then the Pre) . in order to get a page on them the text is so small.
  10. #10  
    Android has a pretty good one thats similar to the Iphone,Ipad app called Laputa in addition to the kindle and Nook app.
  11. Quintus's Avatar
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    #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by VaccPalm View Post
    The E book reader for the Pre is nice But the Pre is so small its not really a good Ereader. A ereader needs to be a decent size screen...
    Sorry, but I HAVE to disagree with you here. I am an avid reader and have been reading ebooks since 2002. Started with the Palm M130, then moved to the Palm M500, Palm T5, Palm T|X and presently use a Palm Pre, iPad and at times my wife's iPhone4. Of all of these gadgets, my favourite method of reading is using the Pre via pReader. The Kindle app for the iPad and the iPhone are good apps but my preference for reading remains the Pre.

    With pReader (and some useful software on the net to unDRM my kindle books), I always have the novel I am reading simultaneously loaded on all three devices (Pre, iPad and iPhone) at any given time. As such, I always have the choice of any of these three for reading.

    Everyone has their own preferences and there is no "correct" answer to this debate. I just wanted to chime in as someone who loves reading, loves ebooks and has had experience with many different types of ereaders.

    I have yet to try a Kindle or Sony eReader which use eInk but given my preference for the Pre form factor, I doubt that these gadgets would sway me away from the Pre as my primary ereader.

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