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  1. #41  
    Hopefully the fixed the uselessness of the sim card when it comes to applications. At least in my old blackberry, all apps had to be on internal memory, the SIM was just for media. I constantly had to reboot the phone due to it freezing up when running out of memory.
  2. #42  
    You mean the memory card, right?
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  3. #43  
    This phone looks like a screwed up Pre and they decided to give it Blackberry OS. Blackberry is going no where and RIM tries this outdated look? All they could do was a little slider? And this is better then the Storm2 how? RIP RIM.
    Last edited by SmoothCriminal; 08/04/2010 at 06:41 PM.
  4. Speebs's Avatar
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    #44  
    Quote Originally Posted by SmoothCriminal View Post
    This phone looks like a screwed up Pre and they decided to give it Blackberry OS. Blackberry is going no where and RIM tries this outdated look? All they could do was a little slider? And this is better then the Storm2 how? RIP RIM.
    I think it's funny that people can love the pre so much and then rip on this for being too similar to a pre. I'm not a huge fan of Blackberry, but they definitely do e-mail well and that is why people use them (aside from BB messenger). This will be the go-to device for everyone who used to own a BB Pearl, including my girlfriend, to whom I can't in good conscience recommend a Pre because of the build quality.
  5. BDoG76's Avatar
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    #45  
    is anyone considering going with the blackberry torch? I mean, the hardware HAS to be superior to the palm pre, right? It looks just like a palm pre to me. Touchscreen and vertical slideout keyboard.

    I'm on pre #7. This one has lasted the longest, probably because after going through refurb aftet refurb, I complained and they just gave me a new one. Well... My speaker is blown on this one. So... Gotta go back for #8. In just over a year... 7 replacements is absolutley ridiculous.
  6. #46  
  7. #47  
    8 replacements!? Ever think it's you and not the pre? I'm still on my first one. Btw unless you are on att or plan on switching good luck gettin the new bb torch... I read a article somewhwere saying bb and att are teaming up for the release of the Torch.
  8. #48  
    have you seen any video of it? Yeah, the hardware is nice but the OS is laggy and sucks. I would love it, if someone could some how port WebOS over to the torch :-) then with Palms software and RIMs harware. It could just be the best phone ever made.

    just my 2 cents...
  9. #49  
    What are you people doing to your phones that require that many replacements? Holy crap after 4 I would have jumped ship or got a Pixi or something.

    You know what's more ridiculous than 7 replacements? Getting something replaced 7 times.
    Palm Vx -> Treo 600 -> Treo 700p -> Centro -> Pre (Launch Phone 06/06/09) -> AT&T Pre Plus with Sprint EVDO swap -> Samsung Epic 4G w/ Froyo
  10. #50  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Juan Juice View Post
    have you seen any video of it? Yeah, the hardware is nice but the OS is laggy and sucks. I would love it, if someone could some how port WebOS over to the torch :-) then with Palms software and RIMs harware. It could just be the best phone ever made.

    just my 2 cents...
    The torch's internals are garbage for a phone at this date and time
  11. #51  
    Quote Originally Posted by 063_xobx View Post
    The torch's internals are garbage for a phone at this date and time
    Seriously I was wondering what they were thinking throwing a 600mhz CPU in a flagship device in 2010.

    That's also the reason they probably didn't include Flash 10 on there. Adobe sent them the final code a month ago.
    Palm Vx -> Treo 600 -> Treo 700p -> Centro -> Pre (Launch Phone 06/06/09) -> AT&T Pre Plus with Sprint EVDO swap -> Samsung Epic 4G w/ Froyo
  12. #52  
    Hi all,

    It the BB Torch has arrived to very mixed views. From what I gather, this one had to hit out of the ball park...but has it???

    The fact that the reviews are mixed is trouble for RIM!

    Take care,

    Jay

    RIMís Continued Apple Envy Snuffs the Blackberry Torch
    Share113:10 am, August 4th, 2010, Pete Mortensen

    RIM’s Continued Apple Envy Snuffs the Blackberry Torch | Cult of Mac

    The Blackberry Torch misses the mark. We all know this. From its *******ized Palm Pre meets Chinese black market phone industrial design to its Android-by-way-of-Vectrex UI, the entire product is just a complete whiff as an attempt to release a modern, relevant phone for the multitouch and App Store era. Not only that, this is RIMís third straight swing and miss for an iPhone-killer. We all know this.

    But why canít RIM manage to put forth a phone at least on a par with the Droid or the Samsung Galaxy S line? The answerís simple, really. Theyíre so jealous of Appleís success that they canít bring themselves to find their way forward.

    As I noted almost two years ago the first time RIM disastrously stumbled into the touchscreen market, the companyís fundamental problem is that they refuse to regard the creation of phones to compete with Apple as anything more than new product development. Rather than conceive a great experience from the ground up and then building a device, software, and a support ecosystem thatís optimized to that experience, as Apple has, RIM keeps trying to launch a great touch experience by evolving the existing BlackBerry OS and key brand elements. And thatís just not going to work.

    The iPhone was conceived from the ground up as a new platform. All it shared with the iPod was the ability to work with iTunes, file compatibility for music and video, and the Apple logo on the back. Everything else was designed with making a new category of phone based around multitouch interaction. And there were many features envisioned for that platform that were only rolled out later, such as the App Store, 3G, GPS, and now, 3rd party multitasking. They started out by trying to do something wildly different from anything else on the market.

    Contrast that to RIM, still the North American sales leader in smartphones and No. 2 worldwide behind equally flailing Nokia. Like Nokia (and Microsoftís Zune, for that matter), RIM canít believe that the iPhone is successful. Theyíre certain that their approach to phones is superior, but in their contempt for consumers they have no feel for, they pack in perfunctory versions of the signature software that made the iPhone great, like a Webkit browser, a touchscreen, and a greater focus on apps.

    So they simply bolt all of it to an existing platform thatís built around e-mail, contact management, and calendaring. As has been the case in previous generations, the Torch once again feels like a phone that RIMís brass wonít be using but that they assume the young people with their weird tastes will be into. The fact that the hardware is anemic and glitchy just underscores this point.

    To quote Gandhi in as crass a manner as possible, ďFirst they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.Ē Weíre at the tail end of the ďthen they fight youĒ era in this conflict. No oneís way forward is to simply copy the iPhone. Android has a very distinct personality, as does Web OS, and even Windows Phone 7.

    If RIM wants to remain a force in smartphones for reasons other than good relationships with IT managers and superior security, they need to figure out what the next generation of business phones really looks like. The iPhone is a brilliant consumer phone that has been expanded to include serious business applications. No one has yet managed to produce a brilliant business phone for the current era that also has room for home life in it. RIM could be that company, but itís running out of years to get there.This is the exact trap Apple fell into in the mid-í90s before the NeXT acquisition, churning out OS after OS that added bells and whistles but didnít address the core needs of the market. What a shame that RIM didnít manage to acquire WebOS, port the BlackBerry Enterprise Mail platform to it and unveil a credible iPhone alternative.

    Hereís one thing Iím sure of: RIMís future doesnít involve anything called Blackberry OS 7. Can I suggest, as Apple did, moving ahead to OS X?

    Posted by Pete Mortensen
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  13. #53  
    Quote Originally Posted by NickDG View Post
    Seriously I was wondering what they were thinking throwing a 600mhz CPU in a flagship device in 2010.
    The 9800 is essentially a 9700 with a physically larger screen (with touch), more RAM and BB OS 6 on it. The 9700 was launched at the end of last year.

    The OS is probably faster than Android or WebOS on 600MHz hardware and has much better battery life than 1GHZ phones or the Pre. RIM designs their phones to work well as phones which means they focus on things like battery life and RF performance.
  14. #54  
    Quote Originally Posted by ADGrant View Post
    The 9800 is essentially a 9700 with a physically larger screen (with touch), more RAM and BB OS 6 on it. The 9700 was launched at the end of last year.

    The OS is probably faster than Android or WebOS on 600MHz hardware and has much better battery life than 1GHZ phones or the Pre. RIM designs their phones to work well as phones which means they focus on things like battery life and RF performance.
    I wounder if you would stand by that statement. Have you seen the video of the oS in action...bottom line is its very laggy and choppy (even engaget states it cant compete with the android, webos, or iphones out there). The webkit browser is very choppy pinch to zoom is very bad too. The OS is a mix of the basic iphone os type icons displayed on the home page, mixed with the drawer type tabs you see in android. This phone is by no means faster or can out perform any of the current phones on the market. Im sorry but I dont agree at all, to me RIM is trying to play in a game where their pants size is not available.

    like Nokia bye bye RIM.
  15. #55  
    Quote Originally Posted by wellwellwell11 View Post
    I wounder if you would stand by that statement. Have you seen the video of the oS in action...bottom line is its very laggy and choppy (even engaget states it cant compete with the android, webos, or iphones out there). The webkit browser is very choppy pinch to zoom is very bad too. The OS is a mix of the basic iphone os type icons displayed on the home page, mixed with the drawer type tabs you see in android. This phone is by no means faster or can out perform any of the current phones on the market. Im sorry but I dont agree at all, to me RIM is trying to play in a game where their pants size is not available.

    like Nokia bye bye RIM.
    The Pre is no speed daemon and is a battery hog to boot. Many of the 1GHZ Android phones also have terrible battery life. It is true that the Torch does not really compare too well against the iPhone 4 but most Android phones don't and the Pre certainly doesn't.

    The Torch does have a few advantages over the iPhone though. The physical keyboard and phone buttons, BB Messenger, Enterprise support and security in general. BB users can get by with the $15 data plan too. Unlike the Pre it has true universal search.

    Both Nokia and RIM are in a much stronger market position than HPalm and are likely to be more successful in the future.
  16. #56  
    To those who keep saying bye RIM, wait until corporations do so first. I think even our government may use BB on a regular basis since the President has one. RIM ain't going anywhere until corporations and government abandon it.

    Consumers who don't rely on BB may be another story though. But non-corporate BBs are still popular around here, likely for the texting.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  17. #57  
    Quote Originally Posted by ADGrant View Post
    The Pre is no speed daemon and is a battery hog to boot. Many of the 1GHZ Android phones also have terrible battery life. It is true that the Torch does not really compare too well against the iPhone 4 but most Android phones don't and the Pre certainly doesn't.

    The Torch does have a few advantages over the iPhone though. The physical keyboard and phone buttons, BB Messenger, Enterprise support and security in general. BB users can get by with the $15 data plan too. Unlike the Pre it has true universal search.

    Both Nokia and RIM are in a much stronger market position than HPalm and are likely to be more successful in the future.
    I just wish they'd jazzed it up more so people could shut up. Higher resolution screen, a better processor and different design tweak would have done it. But I guess they did that design to appeal to corporate users who don't want flashy. I think the OS itself is pretty good considering BB is mainly business. They've integrated better media capability and the wifi sync option is pretty good feature IMO.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  18. #58  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post

    Consumers who don't rely on BB may be another story though. But non-corporate BBs are still popular around here, likely for the texting.
    True, but as of now, RIM's consumer market share is about the same as Android's and far greater than Apple's.
  19. #59  
    Also keep in mind that while this phone may not be a hit with consumers, they have many phones on multiple networks.

    Unlike palm who currently has two phones, both of which are struggling to gain traction in the smart-phone marketplace.

    Sprint Pre- Meta-Doctor 2.1.0 w/Flash

    Everything is Amazing & Nobody is Happy, "People with their mobile phones, "uh... oh... it won't..."... GIVE IT A SECOND... IT'S GOING TO SPACE!" Louis C.K.
  20. #60  
    Well, as a long time BB user and current Tour carrier (business), I would certainly give this a fair shot. I have NEVER played a game on a phone, for instance. I am very happy with my Pre. I honestly do not need it to be much faster, etc. I would like better build quality.

    That is where BB shines. Add Universal Search and some of the other things plus a decent browser and it meets almost all of my needs.

    There are a lot of us out there that do not need all the bells and whistles. I think it APPEARS to fit a slot very well. I wish it were on Sprint. I surely exchange my Tour for it (at least, to try).

    My Pre is fun. I enjoy its simplicity and all. So, I am not saying I would go from my Pre to it. But, I would upgrade the BB.
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