Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    Kindle prices drop like a rock!

    LOL is the plural of Kindle = kindles or Kindli?? sorry it's been a long day!

    Take care,

    Jay


    Amazon unveils new generation of Kindles
    by David Carnoy, July 28, 2010 5:04 PM PDT

    Amazon unveils new generation of Kindles | Crave - CNET

    Yes, the rumors are true.

    Amazon on Wednesday officially unveiled a next-generation Kindle that is what many tech pundits thought it would be: smaller and lighter, with a better screen and some Wi-Fi thrown into the mix.

    The new e-reader comes in a couple of flavors, one with both Wi-Fi and 3G wireless for $189, and a Wi-Fi-only version that costs $139, some $10 less than Barnes & Noble's Nook Wi-Fi. The new Kindles are available in graphite or white and ship on August 27, with Amazon taking pre-orders for both e-readers now.

    On top of the more compact design, some other key additions include more memory--4GB instead of 2GB--and double the battery life (4 weeks instead of 2 weeks with the wireless turned off).

    Here's a look at the highlights:

    6-inch E-Ink display
    WiFi and 3G ($189), WiFi only ($139)
    21 percent smaller than previous Kindle
    15 percent lighter (8.7 ounces)
    Like the new Kindle DX, screen offers 50 percent better contrast
    20 percent faster page turns, according to Amazon
    4GB built-in memory
    Smaller page-turn buttons that are quieter (clicking noise is nearly silent)
    Up to four weeks of battery life from sealed-in battery (wireless turned off)
    New "experimental" WebKit-based browser (experimental). Amazon says the updated web browser is "faster, easier to navigate, and provides a new 'article mode' feature that simplifies web pages to just the main text-based content for easier reading."
    Expanded text-speech options. New text-to-speech enabled menus allow you to navigate the Kindle without having to read menu options. You can not only listen to books aloud (certain ones, anyway) but content listings on the home screen, item descriptions, and all menu options.
    Amazon says the new Kindle uses an improved built-in PDF reader, with new dictionary lookup, notes and highlights, and support for password protected PDFs.
    No cover included but Amazon will sell two new covers, one of which has a built-in flip-out light for $59.99.
    Recently, the Kindle was listed as "out of stock" on Amazon, fueling speculation that a new Kindle was on the way. Based on a report by Bloomberg, rumor had it that Amazon's next-generation Kindle would lack color and a touch screen, and that it would arrive in August. For those who ordered an older model within the past 30 days, Amazon says you'll be able to return that Kindle and get a new model when it ships. (For those who ordered a Kindle just outside that 30-day window, you can call Amazon customer support and see what they say).

    We got a chance to play around with the new Kindle for a short time and while Amazon wouldn't immediately let us photograph it side by side with the old Kindle, the new model is clearly smaller and sleeker and the screen definitely pops a little more, much like the new Kindle DX's screen does. The letters appear a little darker and Amazon has tweaked the font options, so they also appear slightly sharper.

    Amazon has apparently spent well over a year designing the new model and the resulting product is more evolutionary than revolutionary. But the changes--particularly the size and the addition of Wi-Fi--should tempt current Kindle owners to upgrade and attract a new batch of e-reader buyers who've been sitting on the fence, waiting for the new Kindle to arrive. While not the $99 device some were hoping for, at $139 the Wi-Fi-only version is pretty affordable.

    We should get our hands on a review unit fairly soon and will put it through its paces and compare it to the previous Kindle. We'll also want to take a closer look at the Web browser using both 3G and Wi-Fi. In our short look, it works significantly better than the current web browser (particularly on Wi-Fi), though it obviously doesn't support Flash or video.

    As always, feel free to comment and let us know what you think about the new Kindle models.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    140 is cheap enough for a random impulsive buy... maybe.
  3. Balzak's Avatar
    Posts
    79 Posts
    Global Posts
    131 Global Posts
    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by Garage91 View Post
    140 is cheap enough for a random impulsive buy... maybe.
    I was thinking the same thing
  4.    #4  
    Hi all,

    I am sure they will drop in price even more in the next few months!

    take care, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  5. #5  
    Have the regular 3g Kindle and I have to say the Kindle is sweet if your a book reader.
  6. bruba's Avatar
    Posts
    743 Posts
    Global Posts
    752 Global Posts
    #6  
    I wonder when we'll see the first color e-ink ereaders..

    As soon as the b/w ones become cheaper than $100, ebooks will probably blow up..
  7. #7  
    Got rid of my kindle for the iPad, but if they can get this thing to $99, it will sell like crazy.
  8.    #8  
    Hi all,

    Moore's law at work!

    Take care, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  9.    #9  
    Hi all,

    Here is a review from PC Mag...It sounds great. Will not work for me, b/c of my disability it is painful and difficult to look down at or hold a book. I must admit, this is much lighter than a hard cover book. However, I listen to books vis the National Library Service of the Library of Congress for free!

    Take care,

    Jay

    Hands On with the New Amazon Kindle
    ARTICLE DATE: 07.29.10

    Hands On with the New Amazon Kindle

    By Dan Costa
    The Amazon Kindle launched the e-book market as we know it this week with the Tuesday introduction of a $139 Wi-Fi version of the device. The release shows how the company plans to continue to lead in the segment: focus on reading.

    I got some hands-on time with the newest Kindle, which ships August 27, and found a device that was very similar to previous versions, but better in several important ways.

    The first thing you notice about the new Kindle is the size. The device is 21 percent smaller than the previous version, making it much easier to slip into a coat pocket. You might think the screen is smaller, but it is the same six-inch screen as the older version. It is only the border that is smaller.

    The new device feels solid in the hand and the smaller size makes it easier to manage one-handed. At 8.7 ounces it is 15 percent lighter than the previous model, and although it isn't any thinner, it is still about one-third of an inch. That is probably a good thing since the thickness is needed to protect that screen.

    And the screen deserves some protection. The number one complaint with E Ink displays is that they are too grey. It is a function of the technology; all e-book readers have grey screens. Still, the new Kindle has managed to make a screen that is significantly less grey. In fact, the company claims it has upped the contrast by 50 percent. Indeed, putting it side-by-side next to an older Kindle makes the extra contrast immediately apparent. Don't compare it to a bright iPad, but it looks like the brightest E Ink display I have ever seen.

    The Kindle I played with was running version 3.0 of the Kindle software, although it was hard to say what the benefit of this was. I expect that the improved font handling and faster page turns come into play here. The company developed two new, proprietary text handling technologies. Waveform controls how the final grey level is set for images and text. Font hinting is designed to optimize font display when pixels are limited, as is the case with E Ink displays. I need more time to see just how effective these technologies are, but the page turns do seems faster. The software update leads me to wonder if current Kindle owners will get these same benefits when they upgrade.

    I spent a little time trying out the Wi-Fi features, and found logging into a network pretty straightforward. Downloading books is quicker and browsing on the still-experimental, but slightly updated Web browser is, obviously, faster when you're on Wi-Fi. Times like these are when that Kindle physical keyboard comes in pretty handy, it makes typing in WEP keys a lot easier. Wi-Fi has been one of the key advantages to the updated Barnes & Noble Nook. Although the Kindle will still sell for $189, the 3G-less, Wi-Fi-only Kindle will be priced at $139.

    Speaking of the keyboard, it has pretty much the same layout, but I found the keys to be slightly more raised. In previous versions, the keys are almost recessed, so this is a big improvement.

    The Kindle now comes in a grey, graphite color, although the traditional white will still be available. It ships August 27. We expect a Kindle in PC Labs soon for testing, so stay tuned for our full review.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  10.    #10  
    Hi all,

    Sony may not be ready to play nice with others!

    Take care,

    jay


    E-Reader Price War Could Slow-Sony Hints It Won't Play That Game
    By ADRIANNE JEFFRIES of ReadWriteWeb, July 29, 2010

    E-Reader Price War Could Slow-Sony Hints It Won't Play That Game - NYTimes.com

    We posted yesterday about the price war that's currently raging between Barnes & Noble, Amazon and Sony, makers of some of the top-selling e-readers in the U.S.

    Today a public relations representative sent us a statement on behalf of Sony that suggests the company may be pulling out of the race to the bottom.

    "Pricing is one consideration in the dedicated reading device marketplace, but Sony won't sacrifice the quality and design we're bringing book lovers to lay claim to the cheapest eReader," said Phil Lubell, VP of digital reading at Sony Electronics. "Our global customers expect to get the best digital book reading experience and we're concentrated on delivering that by investing in Sony's award-winning design and original digital reading enhancements, such as eBook library borrowing and the only full touch screen on the market."

    Image from Sony's e-book website

    Amazon announced the Kindle Wi-Fi, which has a 6" display, will retail for $139 in August, making it the cheapest e-reader yet. The Wall Street Journal reported this morning that a lesser-known manufacturer is coming out with a 5" screen e-reader for $99 later this year. Sony's least-expensive e-reader, the 5" screen Sony Reader Pocket Edition, was $149.99 at the time of this post.

    So does this mean Sony won't lower the price of the Sony Reader anytime soon? It would seem so, but the company isn't ready to box itself in.

    "Nothing to announce at this time regarding a price move," said Leanne Drown of Racepoint Group, which represents Sony. "The quote reflects broader thinking around strategy moving forward."

    Copyright 2010 ReadWriteWeb. All Rights Reserved.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  11.    #11  
    Hi all,

    It is one of those nights where my Fibromyalgia is keeping me up, so here is another article, but this one on the nook! take care,

    Jay


    Barnes & Noble Planning Big Push to Increase Nook Sales
    By JULIE BOSMAN, July 29, 2010

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/30/bu...gewanted=print

    BARNES & NOBLE customers are about to see a lot more of the Nook.

    In September, the chain will begin an aggressive promotion of its Nook e-readers by building 1,000-square-foot boutiques in all of its stores, with sample Nooks, demonstration tables, video screens and employees who will give customers advice and operating instructions.

    By devoting more floor space to promoting the Nook, Barnes & Noble is playing up what it calls a crucial advantage over Amazon in the e-reader war: its 720 bricks-and-mortar stores, where customers can test out the device before they commit to buying it.

    ē

    ďI think thatís everything,Ē William Lynch, chief executive of Barnes & Noble, said in an interview. ďAmerican consumers want to try and hold gadgets before they purchase them.Ē

    Amazonís Kindle e-reader is for sale on Amazon.com and in Target and HMSHost stores.

    Barnes & Noble has already installed small counters in its stores where customers can test out the Nook. The new display space would be much larger, and it would be located next to each storeís cafe, to encourage customers to stop by the Nook space, coffee or tea in hand. It would also sell more than 100 accessories for the Nook, like padded covers designed by Kate Spade and Jonathan Adler.

    While in the store, Barnes & Noble customers can read entire e-books free, just as they can with print books. ďWeíve tried to replicate the physical bookstore experience,Ē Mr. Lynch said.

    To make room for the new Nook displays, Barnes & Noble plans to clear out some of its music merchandise, which in its superstores takes up 3,600 square feet, and to arrange its books more efficiently. Mr. Lynch said that the number of books on display in Barnes & Noble stores would not decrease.

    All summer, Amazon and Barnes & Noble have been locked in a fierce battle over their competing e-reader devices. In June, Barnes & Noble lowered the price of the Nook to $199 from $259, and Amazon quickly cut the price of its Kindle to $189 from $259. On Wednesday, Amazon announced plans to introduce two new versions of its Kindle e-reader, one for $139, the lowest price yet for a Kindle. Barnes & Noble also sells a version of the Nook, without free 3G and Wi-Fi, for $149.

    According to the Codex Group, a consultant to the publishing industry, nearly two million Kindles had been sold as of mid-June and more than 600,000 Nooks. The Nook has been on sale since October 2009 and the Kindle since December 2007. Of course, both Nook and Kindle are looking over their shoulder at iPad, the newest e-reader on the block.

    ē

    Analysts said the 2010 holiday season might be the first time that most consumers become aware enough of e-readers to seriously consider buying one, given their greater visibility and lower price.

    ďMost people have never read an e-book,Ē said Michael Norris, senior analyst at Simba Information, which provides research and advice to publishers. ďMost people still donít know much about these devices.Ē
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  12.    #12  
    Hi all, FYI!

    Take care,

    Jay

    Kindle vs. iPad: Youíre Both Winners
    By ADAM JACKSON of GigaOm, July 29, 2010
    Amazon has announced a new Kindle that most bloggers are calling Kindle 3. The new device seems pretty awesome, both in features and price. Itís important that we declare both devices as winners in their own right and set some things straight for anyone calling iPad a Kindle killer or the other way around.

    Kindle as a service

    Kindle is a service that allows consumers to buy books from anywhere in the world as long as there is an Internet connection. Books can be purchased via any device with a modern web browser and you can read those books on any device that supports Kindle software like your Mac, PC, iPhone, iPad, Android and Amazonís own Kindle hardware.

    Amazonís strategy is different from Appleís. Apple developed the iTunes Store as a service to drive the sales of its hardware. Kindle software and hardware was created to drive the sale of books and other downloadable content. Kindle is huge for Amazon because going digital isnít just convenient to the consumer. Itís great for Amazon because it doesnít have to keep a stock of books and worry about paying to ship those books and the consumer wins by having that book accessible across multiple devices instantly. All Amazon has to do is ensure its selection of books is higher and its price is lower than the competition.

    Kindle and iPad finally coexisting

    Until todayís announcement, Kindle as a device was scrutinized against the Apple iPad, because while you could read books on both, the iPad was only $150 more than the smaller Kindle and a few bucks more than the larger Kindle DX.

    Amazon aggressively slashed prices on the device in a way that made everyone think they were just being defensive and fearful of iPad but today, that all changed.

    Kindle 3 is priced at $139 (Wi-Fi only) and an International version with 3G is only $189 (3G via GSM). TechCrunch Reports:



    In addition to the price and screen change, the redesigned body is 21% smaller and 15% lighter, down to about 8.5oz. If their press release is to be believed, itís also got twice the storage (4GB) and significantly improved battery life over the old Kindle.



    Kindle is priced so aggressively that true book lovers can buy the new Kindle at a price thatís simply a no brainer considering that Kindle books cost considerably less than real books and youíre saving on shipping and the pesky 3-7 days it takes for a book to arrive at your door. No longer is there a decision to make between buying a Kindle device or simply paying $150 more and having an iPad that does books and so much more.

    Amazon is finally showing the industry that it doesnít want to make millions selling Kindles. Itís about the sale of digital books.

    Apple and Amazon are both winners

    When youíre just talking hardware, Apple will continue to sell millions of iPads to people who want books, games, movies, apps and the web and the Kindle will continue to sell in the millions for book lovers. This is a huge win for consumers because our decision is made for us and bloggers can stop comparing both devices like theyíre the same. Iíll be buying a Kindle for my sister who reads books every day and an Amazon gift card so she can buy a few books to get started. Itís a much easier gift than paying $499 for an iPad that sheíll mostly be using for books, anyway.

    So who are the losers?

    Basically, everyone thatís not Apple or Amazon. For now and the foreseeable future, Amazon has done a phenomenal job getting Kindle on millions of computers, phones and other handheld devices. Its goal of selling books by the truck load is working well as it just announced Kindle books are now outselling physical books after only three years. The losers are Barnes & Nobleís Nook, Sonyís E-Reader, and any other devices that donít either work with Amazon or have their own book store. B&N has a fighting chance but Amazonís user base of passionate book buyers will stay true to Amazon and Apple has over 100 million accounts with credit cards who will dive right in to iBooks. Sorry, but itís clear who the winners are in the digital book sales space.

    What about iBooks?

    Amazon and Apple may not be competing when it comes to Kindle hardware versus iPad but theyíre still competing in the book sales space. Iíve been meaning to write this for a while but I wonít buy a book via iBooks outside of the free section. The reason is that Apple hasnít convinced me that my digital DRMed books are safe with them. In the same way that my iTunes movies and music (prior to iTunes Plus) are not playable on other hardware other than Appleís. Amazon has displayed the right strategy that any device or platform that comes out in the future will eventually get Kindle software and those digital books I bought in 2007 will sync to that device without fail and Amazon is a large company that I trust. iBooks may win me over eventually but for price, selection and compatibility, Kindle (the service) has me hooked.

    Kindle versus iPad is a dead argument. Youíre both winners. No one is arguing the iPad isnít better hardware for much more than books but that comes at a price and, even on the iPad, Kindle is just one tap away via its own app.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  13. #13  
    Jay once agaiin thanks for all the great info. Sorry your having issues and hope your having a better day today and keep up the good work , we all appreciate it.
  14.    #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by VaccPalm View Post
    Jay once agaiin thanks for all the great info. Sorry your having issues and hope your having a better day today and keep up the good work , we all appreciate it.
    Thank you! Take care, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  15. #15  
    So the question is when is the Kindle app coming out for WebOS???
  16.    #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by andyd93 View Post
    So the question is when is the Kindle app coming out for WebOS???
    Hi,

    That is a very good question!!!!!!!!!!!

    Take care,

    jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group

Posting Permissions