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  1.    #1  
    Interesting article in todays NY Times about RIM's future, and notice that Palm isn't even part of the smartphone discussion.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/26/bu...iews.html?_r=1
  2. #2  
    Obama wasn't in it too, how odd....
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by balla2g2 View Post
    Obama wasn't in it too, how odd....
    hes prolly already blamed bush for the lack of support lately
  4. #4  
    Palms not in anybodys discussion. They are almost in the same boat as 2 years ago. Meanwhile android and apple are selling more than ever... Rim doesn't have to fear.. no one has to fear palm...



    ...Yet.
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by trener1 View Post
    Interesting article in todays NY Times about RIM's future, and notice that Palm isn't even part of the smartphone discussion.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/26/bu...iews.html?_r=1

    Nor was M$.

    Once market forces choose winners, its very hard for insurgent competitors to get traction.

    Both Google and Apple have good hardware, very good user friendly OSes, and environments that App developers have flocked to.

    The more users they have, the more App developers want to create Apps for their environments. The more users they get, the more those users persuade their friends that they too should get the same system. The more Apps they have, the more businesses want to adopt them for their corporate users.

    These kinds of battles often end with one winner: VHS/Betamax; BlueRay/HDDVD.

    Sometimes two.

    Though Windows/Macintosh had one winner, Apple survived and prospered within its specialized niche. OS/2, (NEXT), BEOS. Amiga, Atari, TRS-80 (??) disappeared.

    Its hard to see how HP/Palm, M$, Nokia, or RIM can offer anything so incomprehensibly great as to reverse the trends toward an Apple/Google duopoly.
    Last edited by BARYE; 07/26/2010 at 09:14 PM.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post
    Nor was M$.

    Once market forces choose winners, its very hard for insurgent competitors to get traction.

    Both Google and Apple have good hardware, very good user friendly OSes, and environments that App developers have flocked to.

    The more users they have, the more App developers want to create Apps for their environments. The more users they get, the more those users persuade their friends that they too should get the same system. The more Apps they have, the more businesses want to adopt them for their corporate users.

    These kinds of battles often end with one winner: VHS/Betamax; BlueRay/HDDVD.

    Sometimes two.

    Though Windows/Macintosh had one winner, Apple survived and prospered within its specialized niche. OS/2, (NEXT), BEOS. Amiga, Atari, TRS-80 (??) disappeared.

    Its hard to see how HP/Palm, M$, Nokia, or RIM can offer anything so incomprehensibly great as to reverse the trends toward an Apple/Google duopoly.
    While I understand where you're coming from with this, I don't think its fair comparing format wars to the smartphone industry. They are so completely different. Smartphones, and cellphones in general, are people most personal gadgets. They are also the pinnacle consumer innovation at the moment. Furthermore, a standardized format has historically never been the winner forever. Even though vhs beat out betamax, it wasn't king at the top forever, as dvd came in and took over. Consumers benefit from the lack of options with proprietary formats, because we don't need to worry about having to get multiple media players to watch all the movies and such that come out. In contrast, we benefit from more competition in the smartphone industry because it gives us more options and drives innovation. Smartphones are such complex gadgets today that I don't think comparing the smartphone industry to format wars is a fair comparison.

    Even though there will always be market leaders, history has already shown that the smartphone industry won't mirror that of the desktop, where MS basically has a monopoly. I think this is mostly due to the fact that owning a cellphone these days is nearly a necessity, and smartphones in general have a lower up front cost due to carrier subsidization. Peoples preferences change, and there will always be a good amount of people looking to buy something different than what everyone else has.
  7. #7  
    HP, RIM, Microsoft, and Nokia/Intel have highly competitive devices in the works. This should be fun!

    6 OS's this'll be a war to watch.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by IcerC View Post
    HP, RIM, Microsoft, and Nokia/Intel have highly competitive devices in the works. This should be fun!

    6 OS's this'll be a war to watch.
    I can see wp7 taking off pretty well in the US. Meego on the other hand, makes android look like ios. I have a though time believing it will do well in the US. I guess it has a chance in europe and asia though, Nokia never really figured out how to please American consumers.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by voodoochild View Post

    ...Even though there will always be market leaders, history has already shown that the smartphone industry won't mirror that of the desktop, where MS basically has a monopoly. I think this is mostly due to the fact that owning a cellphone these days is nearly a necessity, and smartphones in general have a lower up front cost due to carrier subsidization. Peoples preferences change, and there will always be a good amount of people looking to buy something different than what everyone else has.
    I agree that M$ has missed out in mobile -- they are like Sony was in music, video, TVs -- a lazy entrenched incumbent, caught asleep by their more innovative and hungry competitors.

    Though I slam Jobs and Apple (justifiably) a fair amount, I recognize the brilliant insight that Jobs had with iTunes, the iPod, the iPhone, and now the iPad. He understood that he could leverage the media environment lock-in that people bought into originally with iTunes and their iPods -- and he used this to lure his customers further and further within his walled garden.

    There is also a fair amount of stickiness with the iPhone that is in part because of those Apps and iTunes. When moving to a new OS, an iTunes library that may or may not be completely transferable. And many folks have Apps they've gotten accustomed to on their iPhones. Those Apps, their contacts and data, also might not be immediately and seamlessly transferable to another OS.

    Yes preferences change, better technology supersedes incumbent tech (i.e. DVD over VHS) -- but in the near term I cannot see what RIM, HP/Palm, M$, or Nokia can reveal that will represent such an "inflection point".

    Needless to say -- by their nature, surprises are what we don't anticipate...
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post
    I agree that M$ has missed out in mobile -- they are like Sony was in music, video, TVs -- a lazy entrenched incumbent, caught asleep by their more innovative and hungry competitors.

    Though I slam Jobs and Apple (justifiably) a fair amount, I recognize the brilliant insight that Jobs had with iTunes, the iPod, the iPhone, and now the iPad. He understood that he could leverage the media environment lock-in that people bought into originally with iTunes and their iPods -- and he used this to lure his customers further and further within his walled garden.

    There is also a fair amount of stickiness with the iPhone that is in part because of those Apps and iTunes. When moving to a new OS, an iTunes library that may or may not be completely transferable. And many folks have Apps they've gotten accustomed to on their iPhones. Those Apps, their contacts and data, also might not be immediately and seamlessly transferable to another OS.

    Yes preferences change, better technology supersedes incumbent tech (i.e. DVD over VHS) -- but in the near term I cannot see what RIM, HP/Palm, M$, or Nokia can reveal that will represent such an "inflection point".

    Needless to say -- by their nature, surprises are what we don't anticipate...
    I can't really argue with anything here, but I think there is more room for smartphones other than Android and ios. There are many millions of people in the U.S. and worldwide that are going to be buying smartphones in the near future. I have no doubts that Apple and Google will be competing for top spot, but I really believe there is room for more than just two, and HP has just a good a shot and anybody else right now.
  11. #11  
    and they didn't mention me, either.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by Workerb33 View Post
    and they didn't mention me, either.
    Not that you deserve any attention.



    The Original Owner of the AT&T Pre3
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by voodoochild View Post
    I can't really argue with anything here, but I think there is more room for smartphones other than Android and ios. There are many millions of people in the U.S. and worldwide that are going to be buying smartphones in the near future. I have no doubts that Apple and Google will be competing for top spot, but I really believe there is room for more than just two, and HP has just a good a shot and anybody else right now.
    I wanted/want Palm to succeed.

    They actually did have a window of opportunity -- one they missed because of a lack of time, resources, inspired management.

    I see nothing in HPs history or current practice that makes me optimististic that they will have the patience and resolve to invest the billions required to make webOS a contender.

    RIM, Nokia, M$, all have advantages that webOS did not/does not have. But I see nothing that would show that any of them will find the smartphone critical mass required to challenge iOS or Android. (or to have much influence on the market, on standards etc.)
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  14. #14  
    Well at the moment its impossible to say what the outcome will be. No one has even an inkling of an idea for what HP has planned for webos, especially a year or two down the road. I guess the main reason I still am optimistic about webos's future is because Jon Rubinstein along with the vast majority of the Palm team are now working for HP. HP does have the resources to make webos a success, they just need some internal influence to get them headed in the right direction.
  15. #15  
    hey if hp pays carriers as google does, there may be a quick push.

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