Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    To me this is no surprise, however, Steve Jobs, must be having a cow.....I am sure this ruling hurts all smart phone app sites & helps all smart phone owners.

    However, Mr. Jobs, threatened to force app writers to only write in computer language, that is not easily ported to other platforms. Apple backtracked on this, when the DOJ expressed it's interest in Apple's decision.

    The DOJ is also investigating the fact, that the App store is controlled completely by Apple not allowing app sales from anyone or a certain app, without Apple's approval. In effect Apple controls what an App costs, if it is allowed to be sold and where it is paced on the app site, (a more or less visible location on the site).

    Take care,

    Jay

    Ruling Allows ‘Jailbreaking’ of iPhones
    By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS, July 26, 2010, Filed at 12:15 p.m. ET

    http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2010...gewanted=print

    WASHINGTON (AP) -- Owners of the iPhone will be able to legally break electronic locks on their devices in order to download software applications that haven't been approved by Apple Inc., according to new government rules announced Monday.

    The decision to allow the practice commonly known as ''jailbreaking'' is one of a handful of new exemptions from a 1998 federal law that prohibits people from bypassing technical measures that companies put on their products to prevent unauthorized uses. The Library of Congress, which oversees the Copyright Office, reviews and authorizes exemptions every three years to ensure that the law does not prevent certain non-infringing use of copyright-protected material.

    In addition to jailbreaking, other exemptions announced Monday would:

    -- allow owners of used cell phones to break access controls on their phones in order to switch wireless carriers.

    -- allow people to break technical protections on video games to investigate or correct security flaws.

    -- allow college professors, film students and documentary filmmakers to break copy-protection measures on DVDs so they can embed clips for educational purposes, criticism, commentary and noncommercial videos.

    -- allow computer owners to bypass the need for external security devices called dongles if the dongle no longer works and cannot be replaced.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2.    #2  
    Hi all,

    Here is much more info. The portion of the article dealing with jail-breaking is highlighted.

    take care,

    Jay

    Apple loses big in DRM ruling: jailbreaks are "fair use"
    By Nate Anderson

    Apple loses big in DRM ruling: jailbreaks are "fair use"

    Every three years, the Library of Congress has the thankless task of listening to people complain about the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. The DMCA forbade most attempts to bypass the digital locks on things like DVDs, music, and computer software, but it also gave the Library the ability to wave its magical copyright wand and make certain DRM cracks legal for three years at a time.

    This time, the Library went (comparatively) nuts, allowing widespread bypassing of the CSS encryption on DVDs, declaring iPhone jailbreaking to be "fair use," and letting consumers crack their legally purchased e-books in order to have them read aloud by computers.

    The exemptions
    The DMCA was passed in 1998, so this is the fourth go-round for the Library. In the past, people have usually complained that DRM prevented them from making legitimate use of items like DVDs—format-shifting a copy to one's iPod, for instance, was forbidden. The Register of Copyrights (who is part of the Library of Congress) dutifully listened to these complaints and then did... very little. Previous exemptions could charitably be described as "parsimonious." After all, if you need a two-minute clip of a film, you could always get it from a VHS tape or by taping a TV screen. Right?

    The Librarian and the Register, cautious folks that they are, have moved slowly, but after more than a decade of the DMCA, they are increasingly willing to acknowledge its harms. That lead to this morning's ruling, which provides DRM circumvention exemptions for the following six classes of works:

    (1) Motion pictures on DVDs that are lawfully made and acquired and that are protected by the Content Scrambling System when circumvention is accomplished solely in order to accomplish the incorporation of short portions of motion pictures into new works for the purpose of criticism or comment, and where the person engaging in circumvention believes and has reasonable grounds for believing that circumvention is necessary to fulfill the purpose of the use in the following instances:

    (i) Educational uses by college and university professors and by college and university film and media studies students; (ii) Documentary filmmaking; (iii) Noncommercial videos.

    (2) Computer programs that enable wireless telephone handsets to execute software applications, where circumvention is accomplished for the sole purpose of enabling interoperability of such applications, when they have been lawfully obtained, with computer programs on the telephone handset.

    (3) Computer programs, in the form of firmware or software, that enable used wireless telephone handsets to connect to a wireless telecommunications network, when circumvention is initiated by the owner of the copy of the computer program solely in order to connect to a wireless telecommunications network and access to the network is authorized by the operator of the network.

    (4) Video games accessible on personal computers and protected by technological protection measures that control access to lawfully obtained works, when circumvention is accomplished solely for the purpose of good faith testing for, investigating, or correcting security flaws or vulnerabilities, if:

    (i) The information derived from the security testing is used primarily to promote the security of the owner or operator of a computer, computer system, or computer network; and (ii) The information derived from the security testing is used or maintained in a manner that does not facilitate copyright infringement or a violation of applicable law.

    (5) Computer programs protected by dongles that prevent access due to malfunction or damage and which are obsolete. A dongle shall be considered obsolete if it is no longer manufactured or if a replacement or repair is no longer reasonably available in the commercial marketplace; and

    (6) Literary works distributed in ebook format when all existing ebook editions of the work (including digital text editions made available by authorized entities) contain access controls that prevent the enabling either of the book’s read-aloud function or of screen readers that render the text into a specialized format.

    The language here can be opaque, so let's parse these a bit.

    DVDs
    First up: DVDs! Previous exemptions have been carved out for college professors who might use film clips in class. But note the broad nature of the new rule—it applies to everyone. As long as you are making a documentary or noncommercial video, you're in.

    The exemption only covers "short portions of motion pictures," since the Register was not convinced that longer portions would necessarily be fair use. And if there's some other way of getting the clips short of bypassing DRM, you should take it.

    According to the official explanatory text (PDF), "Where alternatives to circumvention can be used to achieve the noninfringing purpose, such noncircumventing alternatives should be used." Thus, if you have screen capture software and need only a low-quality copy for some purpose, you should use that.

    But the exemption is a key one, despite its limiting language. As the Librarian of Congress finally admitted, "I agree with the Register that the record demonstrates that it is sometimes necessary to circumvent access controls on DVDs in order to make these kinds of fair uses of short portions of motion pictures."

    Jailbreaking
    The most surprising ruling was on "jailbreaking" one's phone (exemption number two), replacing the company-provided operating system with a hacked version that has fewer limitations. Make no mistake: this was all about Apple. And Apple lost.

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation argued that jailbreaking one's iPhone should be allowed, even though it required one to bypass some DRM and then to reuse a small bit of Apple's copyright firmware code. Apple showed up at the hearings to say, in numerous ways, that the idea was terrible, ridiculous, and illegal. In large part, that was because the limit on jailbreaking was needed to preserve Apple's controlled ecosystem, which the company said was of great value to consumers.

    That might be true, the Register agreed, but what did it have to do with copyright?

    "Apple is not concerned that the practice of jailbreaking will displace sales of its firmware or of iPhones," wrote the Register, explaining her thinking by running through the "four factors" of the fair use test. "Indeed, since one cannot engage in that practice unless one has acquired an iPhone, it would be difficult to make that argument. Rather, the harm that Apple fears is harm to its reputation. Apple is concerned that jailbreaking will breach the integrity of the iPhone's ecosystem. The Register concludes that such alleged adverse effects are not in the nature of the harm that the fourth fair use factor is intended to address."

    And the Register concluded that a jailbroken phone used "fewer than 50 bytes of code out of more than 8 million bytes, or approximately 1/160,000 of the copyrighted work as a whole. Where the alleged infringement consists of the making of an unauthorized derivative work, and the only modifications are so de minimis, the fact that iPhone users are using almost the entire iPhone firmware for the purpose for which it was provided to them by Apple undermines the significance" of Apple's argument.

    The conclusion is sure to irritate Steve Jobs: "On balance, the Register concludes that when one jailbreaks a smartphone in order to make the operating system on that phone interoperable with an independently created application that has not been approved by the maker of the smartphone or the maker of its operating system, the modifications that are made purely for the purpose of such interoperability are fair uses."
    SecuROM and SafeDisc
    Exemption four is quite clear—security research on DRM-limited video games is allowed—but why is it there? What research needs to be done?

    It turns out that the real target here is the DRM itself, specifically two controversial systems called SecuROM and SafeDisc. Professor Alex Halderman, a longtime security researcher in this area, begged the Library to let him investigate these kinds of invasive DRM without legal worries.

    "The evidence relating to SecuROM tends to be highly speculative," said the Register, explaining her approval of the exemption, "but Professor Halderman asserted that this situation has been crying out for an investigation by reputable security researchers in order to rigorously determine the nature of the problem that this system cause[s], and dispel this uncertainty about exactly what's going on. He believed that the prohibition on circumvention is at least in part to blame for the lack of rigorous, independent analysis."

    But the SafeDisc situation is clearer. "In contrast to SecuROM, SafeDisc has created a verifiable security vulnerability on a large number of computers. Opponents of the proposed class did not dispute that SafeDisc created a security vulnerability, but they argued that the security flaw was patched by Microsoft in 2007, without the need of an exemption. However, SafeDisc was preloaded on nearly every copy of Microsoft's Windows XP and Windows 2003 operating systems and was on the market for over six years before a security researcher discovered malware exploiting the security. The vulnerability had the capacity to affect nearly one billion PCs."

    Given what's at stake, the Library decided to allow such security research.

    E-books
    Remember how Amazon got into trouble with publishers for allowing its Kindle to do automated text-to-speech? Publishers objected that this could cut into their audiobook money and that it might violate their rights.

    Amazon may have clamped down on the feature in response, but the Library of Congress has now given users the right to crack e-book DRM in order to hear the words. Exemption number six only applies in cases where there is no alternative; if e-book vendors offer any sort of version that allows screen-reading or text-to-speech, even if the price is significantly higher, people must use that version rather than bypass DRM.

    But if there are no commercial alternatives, e-book buyers are at last legally allowed to bypass DRM.

    The clock is ticking
    Other, broader exemptions were not allowed. Bypassing the DRM on purchased music when the authentication servers have gone dark? Still illegal. Bypassing the DRM on streaming video in order to watch it on non-supported platforms? Nope.

    But the exemptions that did make it were carefully thought out and actually helpful this time around. That's the good news. The bad news is that they must be re-argued every three years, and the Library has taken so long getting its most recent ruling out that that the next review happens just two years from now.

    So enjoy your exemptions while you can.

    Further reading
    The 2006 exemptions (arstechnica.com)
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  3. #3  
    I see this as a big win for both developers who can't get an authorized audience from Apple or Android(and whomever else) but would like to distribute their apps, and consumers who want more choice. But I don't think it will hurt app sites because most people will still use those.

    It is mainly Apple who has the restrictions though. On almost all other platforms, you can install whatever you want. You may get a warning that it's not supported but you can still install it.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  4. #4  
    It looks like carrier exclusivity is no longer enforceable. If is now legal to break the lock on a used phone so you can connect it to a new wireless provider, if the provider you are moving to approves.

    It seems like you can buy an AT&T iPhone, (the phone is now used) break the carrier lock, and connect it to any carrier that will sell you service.
  5. #5  
    these are potentially valuable and important changes -- but if I have understood what I've read accurately, Apple can continue to try to disable (maybe even brick ??) through updates and declare out of warranty jailbroken phones -- without sanction.

    Apple is just not any longer able to (in theory) call the cops break down your door seize your computers -- because you have a jailbroken iPhone.

    I don't think they are compelled to change their behavior -- only that they no longer can pretend to have legal justification to enforce what they insist be our behavior ...
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  6. #6  
    Well the phone usually still functions as intended basically, if you restore it to original firmware. I'm not sure they can be held liable for "breaking" a jailbreak with their updates. They just can no longer tell you to stop jailbreaking. Unless they really do deliberately brick your phone. That would be uncalled for since you now own the phone and they have no right to disable it just because you modded it.

    Which also brings to mind Motorola and their crap. I wonder what they'll do after this. Android phone updates(official ones anyway) also break root and also can refuse updates to non-official firmware. But I think only Motorola outright bricks the phone. I've seen them claim this isn't true though, just that they locked the bootloader to prevent modding but they don't brick phones. You just have to use approved software. Either way, I think they are also going to need to be looked at since you can no longer be prevented from using software not approved by the manufacturer.

    Motorola responds to Droid X bootloader controversy, says eFuse isn't there to break the phone -- Engadget
    Last edited by The Phone Diva; 07/26/2010 at 07:32 PM.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  7.    #7  
    Hi all,

    The DOJ is investigating a number of issue within the cell/smart phone industry....locked to one carrier is an issue...

    The DOJ is also looking at Apple's practices, including those we are discussing. I assume there will be legal action about these very issues, that MAY help to clear this up.

    Jail-braking is something I don't very much about it...but I assume someone will find a workaround if Apple in effect "locks you out" with an update. My guess is this scenario is more likely now more than ever!

    Take care,

    Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  8. #8  
    I have been reading on this kind of stuff for a few hours now and I can't see what has changed.

    There are unlocking services. Doesn't that mean it was already legal to unlock your phone? Is the big impediment really an exclusive contract to offer App store and Update access? When your contract ends, you get an unlock and go to another carrier, you must lose app store access. Does your phone stop updating? It confuses me.

    I guess I understand how jailbreaking was illegal. But it doesn't seem like anyone ever enforced it. How does the ruling change anything?
  9. #9  
    Doesn't a service provider have the ability to restrict access to unapproved equipment? So how does making Jailbreaking legal do anything? If you installed unapproved software, they could still stop your service couldn't they? They just couldn't pursue criminal charges? Has that ever happened?
  10.    #10  
    Dear SF handyman,

    You are asking excellent questions!

    1. I don't know the answer to them, as this is an area way over my head.

    2. I think this issue will become clearer in a few more weeks, as the dust settles from it. However, I can't imagine Jobs is happy with it and he will try to block jail-broken phones, b/c he doesn't play nice with other children!

    Take care,

    Jay

    PS. Is beach blanket babylon still running??? I saw it about 5 years ago.

    I'm sure they have had a great deal to add to it, with new politicians to mock everyone from Obama to Palin! I must get back to SF one day soon. However, I really miss NYC, it has been 2 years since my last visit. I lived there for almost 40 years... I still miss B'way!
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by SFHandyman View Post
    ...
    I guess I understand how jailbreaking was illegal. But it doesn't seem like anyone ever enforced it. How does the ruling change anything?
    I agree it was illegal -- its not now.

    You can now legally unlock your phone after your contract ends (no matter if your carrier objects). You can now legally unlock your iPhone and use "unapproved" Apps.

    Most if not all of this could and was already done, so maybe not much has changed. But Apple and the carriers no longer have the law on their side, and maybe that's important. It might ultimately become so -- depending on how all this is eventually interpreted, enforced, and implemented -- by Apple etc. in response.
    Last edited by BARYE; 07/26/2010 at 08:25 PM.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  12.    #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post
    I agree it was illegal -- its not now.

    You can now legally unlock your phone after your contract ends (no matter if your carrier objects). You can now legally unlock your iPhone and use "unapproved" Apps.

    Most if not all of this could and was already done, so maybe not much has changed. But Apple and the carriers no longer have the law on their side, and maybe that's important. It might ultimately become so -- depending on how all this is eventually interpreted, enforced, and implemented -- by Apple etc. in response.
    hi all,

    I still think Jobs is having a cow....after all, I think this is going to lead to many apps writers going around Jobs and not selling on the Iphone Apps site...which means he wouldn't be raking in 40% of each dollar of each sale....selling music and apps makes Apple a great deal of $!

    Keep in mind, currently HE decides which apps are sold, and for how much, same thing with music. Plus you can only download form HIS site, with smart phones, mp3 players that HE approves...you can only use the carrier that HE wants you to use. (Since most smart/cell phones sold in the USA are subsided by the carrier, you are locked to them. However, does Apple allow you to buy a Iphone in/for the USA that is not subsidized)?

    I also think that we will slowly be moving to a system where phones will be made to work on ALL carriers of your choice.... and hopefully all apps will be available on all platforms.

    Take care,

    jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert View Post

    I still think Jobs is having a cow....after all, I think this is going to lead to many apps writers going around Jobs and not selling on the Iphone Apps site...which means he wouldn't be raking in 40% of each dollar of each sale....selling music and apps makes Apple a great deal of $!

    Keep in mind, currently HE decides which apps are sold, and for how much, same thing with music. Plus you can only download form HIS site, with smart phones, mp3 players that HE approves...you can only use the carrier that HE wants you to use.

    agree with all that. Apple has made Ginormous amounts of cash because of the handcuffs they've been able to put onto its users. All companies are incredibly jealous of what Apple has been able to get away with. Sony in particular.

    Jobs HATES open environments because it loses him his toll booth -- and opens him up to competition.


    (Since most smart/cell phones sold in the USA are subsided by the carrier, you are locked to them. However, does Apple allow you to buy a Iphone in/for the USA that is not subsidized)?

    I also think that we will slowly be moving to a system where phones will be made to work on ALL carriers of your choice.... and hopefully all apps will be available on all platforms.

    No.

    You will not see an unsubsidized unlocked universal smartphone get much market share in the US.

    How many unsubsidized unlocked Nexus Ones sold ??? How many unsubsidized unlocked Palm PREs sold ??
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  14. #14  
    iPhone and Pre+ user chiming in here. Meh. Nothing’s really changed. The manufacturers are protected by their EULAs, and they can always decline to warrant the phones.

    iPhone Dev chiming in here. Big F***ing PITA. Almost everyone here and on tech sites knows that there’s plenty of wares sites out there with non-authorized copies of hundreds of cracked apps, and a few that purport to work alongside the iTunes store. Now I’ve got more portals to cruise, more potential “storez” to deal with, more billing headaches to chase down. More IT and support calls and emails coming in from jamokes that have cracked phones and whine about my apps not working. Apple/BB/WinMo’s portals gives me one client, one vendor, one billing conduit - the ruling gives me more headaches to cope with and will eat into my bottom line, and will likely cost me a bit more in attorney’s fees sending out desist orders.

    The LoC ruling did me absolutely no favors. Anyone telling me there won’t be a problem with more wares stores popping up is smoking the really happy stuff. And everybody wants free/cheap apps? Meh.
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by SFHandyman View Post
    I have been reading on this kind of stuff for a few hours now and I can't see what has changed.

    There are unlocking services. Doesn't that mean it was already legal to unlock your phone? Is the big impediment really an exclusive contract to offer App store and Update access? When your contract ends, you get an unlock and go to another carrier, you must lose app store access. Does your phone stop updating? It confuses me.

    I guess I understand how jailbreaking was illegal. But it doesn't seem like anyone ever enforced it. How does the ruling change anything?
    Concerning both iPhone and Android, the stores are independent of the carrier, or should be. But carriers have blocked certain marketplace Android apps from appearing for download on the phone(a locked one anyway). If you're on one that hates tethering without paying them, lets say. And we've already seen AT&T hold up iPhone apps for everyone, even those not on AT&T.

    But I dont think you're locked out of the store itself even if you switch carriers. People have been using the iPhone on T-Mobile even before this ruling and I'm sure they're dowloading apps from the App Store. We would have heard otherwise by now. Apple would also be turning down money if they only allow AT&T customers to download.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by SFHandyman View Post
    Doesn't a service provider have the ability to restrict access to unapproved equipment? So how does making Jailbreaking legal do anything? If you installed unapproved software, they could still stop your service couldn't they? They just couldn't pursue criminal charges? Has that ever happened?
    AT&T already stops unapproved Android apps and I wonder if this will have any effect on that.

    But them shutting off service sounds punitive and anti-competitive as well as anti-consumer. I'd like to see how well that'd go over. People have been using unapproved apps before and it doesn't destroy the infrastructure of the carrier like Apple claims.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  17.    #17  
    APPLE 2010 VS THE MOVIE STUDIOS OF THE 1930'S THRU THE EARLY 1950'S.

    Years ago, the DOJ broke up the movie biz.....

    A1. long term studio contracts were out, (up until that time the studio OWNED you, without their permission you couldn't work without their approval).

    B1. You only were GIVEN roles, not roles you necessarily wanted.

    C1. wanted the studios could no longer own the movie theaters, etc....

    D1. The studios could no longer put minorities in roles that could be cut out of the story for use in the south, (The fabulous Lena Horne, was frequently cast in roles that were edited out, for theaters in the Southern USA).

    E1. Control of an actor thru ownership contracts, was international... IE: Bette Davis refused to take the roles Warner Bros. wanted her to take........ she left the USA and went to the UK to make movies. Both the USA & UK courts refused to allow her to act in roles, other than what Warner decided.

    F1. You were type cast, if the studio like you as a gangster, then you were a gangster...ie: James Cagney was Broadway trained as a singer and dancer...yet almost all of his roles the studio FORCED him to play a gangster.

    Now look at the similarities of controlling the movie business and control at Apple

    I am hoping that is what will happen to Apple. Jobs has too much control over the Iphone system...actually I should say the Smart Phone business, as it does effect other smart phones & other smart phone platforms (see below):

    After all, Jobs:

    1. Owns the app store

    2. Decides what apps can be sold

    3. Tells the app writer, how much the app to sell for

    4. Tells app creators, either take 60/40 split or it's no deal

    5. Prevents other apps not sold thru his system to be used on the phone, unless the Iphone is jail broken.

    6. Can get around jail braking by in effect bricking the phone, in effect telling the customer it's my way or the highway...

    7. Tells performers how much they can sell a song for.

    8. When Jobs learns that Palm now Palm/HP, found a way to port apps using two different protocols to webOS with very little work. This must have particularly made him crazy, because the people who figured out how to port apps to webOS, used to work for Jobs @ Apple. He then decided to ban the use of the two most common app computer languages, in new apps. Thus assuring that apps couldn't easily be ported to other platforms.

    Is it just me or is this a monopoly????

    Does this sound like price fixing???

    The DOJ was already nosing around before #8 on my list,

    a. but that really got the DOJ crazy...so crazy that Jobs actually blinked and back down.

    b. It was also the pressure of an insurrection from app writers, who didn't want to or weren't able to write in the only language that Jobs wanted them to work in....the one that conveniently is very difficult to port to other platforms.... Now he will allow new apps to be written in what ever computer language they want.

    After all, app writers see the fact that android has taken off (& hopefully webOS with HP's power of the triple "M", (money, marketing & manpower).

    They don't want to have to completely write totally differ apps codes, when they could use computer code that converts.

    I am curious to see if anyone else see Apple as a near monopoly or monopoly thru all of this.

    Even if the DOJ doesn't force the issue into the courts, the threat of federal legal court action has already started to shape the argument. It should be interesting to see how this all plays out!

    Take care,

    Jay

    PS sorry about any typos, this has been a very, very long day for me!
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  18. #18  
    One thing.

    He doesn't brick phones though. Unless something's changed, you could always choose to upgrade and/or restore, you just lose your jailbreak. But he never bricked the phones from working as intended.

    There was a rumor by some supposed employee going around that iOS4 will shut off your phones if you're not on AT&T(or probably any "authorized" carrier), but has that ever been confirmed? Also it sounds blatantly anti-competitive. If they did that, I'm sure there'd be another uproar.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!

Posting Permissions