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  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    FYI, actually it is very interesting!

    Take care,

    Jay

    Dear Rabid Apple Fans: Your precious Mac club is being disbanded. Blame iPad.
    By Jason Perlow | July 22, 2010, 2:46pm PDT

    Dear Rabid Apple Fans: Your precious Mac club is being disbanded. Blame iPad. | ZDNet

    Within four years, iPad users will vastly outnumber Macs. And to the elitist Macintosh faithful, that news is too difficult to bear.

    Today my long-time colleague and friend Mary-Jo Foley, probably the most seasoned Microsoft reporter in the entire industry made a revelation: She bought an iPad. And she loves it.

    I think we can all agree that the summer is slow on tech news, and that even the best of us run short of material. God knows, this happens to me probably every week, and it forces me to get creative.

    But Mary-Jo declaring that she’s joining the Apple iPad ranks is important for its non-eventness alone, because this is evidence that the canary in the coal mine is dropping dead. And that canary is the Age of Elitism for Apple users.

    In all truthfulness, I debated whether or not I was going to write a blog entry on Mary Jo buying her iPad. I didn’t think it was that important.

    After all, I bought one, and I wouldn’t call myself the biggest Apple fan in the world. The device serves its purpose for me and it does what it needs to do. I ascribe absolutely zero religious or ideological motivation in the purchase whatsoever. It’s just a friggin’ tablet.

    But then I read this response on MacDailyNews and it got me thinking. Mac fans sound like they are seriously threatened by the Average Mary-Jo buying iPads, aren’t they?

    How did they react? Not “Welcome to the club” or “Cool, she likes it” but instead in their first sentence they go as far to call her a “Luddite Soccer Mom”, albeit in jest.

    The very idea that Mary-Jo is a Luddite or even a Soccer Mom is totally ridiculous, as she’s one of the most feminist and technologically progressive career women I’ve ever met.

    But wait, there’s more. They also want to “Vomit” if they read any more of Mary Jo’s piece and that as she’s “lived her life denying herself the best” for not having owned Apple product before, she therefore has “no credibility” with her opinions about the device and is also “cheap”.

    What does this sound like to me? It sounds like elitism. It sounds like the typical Mac ****** crap that most of us regular people have been enduring from these twits for more than two decades.

    This is not how you welcome people into your community, Mactards. This is how you alienate them.

    The funny thing is about all of this is that while Mary Jo is certainly no Soccer Mom, or even a technological neophyte or a Luddite, that’s exactly the sort of person the iPad is targeted at. And that’s primarily who’ll be buying them. In the many tens of millions over the next few years. Most of which have never owned an Apple computer of any kind before. Many will have never even purchased an iPod either.

    Tens of millions of iPad owners and Apple neophytes is a Mac elitist’s worst nightmare. Suddenly, the price of entry to become an Apple computer owner is no longer the equivalent to a major down payment on a luxury automobile. It’s no longer exclusive. For just $500.00 anybody can own an Apple computer.

    And that scares the living crap out of Mac fanatics.

    At the 2009 Apple World Wide Developer’s conference (WWDC) acting Apple CEO Phil Schiller stated there were 75 million Mac users worldwide. All indications are that the current rate of growth for Mac use is that it is relatively flat — the Macs which are being bought (and in reported record numbers) are for the most part replacing the ones in the current population in North America. The recently reported growth numbers in Asia are certainly encouraging for Apple, but then again PC sales in Asia are extremely commodity and extremely high volume anyway.

    [Note: I'm well aware of latest Apple sales reports that they sold more Macs last quarter than any quarter previous. That's a very good sign for replacement or expansion, but there is still very little market data other than Apple's own Chief Financial Officer's opinion to suggest that Macs are displacing or outselling Windows PCs in large quantities globally.]

    Of those 75 million users, approximately 60-70 percent of them are probably in North America. That would amount to about 52.5 million if you estimate on the high end.

    The early iPad purchasing trend indicates that within three years, we’ll see anywhere between 50 and 80 million iPad users worldwide, as an extremely conservative estimate. And virtually all of them are going to be in the US, as the rest of the world is likely to latch onto Android instead.

    Now, let’s be perfectly clear. Macs aren’t going away anytime soon. It’s an important platform for digital content creation and obviously, it’s the required and only platform for programming iOS apps, at least for the time being.

    However, there can be little denying that most of the emphasis on application development for Apple products is for iOS, not for the Mac. The 2010 Apple World Wide Developer’s Conference was almost entirely dedicated to the iOS platform. It was by its own admission “The Center of the App Universe.” And when Apple means App, it means App Store.

    I do believe that eventually, the Mac OS will be completely eclipsed by iOS. That day may not come for four or five years. Perhaps even six. But when it does happen, “normal” people will outnumber Mac users by a significant margin.

    These aren’t power users, they aren’t digital content creation professionals, these are people that just want to get things done with devices — their web browsing, their email, their multimedia content consumption, their document viewing and editing, their social networking and their games.

    They’ll have zero interest in OS wars, and will have no institutional history with the Macintosh or fanboyism or Mac Culture at all. The only thing they will care about is can their appliance computer work to do what they need it to do, and when will their latest Apps come out. Beyond that, they won’t care a whit about being part of an exclusive club.

    And why is that? Because Apple now knows that their market is average people, and that they need to sell as many devices as possible in order to make money on their App Store. That means huge volumes of shipped consumer electronics and the elimination of platform elitism. To succeed, Apple knows it has to throw their existing fan base under the bus.

    Good riddance. Sayonara, *******es.

    Will the Culture of Mac Fanboyism come to an end with the popularity of the iPad?
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2.    #2  
    Hi all,

    Now for a different take on the subject.

    Take care,

    Jay

    Apple: Still a Mac company now?

    By David Morgenstern | July 22, 2010, 7:03pm PDT


    Apple: Still a Mac company now? | ZDNet

    While crowing this week over its record quarterly sales of 3.47 million Macs in its latest fiscal reports, Apple opened up a bit on who’s buying the iPhone 4 and iPad. Of course, they are Windows users.

    Apple Chief Operating Officer Tim Cook pointed to the deployment of iPhones in the enterprise, a market that is certainly Windows country.

    If you look at the iPhone, we’re now up to more than 80 percent of the Fortune 100 that are deploying or piloting the iPhone, and we also see very good momentum in the Fortune 500. In fact, over 60 percent of the Fortune 500 are deploying or piloting iPhone. This is also transcending into education institution, and we see around 400 higher education institutions, which have included the iPhone for faculty, staff and students.

    And on the iPad front, it appeared to be a similar story.

    The iPad, very surprisingly in the first quarter, during the first 90 days we already have 50 percent of the Fortune 500 that are deploying or testing the iPad. This is incredible. That is the Fortune 100, excuse me.

    Of course, the iPhone and iPad aren’t Mac products, nor are they designed to connect only to Macs. Rather, these devices are their own iOS platform that can connect to either Macs or PCs. Apple makes software for Mac and Windows hosts that support the Apple mobile Internet and AV content devices.

    My ZDNet colleague Mary-Jo Foley at All About Microsoft just posted about buying her first Apple product. This decision wasn’t an easy one for her and she had to overcome the Wintel derision often voiced by Mac fans. Or as she put it: “the negative, hostile and condescending interactions with not just Apple *******, but regular Apple users.”

    But the lure of the iPad was too much for even her.

    Microsoft has promised that its partners have some cool slates running Windows 7 coming this year. If they’re out there, they’ve waited too long to show/leak them. If I had felt there was a compelling Windows slate that would ship this year, I’d have refrained happily from buying an iPad.

    At Microsoft’s consumer showcase in New York in June, there were lots of Windows 7 PCs on display, but not a single slate. (When I asked one Microsoft evangelist why I shouldn’t buy an iPad, he retorted “You have five hundred bucks. Go buy one” instead of offering me anything concrete to convince me otherwise.) I say show me a Windows 7 slate with 10+-hour battery life, instant on/off (i.e., hibernation that really works), and an interface that is as fun and responsive as the iPad’s and I’d still consider buying one.

    Sure you would … not! After making an investment in time, content and software in the iPad, will users really move off the iPad platform and onto a Wintel slate with fewer programs and less support? Maybe not.

    Later in the Apple analyst call, Cook responded to a question about the analyst refrain over the past few months that there would be significant cannibalization of Mac purchases by the iPad. The question asked whether instead, the Mac might see a halo effect from the iPad. Remember that more than half of the customers buying new Macs in the Apple retail stores are Windows users.

    … I do agree that I think most people external to Apple focus on cannibalization has been negative, and internally we are focused on exactly the opposite the synergy between both technically and from a demand point of view. If you look at the iPod historically, all of the people here felt that the iPod created a halo for the Mac, and in fact as the iPod volumes kick off you will see a dramatic change in the Mac sales back in time that we experienced.

    And so could that happen on iPhone and iPad. You know, we’ll see. I don’t want to predict it but I do think that with our Mac share, the Mac has outgrown the market 17 straight quarters.

    However, the Mac share is still low and so there is still an enormous opportunity for the Mac to grow and certainly the more customers we can introduce to Apple through iPads and through iPhones and through iPods, you would think that there would might be some synergy with the Mac there, and there may be synergy between the iPad and the iPhones and so on and so forth and so that’s the way that we look at it internally instead of the negative although I know everybody is more focused on the negative piece of it.
    You know, this is for it’s great to be to have a lower share because if it turns out that the iPad cannibalizes PCs that I think it’s fantastic for us because there is a lot of PCs to cannibalize. It’s still a big market.

    Welcome to Apple, Ms. Foley. Your Mac is waiting for you.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert View Post
    Hi all,

    FYI, actually it is very interesting!

    Take care,

    Jay

    Dear Rabid Apple Fans: Your precious Mac club is being disbanded. Blame iPad.
    By Jason Perlow | July 22, 2010, 2:46pm PDT

    Dear Rabid Apple Fans: Your precious Mac club is being disbanded. Blame iPad. | ZDNet

    Within four years, iPad users will vastly outnumber Macs. And to the elitist Macintosh faithful, that news is too difficult to bear.

    Today my long-time colleague and friend Mary-Jo Foley, probably the most seasoned Microsoft reporter in the entire industry made a revelation: She bought an iPad. And she loves it.

    I think we can all agree that the summer is slow on tech news, and that even the best of us run short of material. God knows, this happens to me probably every week, and it forces me to get creative.

    But Mary-Jo declaring that she’s joining the Apple iPad ranks is important for its non-eventness alone, because this is evidence that the canary in the coal mine is dropping dead. And that canary is the Age of Elitism for Apple users.

    In all truthfulness, I debated whether or not I was going to write a blog entry on Mary Jo buying her iPad. I didn’t think it was that important.

    After all, I bought one, and I wouldn’t call myself the biggest Apple fan in the world. The device serves its purpose for me and it does what it needs to do. I ascribe absolutely zero religious or ideological motivation in the purchase whatsoever. It’s just a friggin’ tablet.

    But then I read this response on MacDailyNews and it got me thinking. Mac fans sound like they are seriously threatened by the Average Mary-Jo buying iPads, aren’t they?

    How did they react? Not “Welcome to the club” or “Cool, she likes it” but instead in their first sentence they go as far to call her a “Luddite Soccer Mom”, albeit in jest.

    The very idea that Mary-Jo is a Luddite or even a Soccer Mom is totally ridiculous, as she’s one of the most feminist and technologically progressive career women I’ve ever met.

    But wait, there’s more. They also want to “Vomit” if they read any more of Mary Jo’s piece and that as she’s “lived her life denying herself the best” for not having owned Apple product before, she therefore has “no credibility” with her opinions about the device and is also “cheap”.

    What does this sound like to me? It sounds like elitism. It sounds like the typical Mac ****** crap that most of us regular people have been enduring from these twits for more than two decades.

    This is not how you welcome people into your community, Mactards. This is how you alienate them.

    The funny thing is about all of this is that while Mary Jo is certainly no Soccer Mom, or even a technological neophyte or a Luddite, that’s exactly the sort of person the iPad is targeted at. And that’s primarily who’ll be buying them. In the many tens of millions over the next few years. Most of which have never owned an Apple computer of any kind before. Many will have never even purchased an iPod either.

    Tens of millions of iPad owners and Apple neophytes is a Mac elitist’s worst nightmare. Suddenly, the price of entry to become an Apple computer owner is no longer the equivalent to a major down payment on a luxury automobile. It’s no longer exclusive. For just $500.00 anybody can own an Apple computer.

    And that scares the living crap out of Mac fanatics.

    At the 2009 Apple World Wide Developer’s conference (WWDC) acting Apple CEO Phil Schiller stated there were 75 million Mac users worldwide. All indications are that the current rate of growth for Mac use is that it is relatively flat — the Macs which are being bought (and in reported record numbers) are for the most part replacing the ones in the current population in North America. The recently reported growth numbers in Asia are certainly encouraging for Apple, but then again PC sales in Asia are extremely commodity and extremely high volume anyway.

    [Note: I'm well aware of latest Apple sales reports that they sold more Macs last quarter than any quarter previous. That's a very good sign for replacement or expansion, but there is still very little market data other than Apple's own Chief Financial Officer's opinion to suggest that Macs are displacing or outselling Windows PCs in large quantities globally.]

    Of those 75 million users, approximately 60-70 percent of them are probably in North America. That would amount to about 52.5 million if you estimate on the high end.

    The early iPad purchasing trend indicates that within three years, we’ll see anywhere between 50 and 80 million iPad users worldwide, as an extremely conservative estimate. And virtually all of them are going to be in the US, as the rest of the world is likely to latch onto Android instead.

    Now, let’s be perfectly clear. Macs aren’t going away anytime soon. It’s an important platform for digital content creation and obviously, it’s the required and only platform for programming iOS apps, at least for the time being.

    However, there can be little denying that most of the emphasis on application development for Apple products is for iOS, not for the Mac. The 2010 Apple World Wide Developer’s Conference was almost entirely dedicated to the iOS platform. It was by its own admission “The Center of the App Universe.” And when Apple means App, it means App Store.

    I do believe that eventually, the Mac OS will be completely eclipsed by iOS. That day may not come for four or five years. Perhaps even six. But when it does happen, “normal” people will outnumber Mac users by a significant margin.

    These aren’t power users, they aren’t digital content creation professionals, these are people that just want to get things done with devices — their web browsing, their email, their multimedia content consumption, their document viewing and editing, their social networking and their games.

    They’ll have zero interest in OS wars, and will have no institutional history with the Macintosh or fanboyism or Mac Culture at all. The only thing they will care about is can their appliance computer work to do what they need it to do, and when will their latest Apps come out. Beyond that, they won’t care a whit about being part of an exclusive club.

    And why is that? Because Apple now knows that their market is average people, and that they need to sell as many devices as possible in order to make money on their App Store. That means huge volumes of shipped consumer electronics and the elimination of platform elitism. To succeed, Apple knows it has to throw their existing fan base under the bus.

    Good riddance. Sayonara, *******es.

    Will the Culture of Mac Fanboyism come to an end with the popularity of the iPad?
    tl;dr
  4. #4  
    With the current OS X update trends, I am more than willing to bet OS X will exceed further than iOS will ever dream. Anyone who has used OS X 10.0 up until now, 10.6, would agree.

    Apple is trying to make a strong stand in the mobile dept and are doing a damn good job at it.

    I believe Apple will continue building the reliable computers that they always have, while scaring the pants off the mobile maket with everything else that is up their sleeves.
  5. #5  
    I was a Windows user that bought an iPad. I bought a Mac soon after. Using an iPad made me much less tolerant of MS Windows' bloat and complexity.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by ADGrant View Post
    I was a Windows user that bought an iPad. I bought a Mac soon after. Using an iPad made me much less tolerant of MS Windows' bloat and complexity.
    Could you explain what bloat and complexity you experienced with Windows 7?
  7. #7  
    Macs are indeed cleaner for the most part. The Windows bloat is caused by manufacturers cramming in too many programs that people may or may not want. Unless you build your own system and/or have a clean Windows CD copy. However Windows itself is easy for normal use. If you're trying to tinker however, you should probably know what you're doing. And make backups. But that could likely be the case for Macs too.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Brain Mantis View Post
    Could you explain what bloat and complexity you experienced with Windows 7?
    I have never used Windows 7, so no I cannot.
  9. #9  
    Oh, then you would be rather surprised haha. But k...just wondering cause i have had nothing but good experience with Windows 7.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    Macs are indeed cleaner for the most part. The Windows bloat is caused by manufacturers cramming in too many programs that people may or may not want. Unless you build your own system and/or have a clean Windows CD copy. However Windows itself is easy for normal use. If you're trying to tinker however, you should probably know what you're doing. And make backups. But that could likely be the case for Macs too.
    I did build my last few Windows systems from parts so never had to worry about crapware. However, every time an app is installed it adds stuff to the registry and often adds a companion app to the startup. The registry can get corrupted, apps can refuse to install, the stupid file locking policy makes it harder to do backups etc etc. I am a Windows (& Unix) application developer so I am quite capable of handling the complexity. It was a refreshing change to use a Mac though. Worked great out of the box, no crapware, a fast email client etc. Backups are trivial, just plugin an external hard drive. The unix command line is a mouse click away.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    Macs are indeed cleaner for the most part. The Windows bloat is caused by manufacturers cramming in too many programs that people may or may not want. Unless you build your own system and/or have a clean Windows CD copy. However Windows itself is easy for normal use. If you're trying to tinker however, you should probably know what you're doing. And make backups. But that could likely be the case for Macs too.
    Apple does what it always does...focus on UI/user experience.

    However for the average user...just a Joe Schmo who uses the internet, word editing and listens to music and manages photo....i've yet to be convinced of a reason why Macs are easier to use than windows.

    But then again, the people that actually use Mac's to their advantage are never the ones to say "well its just easier."
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by Brain Mantis View Post
    Oh, then you would be rather surprised haha. But k...just wondering cause i have had nothing but good experience with Windows 7.
    Windows 7 probably seems fantastic if you have been using Vista but it still has a much bigger memory footprint than XP.
  13. #13  
    I've almost noticed the opposite happening. I am a college student, and I would say 90% of my friends my age have a new macbook pro, mostly the 13's. On my campus macs are just a common as PC's, and none of the kids who do have macs have any type of elitism that a lot of Apple users I find online have. I think a lot of people my age are attracted to Macbooks because of their aesthetic design and ease of use, and exceptional battery life. Most of them don't care about any type of platform wars, they just want a good reliable computer to get them through the day.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by Brain Mantis View Post
    Apple does what it always does...focus on UI/user experience.

    However for the average user...just a Joe Schmo who uses the internet, word editing and listens to music and manages photo....i've yet to be convinced of a reason why Macs are easier to use than windows.

    But then again, the people that actually use Mac's to their advantage are never the ones to say "well its just easier."
    The Mac ships with great photo management software, iTunes and a good email client. You just need a Word Processing program (I use MS Word). I am convinced that Macs are easier to use than Windows but unlike you I use both operating systems, Windows more than Mac.
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by ADGrant View Post
    The Mac ships with great photo management software, iTunes and a good email client. You just need a Word Processing program (I use MS Word). I am convinced that Macs are easier to use than Windows but unlike you I use both operating systems, Windows more than Mac.
    You didn't' really address anything:

    iTunes - On both platforms.
    Email - Windows Mail...based on Outlook, one of the best email programs.
    Word Processing - Word on both
    Photo management - Windows Photo gallery.


    Again, all of these are vista/windows 7 only but Windows Live Essentials isn't playing 2nd fiddle to anything Apple develops.

    Now, video editing...i'll give that to Mac for ease. But other than that, i'm not convinced a general consumer using for the above basic features will find anything easier on Mac then Windows 7...if you can be specific that would be better, but i've used both and they are equal in my eyes on basic uses.
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by Brain Mantis View Post
    Could you explain what bloat and complexity you experienced with Windows 7?
    Antivirus and spyware software.
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by Brain Mantis View Post
    You didn't' really address anything:

    iTunes - On both platforms.
    Email - Windows Mail...based on Outlook, one of the best email programs.
    Word Processing - Word on both
    Photo management - Windows Photo gallery.


    Again, all of these are vista/windows 7 only but Windows Live Essentials isn't playing 2nd fiddle to anything Apple develops.

    Now, video editing...i'll give that to Mac for ease. But other than that, i'm not convinced a general consumer using for the above basic features will find anything easier on Mac then Windows 7...if you can be specific that would be better, but i've used both and they are equal in my eyes on basic uses.
    Outlook is an awful email program, one of the worse. iTunes seems to work better on the Mac and MS Word 2008 doesn't waste nearly as much screen real estate as Office 2007 on the PC.

    As for photo browsing, its built in to the Finder on a Mac , you don't need to launch iPhoto or Aperture most of the time.

    And on a Mac, backing everything up is trivial.
  18. #18  
    However, Secunia's a company that may be self serving. Is this the same company that blasted Android?

    Apple the new world leader in software insecurity
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    Macs are indeed cleaner for the most part. The Windows bloat is caused by manufacturers cramming in too many programs that people may or may not want. Unless you build your own system and/or have a clean Windows CD copy. However Windows itself is easy for normal use. If you're trying to tinker however, you should probably know what you're doing. And make backups. But that could likely be the case for Macs too.
    I used to always buy Dell, but I moved to Mac about 2 years ago.
    I use Parallels for Windows to run AutoCad, StruCalc, and 3D Models/Rendering.
    But that's all I use it for.
    I have like 3-5 programs I use, that's it.
    Everything else is ran from the Mac Side.
    My whole business is dependent on staying up and running, and Mac hasn't let me down.
    Just call me Berd.
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by ADGrant View Post
    Outlook is an awful email program, one of the worse. iTunes seems to work better on the Mac and MS Word 2008 doesn't waste nearly as much screen real estate as Office 2007 on the PC.

    As for photo browsing, its built in to the Finder on a Mac , you don't need to launch iPhoto or Aperture most of the time.

    And on a Mac, backing everything up is trivial.
    Outlook is awful? Agree to disagree i guess. I think in the days of 20"+ monitors screen real estae isn't an issue for most on MS word.

    and photo browsing is also built in to the file browser..but Windows Gallery is equal to iPhoto.

    Backing up is also trivial on windows 7. Hook up an external HDD start Windows Backup....i haven't touched my settings since i did that.

    Also Time Machine...visually pleasing as hell..but its really no more functional than Windows 7 version.

    Wifi network selection is now as painless as OSX:


    haha...i think we both enjoy the OS we use so we can prob. stop going in circle but I think both are very good and each have their own positives and negatives.
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