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  1.    #1  
    So here it is guy's fresh from HP's site, all 7 final iterations of the windows 7 slate!!!!

    SPECS:
    http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?...m=1&letter=ALL

    HP Site:

    https://h10057.www1.hp.com/ecomcat/h...05/XB858PA.htm

    https://h10057.www1.hp.com/ecomcat/h...05/XB857PA.htm

    https://h10057.www1.hp.com/ecomcat/h...05/XB834PA.htm

    ...all other 5 are the same, the number just changes from 1001-1008!!

    So maybe they ain't ditching this after all!

    Source: Engadget
  2. #2  
    they never said they where... Hp will use it's own name for windows 7, and palm's for webos..
  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by nimer55 View Post
    they never said they where... Hp will use it's own name for windows 7, and palm's for webos..
    Actually, they was MUCH justified speculation that it got pulled AFTER Palm acquisition:

    HP Slate killed? Rumor mill says 'yes' -- Engadget

    http://www.precentral.net/hp-kills-windows-7-slate
  4. #4  
    Hi all,

    Here is a little more on the HP slate, I am not sure what to believe at this point! Take care,

    Jay

    HP Quashes Rumors of Slate Demise

    By AGAM SHAH of IDG News Service\New York Bureau, IDG, July 21, 2010

    HP Quashes Rumors of Slate Demise - NYTimes.com

    Hewlett-Packard on Wednesday quashed rumors of HP Slate's demise, saying the tablet with the Windows 7 OS may still be sold to customers.

    "We are in customer evaluations now and will make a determination soon on the next steps," said HP spokeswoman Marlene Somsak in an e-mail.

    HP in January announced plans to offer HP Slate with Microsoft's Windows 7 OS, and a prototype was displayed during Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer's keynote at the Consumer Electronics Show that month. HP then announced in April that it was buying Palm for US$1.2 billion and said it would put Palm's WebOS mobile OS on a range of devices including tablets. That fueled speculation about HP scuttling its Slate plans, as power-hungry Windows 7 is not ideal for handheld tablet devices.

    "We hadn't anticipated the Palm acquisition when we first shared our plans for that product," Somsak said.

    HP has openly said it wants to put WebOS in tablets, but Somsak declined comment on the company's plans.

    Events from earlier this week point to HP possibly launching Windows and WebOS tablets.

    The company listed the HP Slate 500 on its website, a hint that the product is still alive.

    According to product details, the Slate includes an 8.9-inch touchscreen and runs on Windows 7 Premium. It has two cameras -- video and still -- and accepts pen and touch input. It is listed as Energy Star-qualified, and the Energy Star website says the Slate has a 1.6GHz processor and 1GB of memory.

    HP's plans to launch a WebOS tablet also may have taken a step forward with the company's application to trademark the term Palmpad with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The trademark is related to goods and services for a range of hardware including "handheld and mobile computers, PDAs, electronic notepads, mobile digital electronic devices," according to the USPTO document. The Palmpad trademark filing was first reported by Engadget.

    HP's Somsak declined to comment on the Palmpad trademark filing.

    HP has a long history of partnering with Microsoft and offers the Windows Mobile operating system on its iPaq smartphones for consumers and businesses. The company also offers Windows 7 on low-cost netbooks.

    If released, it's a toss-up whether the HP Slate would be targeted at consumers or enterprises, said John Spooner, an analyst at Technology Business Research.

    "Based on hardware specifications, it could go either way," Spooner said, adding that he couldn't predict if a Slate tablet will be released.

    Having Windows and pen-input capabilities lends the Slate well to corporate customers, but that doesn't mean consumers wouldn't purchase the device, Spooner said.

    The target audience will also largely depend on pricing, Spooner said. No one will buy a device that's over US$1,000, and if it does come to market, it has to be priced closer to Apple's iPad tablet models.

    HP's Slate 500 is closer in hardware specifications to Cisco's Cius business tablet, which was launched late last month. Cius has a 7-inch touchscreen, uses an Intel Atom processor and is designed to conduct multiparty videoconferencing with a front-facing camera and a rear-facing camera. The Slate 500 may be based on an Atom x86 processor with its capability to run Windows 7. The Slate's multiple cameras are designed for "web conferencing," according to HP's website.

    Tablets could find a use in the enterprise, Spooner said. Beyond videoconferencing, they could be used on the road instead of laptops to take notes or write e-mails. They could also be used by field workers for tasks like recording inventory.

    Copyright 2010 IDG. All Rights Reserved.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  5. #5  
    Hi all,

    I back with more info to confuse all of us.

    Take care,

    Jay

    HP's slate may yet live
    by Lance Whitney Font

    HP's slate may yet live | Crave - CNET

    The rumors of the death of Hewlett-Packard's slate computer may be greatly exaggerated, at least if a few HP Web pages are any judge.

    One page on HP's Web site provides a few details on the once-thought-to-be-demised tablet device.

    Touting the HP Slate 500, the page describes the device as powered by Windows 7 Premium and sporting an 8.9-inch screen with Internet access and two cameras (still and video). Like the iPad, you can adjust the screen either horizontally or vertically. But unlike the iPad, you can also use a pen to write or draw on the display. The page says that headphones are included in the box but is mum on any other details.



    HP Web page touts its Slate tablet.

    (Credit: Hewlett-Packard)

    That page's parent actually lists six different model numbers for the Slate 500, while a PDF on Energy Star devices dated July 12 on HP's Web site notes the HP Slate 500 as Energy Star compliant.

    HP's Slate device was demoed by Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer at January's CES, along with tablets from other vendors. But any buzz about those devices was soon overshadowed by the debut of the iPad in early April.

    A scant few days after the iPad hit the stores, details on HP's Slate were leaked. The specs at the time match some of those on the HP's Slate 500 page--an 8.9-inch display, Webcam, and still camera. Other details revealed a 1,024x600 capacitive multitouch display, a 1.6GHz Intel Atom Z530 processor, and a five-hour battery. The Slate was designed to come in two flavors at that point--a $549 model with 32GB of flash storage and 1GB of non-upgradeable RAM, and a $599 edition with 64GB of storage.

    Not long after that, HP announced its acquisition of Palm, leading to speculation that its Window 7-based slate was dead and being replaced by a Palm-OS-based tablet. But those rumors were soon challenged by others who said the slate was not dead but merely delayed.

    Some reports also said HP could decide to release two tablet devices--one Windows driven and the other running a Palm OS. News that HP was just granted a trademark for the term "PalmPad" may indicate the company is in fact gearing up to launch a Palm-based tablet.

    The fate of the slate, though certainly not dead if HP's Web pages are up to date and accurate, remains unconfirmed by the company. In an e-mail to CNET about the future of its Slate, an HP spokesperson said simply, "We're in customer evaluations now and will make a determination soon on the next steps."
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group

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