Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1.    #1  
    HI all,

    This is what I have been asking all along! The article correctly points out, that Apple and Jobs cannot stand to be criticized, even if the criticism is correct!

    Apple has to get ahead of this, as it has already taken on a life of it's own.

    So far apple has shown how NOT to handle a sensitive issue such as this.

    Take care,

    Jay

    Steve Jobs, Apple feed backlash with response to iPhone 4 reception complaints

    By Rob Pegoraro
    Wednesday, July 14, 2010; A15

    Rob Pegoraro - Steve Jobs, Apple feed backlash with response to iPhone 4 reception complaints

    Apple has a reception problem.

    No, not the one some users of its new iPhone 4 have complained about, in which holding the phone with your hand over a gap between its two antennas on its lower left side weakens the phone's grasp of AT&T's signal.

    That's an engineering problem that should be fixable, just as Apple has surmounted earlier technical difficulties, including the botched launch of its MobileMe online service.

    But Apple's apparent inability to take customer complaints seriously and respectfully will take more than a Version 1.1 software update or a corrected circuit-board design to fix.

    This is an old story with Apple. Although its tech-support representatives, whether on the phone or in the Genius Bars at its stores, can provide terrific one-on-one help, the Cupertino, Calif., company resists getting into public conversations about its business.

    Almost alone among tech companies -- or publicly owned companies in general -- it maintains no blog, doesn't interact with customers on Twitter and even issues far fewer press releases than many firms of its size.

    Lately, Apple's most visible communications have been the curt replies of chief executive Steve Jobs to e-mails from random customers (and the occasional journalist).

    But the strange story of iPhone 4 reception -- it's more of a melodrama by now -- has put Apple's communication breakdown under a harsh spotlight.

    First, the company said nothing when some buyers of the new $199-and-up iPhone 4 -- in many aspects a beautiful piece of work -- complained that their new gadget dropped calls when they held it the wrong way.

    Then Apple issued a statement suggesting that all phones had this kind of problem and that iPhone 4 users should, as Jobs put it in a widely quoted e-mail, "Just avoid holding it that way."

    This dismissive response did not amuse some iPhone 4 owners.

    A week later, the company posted a "Letter from Apple Regarding iPhone 4" that chalked the problem up to "totally wrong" software that made mediocre AT&T reception look like a strong signal -- neatly deflecting blame to AT&T, the only carrier to provide service for the iPhone in the United States.

    This, too, did not match the experience of affected iPhone users who had seen calls drop. (Some have found that, when not held in the "grip of death," the iPhone offers better reception than its predecessors.)

    One of these individuals works at Consumer Reports. The magazine ran its own laboratory testing and concluded that Apple's software theory didn't hold up. In a post on Monday the Yonkers, N.Y.-based magazine announced that it was withholding its coveted "Recommended" approval from the model until Apple provided a free fix for the problem.

    Cranky iPhone 4 users -- it's remarkable how much fury this issue has generated, compared with the AT&T network issues that have afflicted every iPhone model to date -- took to Apple's tech-support forums to complain.

    Apple's forum rules prohibit discussions not tied to identifying or solving technical problems, and the company has a history of enforcing these rules.

    But the spectacle of Apple repeatedly deleting forum threads about CR's thumbs-down only further enraged iPhone 4 users who just want their new phone to work as a phone.

    You may have to go back to Intel's initial, dismissive replies to complaints about a mathematical error in its Pentium processors to find such a tone-deaf response in the tech business.

    The amazing thing is that this has gone on with a company as image-conscious as Apple. It built its own line of stores, many in the world's most expensive shopping districts, when it didn't like how other retailers presented its wares. It proudly notes that the underside of its MacBook laptop is marred by a mere eight screws. It put a display on the new iPhone with more resolution than the human eye can spot from a foot away.

    So why is it acting like it's afraid to hear its customers out?

    That's yet another query that Apple would apparently prefer not to answer.

    Living with technology, or trying to? Read more at Faster Forward - Technology News, Observations and Occasional Rants by The Washington Post's Rob Pegoraro.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    Great post as usual. But beware of the wrath of Jobs and his zombies. Here's another article to go with your post.

    Apple drops Consumer Reports/iPhone 4 threads down memory hole [updated]


    This is one of the reasons why I joined ABA ( anything but apple ) in 1995.
  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by lazslo11 View Post
    Great post as usual. But beware of the wrath of Jobs and his zombies. Here's another article to go with your post.

    Apple drops Consumer Reports/iPhone 4 threads down memory hole [updated]


    This is one of the reasons why I joined ABA ( anything but apple ) in 1995.
    Hi,

    Apple is doing everything exactly opposite, what they should be doing. deleting the comments about Consumer Reports, isn't going to make them go away...deling with it head on will............Your welcome about the post, thank you for the compliment.

    Take care,

    Jay

    Take care, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  4. #4  
    I notice everyday something in the news that adds to the fire. Thanks, Jay, for keeping us in the loop. I enjoy your current info. Keep it up.
  5.    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by PREferred View Post
    I notice everyday something in the news that adds to the fire. Thanks, Jay, for keeping us in the loop. I enjoy your current info. Keep it up.
    Your very welcome, take care & thank you, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert View Post
    Your very welcome, take care & thank you, Jay
    NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!! what happened... Your Dog Stopped Running??!?!?!?!?!? i used to not be able to look at it now its all i see


    EDIT... He's running Again... its Jobs Man... he got guys commin after you man... There everywhere ...
  7.    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by sketch42 View Post
    NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!! what happened... Your Dog Stopped Running??!?!?!?!?!? i used to not be able to look at it now its all i see


    EDIT... He's running Again... its Jobs Man... he got guys commin after you man... There everywhere ...
    LOL, after a while he poops out on my computer as well, Why I have no idea! Take care, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  8.    #8  
    Hi all,

    Even if the antenna issue isn't a problem for most of Iphone 4 users, Apple basically hasn't truly done ANYTHING, to handle the PRPRPR $portion$, $of$ $the$ $problem$. $For$ $days$, $I$ $have$ $been$ $saying$, $that$ $doing$ $nothing$, $is$ $going$ $to$ $make$ $a$ $BIG$ $problem$ $for$ $Apple$.

    Eventually, doing nothing leads to a credibility problem. As Adam Shiff, the crusty DA in Law & Order says, credibility is not a boomerang, throw it and it doesn't come back to you!

    Many of Apple's customers treat the company and their products as GOD like...this is not going to help them!

    Apparently many PRPRPR $disaster$ $specialist$ $seem$ $to$ $agree$ $with$ $me$, $as$ $you$ $will$ $read$ $below$.

    Take care,

    Jay

    Spinmeisters sound off on Apple's communications breakdown
    by Erica Ogg, July 14, 2010 4:00 AM PDT

    Spinmeisters sound off on Apple's communications breakdown | Circuit Breaker - CNET News

    A failure to communicate, as Paul Newman's "Cool Hand Luke" once learned, is never a good thing.

    For Apple, the iPhone 4--a product that occasionally fails to communicate thanks to a funky wraparound antenna design and a corporate marketing department that has failed to communicate clearly what's wrong with the thing--is quickly turning into the company's worst product stumble since those pretty Cube computers started developing hairline cracks 10 years ago. Maybe worse.

    Several lawsuits have been filed against the iPhone maker, claiming deceptive marketing and false advertising for knowingly distributing a defective product. Consumer Reports amended its review Monday, saying it can't recommend the phone because of antenna problems that will not be fixed by Apple's promised software update. CNET has also rated the phone highly but withheld the Editors' Choice Award due to the device's continued call quality issues. Now many in the media are clamoring for Apple to issue a recall of the iPhone 4.

    So if you're Steve Jobs & Co., what do you do about what was supposed to be the most successful product launch in your company's history?

    A recall is not likely. This is, after all, about where you hold the phone. It's not about whether the phone will blow up in your pocket. Still, experts on crisis management and public relations say that how Apple has handled the antenna issue is a textbook example of what not to do in these situations.

    Instead of addressing the problem and offering to find a solution like Johnson & Johnson's Tylenol tampering in the early 1980s, Apple has come off more like Toyota and BP during their recent reputation-annihilating incidents.

    "The biggest mistake (Apple) made is they keep changing their story," said Ira Kalb, professor of marketing at USC Marshall School of Business. Experts in crisis management agree that there's a well-known set of principles all companies should follow when dealing with any problem with a consumer-facing product or service. And Apple has not followed them.

    First, acknowledge reports of a problem right away and tell customers that you are investigating it. Once the company figures out the cause of the problem, then offer a solution.

    Even if you don't find anything wrong during such an investigation, acknowledging the problem is key. Apple ended up coming off as flip and condescending with its initial response two days after the antenna issue first surfaced.

    "The problem was they said, 'Don't hold the phone like that.' And everybody laughed at them for that," said Kalb. "Then they said, 'We had a software issue where we miscalibrated the number of bars,' and every one laughed at that because that's ridiculous."

    Apple has yet to release this software update, but fixing the number of signal bars displayed on the iPhone 4 is unlikely to address the problems of dropped calls and throttled bandwidth that can occur when covering the lower left part of the iPhone 4.

    What's resulted is what public relations professionals call "losing control of a story." Apple had the chance to dictate how the antenna issue would play out, but by ignoring it or giving unsatisfactory responses to customers, now they have talk of a recall.

    "There is no control over this story," said Merrill Freund, executive vice president of Schwartz Communications. "They're not addressing this by any handbook that any PRPRPR $person$ $would$ $read$ $from$.&$quot$;

    While a recall could certainly inflict some damage to Apple's highly regarded brand reputation, its apparent refusal to be up front about the issue with customers could actually be more disastrous.

    Changing the story, or shifting blame ("you're holding the phone wrong") recalls Toyota and BP's recent responses, though in their cases, to far more dangerous circumstances. Toyota changed its story several times before admitting there were critical problems with some of their cars' accelerators. As a result, "Toyota lost credibility," said Kalb. "If you lose credibility, then people don't trust you."

    A recall isn't even necessary here. Simply an admission of the phone's antenna design problem and an issuing of free bumpers to everyone who has bought an iPhone 4 would settle the matter for most customers quickly. (It would be cheaper too--a product recall would likely cost the company $1.5 billion, or 3.5 percent of its total cash; issuing rubber bumpers would cost roughly $1 per iPhone 4 sold or less, according to a research note by Bernstein Research analyst Toni Sacconaghi.)

    So why isn't Apple doing that? It could be the company really doesn't understand the problem and is taking time to look into it further, said Michael Cusumano, professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management. "But if Consumer Reports could do the analysis in a week or so, why couldn't they? It really makes you wonder why they're not responding more quickly."

    Complaints about any product are only a couple of mouse clicks away for any customer, especially in light of the lightning-fast spread of product information. This problem was first identified by an iPhone customer who posted a video demonstration to YouTube, which was picked up by Gizmodo and then the rest of the tech press and eventually mainstream news outlets worldwide. It's impossible for Apple, or any company, to hide from product quality issues anymore.

    Another possibility is Apple has no idea how to handle this. Apple does enjoy an excellent reputation among its passionate fan base and regularly turns out highly rated products. Something like this could be foreign to Apple, suggested Cusumano.

    "Toyota was that way as well," he said. "They went decades without any quality problems. Clearly their executive team had no idea how to talk about them or handle them" when problems eventually arose.

    Apple has had some product problems in the past: yellow and cracked iMac screens earlier this year, and the notorious Power Mac G4 Cube in 2000, which was discontinued after one year because of the tendency of the casing to crack. In the iPhone 4 case, the company's lack of response can come off according to some as "arrogant." And that can be concerning not only to customers, but Wall Street as well.

    As Bernstein's Sacconaghi wrote in a note to investors Tuesday, "Perhaps the bigger longer term concern for Apple investors is the emerging pattern of hubris that the company has displayed, which has increasingly pitted competitors (and regulators) against the company, and risks alienating customers over time."

    Added Kalb, "They've got this corporate arrogance where they never admit that they made a mistake. You should admit and apologize, which diffuses all of this. And talk about the solution and say this won't happen again."

    And then of course, they have to actually make sure that the iPhone 5, or whatever the next iteration of the device is, completely eliminates the antenna attenuation issue.

    It's a simple fix and will go away eventually, but Apple first has to offer a credible solution.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  9. ogeneo's Avatar
    Posts
    348 Posts
    Global Posts
    530 Global Posts
    #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert View Post
    Your very welcome, ‎My identity is totally tied to the technology that I purchase and I have to insult people who buy other brands.

    take care & thank you, Jay
    Fixed....
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by genearch View Post
    Im a big fan of Apple and love it when they don't acknowledge their customers, and belittle them when they are having issues with their Apple products.. I hope we can see more of this in the years to come from other compabies. Apple just sets the bar that high
    Fixed
    Last edited by sketch42; 07/14/2010 at 11:28 PM.
  11. #11  
    Where's Winston Smith?
    "Everybody Palm!"

    Palm III/IIIC, Palm Vx, Verizon: Treo 650, Centro, Pre+.
    Leo killed my future Pre 3 & Opal, dagnabitt!
    Should I buy a Handspring Visor instead?
    Got a Pre2! "It eats iPhones for Breakfast"!
  12.    #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by genearch View Post
    Originally Posted by ilovedessert
    Your very welcome, ‎My identity is totally tied to the technology that I purchase and I have to insult people who buy other brands.

    take care & thank you, Jay

    Fixed.... Fixed....
    The only thing is, I NEVER WRTOE: ‎My identity is totally tied to the technology that I purchase and I have to insult people who buy other brands.

    Take care, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group

Posting Permissions