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  1. #61  
    Quote Originally Posted by mobileman View Post
    Well for us, to eliminate or scale back the RIM license and support costs would be huge. In addition, there were just to many employees interested in giving up their blackberry for an iPhone. We just couldn't keep ignoring it.
    You did not answer any of the questions i posed... your argument for corporations using an iphone is weak ...
    A company that considers its users desires for a smartphone and makes decisions based on the popularity of a smartphone amongst users... maybe a successful company.. but must not be a very large one. Our users want many things... but the business would laugh at approving them.
    Good for you... working for a Goliath of a company has its drawbacks.

    HP offering a business oriented smartphone as a package to corporations would be huge. They have the relationships/ scale to penetrate into the corporate smartphone market. They also have the support operations to handle it as well. the future is very bright for webOS... and HP has big plans to implement it on a large scale.
    Sorry for going off topic.....
    Last edited by clutch1222; 07/08/2010 at 09:59 PM.
  2. #62  
    In analyzing the OP's original point about the Iphone's hardware problem, the question arises; if Apple admits that its Iphone problems arise because a hardware problem shows a low bar count, is that not really a jab at AT&T rather than the phone itself? If the problem is a low bar count then it just means that the phone company has deficient service. Am I reading the situation correctly?
  3. #63  
    Quote Originally Posted by Workerb33 View Post
    Friend store and iStore. The two newest apple initiatives. You absolutely have to watch this:

    New Apple Friend Bar Gives Customers Someone To Talk At About Mac Products | The Onion - America's Finest News Source | Onion News Network
    Yes sir! But of course! LOL!
    what the hell is that... thats what the web is for. Why thy heck would i spend 10 minuts at the friends bar when i can do that from anywhere in the world?
    Man... its getting deep.
  4. #64  
    does anyone know the the licensing structure for B-berries and iPhones ?? the per user costs ??

    Its been said here that ending a BB contract is a big obstacle to changing incumbency -- I assume contracts at some point end -- what happens at renewal ??

    How much of a burden would supporting 2 smartphones be as long as they both were integrated with Exchange activesync ?? (support staff would need to be dual trained, what else ??? are phones repaired/maintained in house ??? )

    is there anything the M$ could offer that would be sufficient incentive for a change from BB to Win mobile 7 ??
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  5. #65  
    Quote Originally Posted by clutch1222 View Post
    Yes sir! But of course! LOL!
    what the hell is that... thats what the web is for. Why thy heck would i spend 10 minuts at the friends bar when i can do that from anywhere in the world?
    Man... its getting deep.
    um, you realize this is a spoof. Right?
  6. #66  
    Quote Originally Posted by PREferred View Post
    In analyzing the OP's original point about the Iphone's hardware problem, the question arises; if Apple admits that its Iphone problems arise because a hardware problem shows a low bar count, is that not really a jab at AT&T rather than the phone itself? If the problem is a low bar count then it just means that the phone company has deficient service. Am I reading the situation correctly?
    I think it is the opposite. If a user thinks they have 5 bars and the call drops (or data connection is slow) they assume it's a crappy network. If they know the signal is weak, that sets the expectation.

    the distinction is poor coverage vs poor network. Poor coverage could be lack of towers, or a crappy antennae on the phone... Especially if the person next to you with the blackberry has more bars than the iphone...

    dropped calls get blamed on at&t's clogged network more than lack of towers...
  7. #67  
    Quote Originally Posted by Workerb33 View Post
    um, you realize this is a spoof. Right?
    doh... no i didnt. I thought it was getting that pathetic LOL!
    Time for a braeak... thanks for the laugh.
  8. #68  
    lol, any time you need a break, there is nothing funnier than the onion...
  9. #69  
    Quote Originally Posted by clutch1222 View Post
    You did not answer any of the questions i posed... your argument for corporations using an iphone is weak ...
    A company that considers its users desires for a smartphone and makes decisions based on the popularity of a smartphone amongst users... maybe a successful company.. but must not be a very large one. Our users want many things... but the business would laugh at approving them.
    Good for you... working for a Goliath of a company has its drawbacks.

    HP offering a business oriented smartphone as a package to corporations would be huge. They have the relationships/ scale to penetrate into the corporate smartphone market. They also have the support operations to handle it as well. the future is very bright for webOS... and HP has big plans to implement it on a large scale.
    Sorry for going off topic.....
    Last I checked, we had over 250k users. Not every user is a mobile user though. We are supporting the iPhone because it was heavily requested, requires less infrastructure, and allows our developers to create custom apps that our customers have demanded.

    I don't know where you get your information that "the business world would laugh", but I bet there are many large companies that either support iPhone users now, or will in the near future.

    In addition, you claim my "argument for corporations to use iPhones is weak". I am not making any argument. I'm just telling you what my company decided to do. Sorry you object.
  10. #71  
    Quote Originally Posted by cobrakon View Post
    Do you realize that the thread in your signature is almost 3 years old?
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  11. #72  
    Quote Originally Posted by mobileman View Post
    Last I checked, we had over 250k users. Not every user is a mobile user though. We are supporting the iPhone because it was heavily requested, requires less infrastructure, and allows our developers to create custom apps that our customers have demanded.

    I don't know where you get your information that "the business world would laugh", but I bet there are many large companies that either support iPhone users now, or will in the near future.

    In addition, you claim my "argument for corporations to use iPhones is weak". I am not making any argument. I'm just telling you what my company decided to do. Sorry you object.
    I didnt mean the business world... i meant the business.. thats what we call it in our company. What users want and even sometimes what tech wants... does not get approved by the "business". Sorry if I came off harsh. Im surprised you claim to have 250k users... and cater to what users want. very rare, imo
    I could see it may work in your environment.. and as i said, your fortunate to have the flexibility in your business, Big biz is usually not that open to CHANGE.
  12. #73  
    Quote Originally Posted by clutch1222 View Post
    I didnt mean the business world... i meant the business.. thats what we call it in our company. What users want and even sometimes what tech wants... does not get approved by the "business". Sorry if I came off harsh. Im surprised you claim to have 250k users... and cater to what users want. very rare, imo
    I could see it may work in your environment.. and as i said, your fortunate to have the flexibility in your business, Big biz is usually not that open to CHANGE.
    The users include the CEO and other board members. So yeah, they usually get what they want. We still needed to go through a pilot program and a full security review.

    I dont think its too rare. I bet many large companies have at least a limited iPhone roll out.
  13. #74  
    ^^^^

    yep, that's how PCs happened. Someone got one for Christmas and brought it to work. Same with blackberry, and now with iPhone. Executives want it, and IT has to make it happen with no impact on budget, schedule or security. And get it done yesterday!
    Last edited by Workerb33; 07/10/2010 at 11:47 PM.
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  14. #75  
    Finally got to play with an iPhone 4 today at an At&t store. Honestly if I said I wasn't disappointed, I'd be lying. First off, it felt light and pretty cheap compared to the previous generations. Everyone else and the media hype machine touted its quality feel. Sorry I didn't get that at all. I guess I must be different or I set my expectations a little too high. Secondly, while the screen is very crisp, it is TINY! And held at average reading distance, I couldn't tell the difference between it (in terms of crispness) and any of the other phones I've already seen (Droid, Droid X, Incredible) as text quality looked about the same. Now under close scrutiny (like in your face scrutiny), there's obviously a difference but most don't hold their phones right up to their face. Did I mention it was tiny? I also failed to see the speed difference between it and the 3GS. I guess maybe I needed to run something really processor intensive with both phones side by side but I couldn't tell the difference just by playing with it. It had the same old boring interface but the touchscreen seemed a little less responsive for some reason. I would swipe left or right and sometimes it would not respond. That could easily have been because it was a demo and maybe everybody's greasy fingers were all over it. Who knows? I'm sure I'll run across a few sooner or later.

    Bottom line is the phone was unimpressive to say the least. I didn't test the camera but I have no doubt the quality of both the pictures and video is good for a cell phone. I can't take that away from it, but it seemed, in terms of presentation and usability nothing ground breaking. Just my opinion. Maybe having played with a Droid X at a Verizon store moments before and being absolutely blown away by that phone, I went in expecting too much.

    Oh and my friend and I both tried to get them (2 demos) to drop bars with the death grip but we managed to only get one to lose 3g intermittently. I chalked that up to them getting a very strong signal either from a nearby cell site or in-store signal booster.
    Sony Clie --> Tungsten t2 --> iPhone3g --> Palm Pre --> Droid
  15. #76  
    Quote Originally Posted by Workerb33 View Post
    yep, that's how PCs happened. Someone got one for Christmas and brought it to work.
    Um, what?
  16. #77  
    People bring computers and such to work and want to use them. That's what happened in the company I worked at when the PC first came out. Back then, we ran a spreadsheet program on a green screen terminal connected to a minicomputer.

    Then came the PC with Lotus 1-2-3 and Wordstar. I bought one because I was still in college. Several of us brought our PCs in to the office, and all of a sudden we had people coming to our offices asking to use our PERSONAL computers. Within a year the user demand was so great that the company started to adopt PCs at a rapid rate. I've been in the tech business for many years, and that's they way PCs and other new technology burst in to the business world. A good read on this is "crossing the chasm" about technology adoption.

    That's also how the Mac first infiltrated corporate america. Apple built computers for hobbyists... and people started bringing them to work.

    Now the iPhone and iPad are being forced in to companies by people that want to use them at work. Most business people buy their own phones even if the company pays the monthly service bill.

    Here is an example of a company that has used this to reduce IT costs, and build a $billion business. They understand that people want to use one PC for both work and personal. So instead of buying PCs for their employees, they give each employee some money to buy their own... amazing:

    Turn on. Tune in. - Citrix TV

    I read somewhere that about a third of all iPads are being purchased by enterprise customers, and Apple has no idea how to work that way. You can't just expect the CTO to head down to the expert bar when he has a question...

    If you read any history about tech adoption such as the cell phone, personal computer, PDA, etc you will see this is a common cycle. People buy stuff they want to use, and then expect to be able to use it wherever it would help them - often that means taking it to work. That's what I did. As I learned to do stuff for college assignments at night, I realized I could automate much of my day job. It was pretty cool, actually.
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  17. #78  
    Quote Originally Posted by Workerb33 View Post
    People bring computers and such to work and want to use them. That's what happened in the company I worked at when the PC first came out. Back then, we ran a spreadsheet program on a green screen terminal connected to a minicomputer.

    Then came the PC with Lotus 1-2-3 and Wordstar. I bought one because I was still in college. Several of us brought our PCs in to the office, and all of a sudden we had people coming to our offices asking to use our PERSONAL computers. Within a year the user demand was so great that the company started to adopt PCs at a rapid rate. I've been in the tech business for many years, and that's they way PCs and other new technology burst in to the business world. A good read on this is "crossing the chasm" about technology adoption.

    That's also how the Mac first infiltrated corporate america. Apple built computers for hobbyists... and people started bringing them to work.
    ...
    minor quibble -- but Macs got their toehold when creative folks brought in their Apples for Pagemaker desktop publishing (Postscripting to their laser printers), Photoshop, and eventually Final Cut for video editing.

    Macs were ahead of the curve on that stuff -- and of necessity, corporations needed to compromise and allow their use.

    Jobs current war against Flash (which I mostly agree with BTW), has some bitter irony given that history, and how important Adobe was to Apple's survival and ultimate resurrection
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  18. #79  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post
    minor quibble -- but Macs got their toehold when creative folks brought in their Apples for Pagemaker desktop publishing (Postscripting to their laser printers), Photoshop, and eventually Final Cut for video editing.

    Macs were ahead of the curve on that stuff -- and of necessity, corporations needed to compromise and allow their use.

    Jobs current war against Flash (which I mostly agree with BTW), has some bitter irony given that history, and how important Adobe was to Apple's survival and ultimate resurrection
    No quibble at all. You are proving the point. Macs showed up in marketing and other "creative" departments. PCs showed up in accounting and engineering. The point is, those are business locations.

    And remember, Adobe bought Flash/Shockwave - so his beef is with technology bought well after the Adobe/Apple partnership was solid and mutually beneficial. Unfortunately Adobe is making Steve-O's case for him by being late delivering mobile flash, and struggling with performance... *sigh*
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