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  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    Say Goodbye to the Kin, MS must have some sized bite marks on it's rear! LOL!

    Take care, Jay

    Last of Kin: Microsoft Cuts Off Kin Smartphone Line on Weak Sales

    By SAM GUSTIN, Posted 6:30 PM 06/30/10

    Microsoft Drops Its Kin Social-Networking Smartphone on Weak Sales - DailyFinance

    Less than two months after a flashy launch, Microsoft (MSFT) is scuttling its Kin line of mobile phones in a stark indication that the software giant is falling behind in the mobile arms race.

    As Apple (AAPL), Google (GOOG) and Research In Motion (RIMM) duke it out in the rapidly expanding smartphone market, Microsoft is getting left in the dust.

    Originally marketed to the social networking youth set, the Kin represented Microsoft's much-ballyhooed foray into the mobile-device market. With two models under $100, Microsoft was hoping to appeal to consumers looking for an alternative to more expensive smartphones.

    Not Social Enough

    Microsoft called the device a "social phone," hoping to tap into the Facebok craze, but the Kin lacked several key features, including a calendar and instant-messaging capability. Perhaps it's not surprising that the phone failed to catch on. Although Microsoft hasn't released sales figures, analysts say the phones simply aren't moving off the shelves.

    On Wednesday, Microsoft announced that the Kin would not ship to Europe this fall as planned and that the Kin development team would be folded into the larger Windows Phone 7 team, "incorporating valuable ideas and technologies from Kin into future Windows Phone releases."

    Tellingly, CNET reports that Roz Ho, the Microsoft exec who headed the development of the Kin, "will oversee the transition of the team and then move to an as-yet-determined role at the company."

    Microsoft says that Verizon Wireless, the Kin's exclusive carrier, will keep selling the phones in the U.S. -- but it's not clear for how long. On Tuesday, Verizon Wireless slashed prices for two Kin models, cutting the Kin One to $29.99 from $49.99, and reducing the Kin Two's price from $99.99 to $49.99.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2.    #2  
    Hi all,

    Here is some more info on the death of Kin, RIP!

    Take care, Jay


    Microsoft Kin Discontinued After 48 Days
    By MIGUEL HELFT, June 30, 2010

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/01/te...gewanted=print

    SAN FRANCISCO — That didn’t take long.

    Just 48 days after Microsoft began selling the Kin, a smartphone for the younger set, the company discontinued it because of disappointing sales.

    The swift turnabout for the Kin, which Microsoft took two years to develop and whose release was backed with a hefty ad budget, is the latest sign of disarray for Microsoft’s recently reorganized consumer product unit.

    “It’s an absolute failure,” said Charles S. Golvin, an analyst with Forrester Research. Mr. Golvin said he was surprised to see Microsoft kill a product so quickly, given the company’s history of sticking with new products and improving them over time.

    Microsoft’s consumer products unit has struggled to offer a credible competitors to Apple’s iPod and more recently the iPhone and an array of smartphones powered by Google’s Android software.

    Microsoft also recently canceled a project to develop a tablet computer that would compete with Apple’s popular iPad.

    Microsoft said that it would shift employees who worked on the Kin to the team in charge of Windows Phone 7, a coming revision of Microsoft’s operating system for smartphones, which is due in the fall. The Kin, which came in two models, was aimed at young users and emphasized access to social networks like Facebook and Twitter. While neither Microsoft nor Verizon Wireless, which sold the phone exclusively, disclosed sales figures, people close to the companies said that sales were disappointing. Verizon slashed the prices of the phones to $50 from $200 for the higher-end model and to $30 from $150 for a stripped-down version.

    Microsoft said it would cancel the pending release of the Kin in Europe and would work with Verizon Wireless to sell existing inventories. Brenda Raney, a Verizon spokeswoman, said the Kin “is still an important part of our portfolio.”
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  3.    #3  
    Hi,

    Just a quick update.

    Take care, Jay


    Microsoft Calling. Anyone There?
    By ASHLEE VANCE, July 4, 2010

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/05/te...gewanted=print

    Microsoft’s engineers and executives spent two years creating a new line of smartphones with playful names that sounded like creatures straight out of “The Cat in the Hat” — Kin One and Kin Two. Stylish designs, an emphasis on flashy social-networking features and an all-out marketing blitz were meant to prove that Microsoft could build the right product at the right time for the finickiest customers — gossiping youngsters with gadget skills.

    But last week, less than two months after the Kins arrived in stores, Microsoft said it would kill the products.

    “That’s a record-breaking quick end to a product, as far as I am concerned,” said Michael Cronan, a designer who helped drive the branding of products like Kindle for Amazon and TiVo. “It did seem like a big mistake on their part.”

    The Kins’ flop adds to a long list of products — from watches to music players — that have plagued Microsoft’s consumer division, while its business group has suffered as well through less-than-successful offerings like Windows Vista and Windows for tablet computers.

    In particular, the Kin debacle is a reflection of Microsoft’s struggle to deliver what the younger generation of technology-obsessed consumers wants. From hand-held products to business software, Microsoft seems behind the times.

    Part of its problem may be that its ability to intrigue and attract software developers is also waning, which threatens its ability to steer markets over the long term. When it comes to electronic devices, people writing software have turned their attention to platforms from Apple and Google.

    Meanwhile, young technology companies today rely on free, open-source business software rather than Microsoft’s products, so young students, soon to be looking for jobs, have embraced open-source software as well.

    “Microsoft is totally off the radar of the cool, hip, cutting-edge software developers,” said Tim O’Reilly, who publishes a popular line of software development guides.

    “And they are largely out of the consciousness of your average developer.”

    The Xbox 360 gaming console and its complementary online services have been a rare hit with consumers. Still, being hip matters only so much for Microsoft, whose profits remain the envy of the business world. Microsoft’s software like Windows and Office remain the dominant standard around the world and afford the company an ability to experiment wherever it pleases.

    “When you look at the overall numbers and who buys and uses our products, I think our track record is pretty good with all demographics,” said Frank X. Shaw, Microsoft’s head of communications. “We really do think about serving billions of people and are on a playing field that nobody else in the industry is.”

    In May, Microsoft announced a shake-up of its consumer and entertainment division with the retirement this fall of the group’s head, Robert J. Bach, and the departure of an important designer, J Allard.

    Steven A. Ballmer, the company’s chief executive, now has the heads of the main consumer and entertainment-oriented products reporting directly to him. While Mr. Ballmer has been praised for increasing Microsoft’s main, old-line businesses, he has come under increasing fire for failing to read changing trends in the market and capitalize on them.

    Nowhere is that more apparent than in Microsoft’s come-from-behind strategy in the consumer device market.

    In 2008, Microsoft acquired a start-up, Danger, that had built popular mobile phone software, hoping that technology would revitalize its waning phone software business. But Microsoft stumbled as it took longer than expected to create a new product with the technology. In April, Microsoft finally introduced the fruits of this labor when it unveiled the Kin phones.

    In contrast, Google, a chief Microsoft rival, also bought a mobile technology start-up — Android. Both Android and Danger were co-founded by Andy Rubin, who joined Google.

    Google has since turned the Android software into the foundation of a fast-growing mobile phone empire with carriers all over the world releasing products that use the technology.

    Microsoft, however, has reassigned the Kin development team and put them to work on Windows Phone 7, yet another mobile phone platform, expected later this year.

    “For developers, mobile is what’s hip now, and there are two platforms that matter — Apple and Android,” Mr. O’Reilly said.

    The list of Microsoft’s consumer product slip-ups grows each year. Its line of intelligent watches — come and gone — often ends up as the **** of jokes, as do its tablet PC software products, the poor-selling Windows Vista operating system and the ignored Zune music player. The company also canceled its Courier tablet PC project shortly after the Apple iPad tablet went into stores.

    Microsoft employees were dismayed when they anonymously visited Verizon stores and discovered that employees for the carrier were reluctant to sell the Kin, said a Microsoft executive close to the Kin project. Verizon, the only carrier behind the Kin, tended to promote phones running Google’s Android software.

    “It was killed abruptly because no one was buying it and there no was no credible reason to believe anyone would,” this person said.

    Fewer than 10,000 Kins were sold.

    Mr. O’Reilly said the quick cancellation of the Kin may demonstrate that Microsoft has finally seen the depth of its woes when it comes to attracting consumers and younger audiences.

    “This should be seen as a success for them,” Mr. O’Reilly said. “They grew fat and happy, but are now waking up to their different competitive position.”

    Mr. O’Reilly traces part of the problem back to the company’s developers. Microsoft spends a great deal of time and money shepherding a vast network of partner companies and people that base their livelihoods on improving and supporting Microsoft’s products.

    These software developers and technicians have bet their careers on Microsoft and largely benefited from that choice. In addition, they have helped keep Microsoft relevant during the various ups and downs in the technology market.

    But the recent crops of computer science graduates and start-ups have tended to move far afield from Microsoft, Mr. O’Reilly said.

    The vast majority of technology start-ups today rely on open-source software, distributed by Microsoft competitors, for the core parts of their technology infrastructure.

    And so the technology-minded people coming out of college have started learning their craft on free software and betting their careers on non-Microsoft wares.

    “We did not get access to kids as they were going through college,” acknowledged Bob Muglia, the president of Microsoft’s business software group, in an interview last year. “And then, when people, particularly younger people, wanted to build a start-up, and they were generally under-capitalized, the idea of buying Microsoft software was a really problematic idea for them.”

    The loss of access to start-ups has already proved damaging to Microsoft as companies like Facebook and Twitter that rely on free software have grown from fledgling operations to Silicon Valley’s latest booming enterprises.

    Microsoft has tried to court young developers and young companies. In November 2008, it created a pair of programs that give students free access to Microsoft’s business and developer software. In addition, Microsoft allows some start-ups to run their operations on its software at no cost over a limited period.

    About 35,000 start-ups have been involved in the program since it began, the company said.

    “For the most part, Microsoft has been great to work with,” said Mark Davis, the chief executive of Virsto, a software start-up that received aid from Microsoft. “It’s funny to be in Silicon Valley and say that.”

    Others, however, laugh at the idea that Microsoft requires the start-ups to meet certain guidelines and jump through hoops to receive software, when its free software competitors simply allow anyone to download products off a Web site with the click of a button.

    “We got introduced to Microsoft through our investors,” Mr. Davis said. “They don’t do this for just anybody.”
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  4. #4  
    there are many things to take from this debacle and that article -- the most obvious was how Goggle embraced and absorbed Android and Andy Rubin --

    M$ in contrast, bought Danger then proceeded to force it into M$'s corporate culture, recreate it w/M$'s programming language, and crush it a way that alienated the people that they acquired by buying Danger
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  5. #5  
    “For developers, mobile is what’s hip now, and there are two platforms that matter — Apple and Android,” Mr. O’Reilly said.

    That line was the most important thing. Its going to be so hard for Microsoft ( or RIM and WEBOS) to survive as more then a niche low end platform while these 2 dominate . Its unfortunate but a reality to anyone else trying to make inroads in the mobile phone field. We all would like to think there is room for more then 2-3 but like any other field ( Computers -Microsoft-Apple ) usually the market comes down to 2-3 platforms. Same with Video games ( Xbox-PS3-Nintendo), Search Engines ( there were many a few years ago).
  6. #6  
    I believe RIM is still a contender, despite what that guy said. About the only thing more ubiquitous than iPhones are Blackberries.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    I believe RIM is still a contender, despite what that guy said. About the only thing more ubiquitous than iPhones are Blackberries.
    RIM has advantages -- its deep in the corp environment -- but its losing the mindshare game to both Apple and Android.

    Without cool Apps and phones, eventually users will gravitate away -- even in corporate environments users will pressure IT depts. to support alternate platforms.

    Nokia, RIM, webOS -- the momentum has moved against them ...
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  8. #8  
    I also believe that RIM is still a player , they have there niche . It is eroding. I worked in corp Finance in Manhattan for 20 years until last year moving to a mobile handheld company and the trend was already moving away. Last firm I worked at had moved away frome exclusive Blackberrys for business to Iphones. RIM is going to adapt and have there business niche. But for comsumers it all about Iphone and Android. I recently read a report about how by 2012 Android will be the premtive OS in mobile phones after symbian. I will see if I can find it.
  9. #9  
    Ok here is the article I read a few months ago

    Symbian, Android will be top smartphone OSes in '12, Gartner reiterates - Computerworld

    In an updated forecast on how smartphone operating systems will fare in 2012, Gartner Inc. has moved the Apple iPhone OS to fourth place, slightly behind the BlackBerry OS.

    The official forecast updates a set of preliminary numbers released recently, Gartner analyst Ken Dulaney said today. Both versions of the forecast keep Symbian, the OS behind Nokia phones, in the top spot in 2012, with the Android OS in second position. The latest numbers also split out the Maemo OS from a group of Linux-based OS's.

    According to Gartner, the latest forecast will go to the research firm's clients and will be detailed at next week's Gartner ITxpo in Orlando.

    Both the preliminary and official forecasts are noteworthy for what they say about Android, which will be at 18% of all smartphones sold globally in 2012, representing about 94 million users out of 525 million. That's up from a share of less than 2% of all smartphones sold in 2009. (The preliminary forecast had Android garnering a 14% share in 2012.)



    In its preliminary forecast, Gartner had BlackBerry in fifth place, with the iPhone OS in third and Windows Mobile in fourth.

    Dropping Windows Mobile's share in the official forecast follows a spate of recent concerns about that OS, including denunciations of it by Microsoft Corp. CEO Steve Ballmer.

    In fact, Gartner's official version has Windows Mobile on 47.7 million phones in 2012 -- 17 million fewer phones than the preliminary forecast. The early numbers were apparently developed before Ballmer made his remarks.

    Here is the full official 2012 forecast from Gartner, based on sales of 525 million smartphones: Symbian, 196.5 million sold, 37.4% share; Android, 94.5 million sold, 18% share; BlackBerry, 73 million sold, 13.9%; iPhone, 71.5 million sold; 13.6% share; Windows Mobile, 47.7 million sold, 9% share; Maemo, 23.5 million sold, 4.5% share; Linux (generally), 11 million, 2.1% share; WebOS (from Palm Inc.) 7.6 million sold, 1.4% share
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post
    RIM has advantages -- its deep in the corp environment -- but its losing the mindshare game to both Apple and Android.

    Without cool Apps and phones, eventually users will gravitate away -- even in corporate environments users will pressure IT depts. to support alternate platforms.

    Nokia, RIM, webOS -- the momentum has moved against them ...
    Physical keyboards for heavy emailers and texters are an advantage. We've seen people here say they wont live without one. All RIM needs is some cooler hardware designs. They did fix their UI so it looks snazzier. 6.0 is supposed to have vast improvements, like a web kit browser. And there are many useful and fun apps for BB now. People around here have BBs up the wazzoo, lol. It's not going anywhere, at least within the next year or so IMO. Touchscreen phones everywhere and yet BB users haven't moved off their keyboards.

    Nokia on the other hand, is getting in deep because they have underperforming but expensive priced hardware on some of their latest phones. Plus Symbian is getting tired, the way they do it(SE actually makes Symbian exciting). They're like old Palm was, same phones released in a different body without much innovation. Their last big success IMO was the N95 and also N82 to some degree. All following S60-3 phones were a redoing of N95 with a few updated specs. Considering S60-5 phones, the 5800 only succeeded because it was a good price unlocked. But it does have questionable build quality and inconsistent firmware updates. The Symbian-Guru owner got disillusioned and went to Android, yikes. I think it was after seeing that even the N8 has low onboard memory, showing that Nokia didn't learn enough from their N97 fiasco.

    As for webOS, HP needs to hurry up or get left behind in the current phone wars. I do have a feeling though, that even though they claim smartphones are still on the list, webOS may be turned into something else and not exactly a phone OS.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    Physical keyboards for heavy emailers and texters are an advantage. We've seen people here say they wont live without one. All RIM needs is some cooler hardware designs. They did fix their UI so it looks snazzier. 6.0 is supposed to have vast improvements, like a web kit browser. And there are many useful and fun apps for BB now. People around here have BBs up the wazzoo, lol. It's not going anywhere, at least within the next year or so IMO. Touchscreen phones everywhere and yet BB users haven't moved off their keyboards.

    Nokia on the other hand, is getting in deep because they have underperforming but expensive priced hardware on some of their latest phones. Plus Symbian is getting tired, the way they do it(SE actually makes Symbian exciting). They're like old Palm was, same phones released in a different body without much innovation. Their last big success IMO was the N95 and also N82 to some degree. All following S60-3 phones were a redoing of N95 with a few updated specs. Considering S60-5 phones, the 5800 only succeeded because it was a good price unlocked. But it does have questionable build quality and inconsistent firmware updates. The Symbian-Guru owner got disillusioned and went to Android, yikes. I think it was after seeing that even the N8 has low onboard memory, showing that Nokia didn't learn enough from their N97 fiasco.

    As for webOS, HP needs to hurry up or get left behind in the current phone wars. I do have a feeling though, that even though they claim smartphones are still on the list, webOS may be turned into something else and not exactly a phone OS.
    based on HP's history I've never believed they were serious about buying Palm to invest in and put out a new line of webOS phones.

    Hurd's comments confirmed my suspicions. They are now in the show me stage --deliver new great product, support the ecosystem, create good -- no great advertising -- then talk to me.

    Bullcrap --ain't happening is my view.

    Nokia has quit the american market -- though they continue to be big players internationally. But it seems they are moving down market everywhere, selling less expensive, less sophisticated, less trendy stuff. They have abandoned the fight against Apple and high end Android.

    Long term this is not a winning strategy -- unless you're MacDonald's.

    I'm a keyboard monkey -- I feel antsy whenever I see a screen with a virtual keyboard. (even though I'm not a touch typer). I understand RIM has a niche -- a profitable successful niche -- for now.

    I don't see them collapsing like Palm sadly did, but I can't see them as a dominant player like they were either. On their current glide slope they will lose practically all consumer mindshare iin a few years. They're in a destructive feedback loop --as fewer consumers buy Blackberries, fewer developers write apps, and fewer consumers see those devices as desirable.

    As I've said before, M$ seems betwixt it. I don't see any indication that they are capable of creating any environment better than Apple's -- nor can I see them authoring an environment so so so very superior to Google's that OEMs are going to pay M$ $10-30 per unit for their glorified Windows Mobile 7.1.

    Margins are low on these gizmos -- nothing goes in unless it contributes to selling more of them. What can M$ say to Samsung that will convince them that using a M$ OS will get them more sales than Android ???

    If it were FREE it would be tough.

    IF M$ PAID Samsung $30/phone to use it, maybe then there might be grounds for a conversation. Otherwise, NO SALE !!
    Last edited by BARYE; 07/06/2010 at 12:57 AM.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  12. #12  
    Concerning Nokia, some of their better known phones are still expensive and "upscale", unlocked anyway. They just aren't doing enough to warrant the prices.


    I made an error earlier. Their S60-3 E-71 business line and it's successors are actually still good phones. But their newer consumer oriented S60-5 phones are not cutting it anymore. People are sick of the interface, the less than stellar touchscreens and the low onboard memory. The browser sucks too.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    Concerning Nokia, some of their better known phones are still expensive and "upscale", unlocked anyway. They just aren't doing enough to warrant the prices.


    I made an error earlier. Their S60-3 E-71 business line and it's successors are actually still good phones. But their newer consumer oriented S60-5 phones are not cutting it anymore. People are sick of the interface, the less than stellar touchscreens and the low onboard memory. The browser sucks too.
    which american carrier is selling Nokia's "good" phones currently ??
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  14. #14  
    T-Mobile, the only one. They do have good contract prices. But they're from Europe and know Nokia, so..


    But US based online stores still sell the unlocked US version phones. Some are good prices, and some are not, considering the things I said earlier. North Americans who know Nokia will still buy those, but even those people are losing patience.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post
    ...

    As I've said before, M$ seems betwixt it. I don't see any indication that they are capable of creating any environment better than Apple's -- nor can I see them authoring an environment so so so very superior to Google's that OEMs are going to pay M$ $10-30 per unit for their glorified Windows Mobile 7.1.

    Margins are low on these gizmos -- nothing goes in unless it contributes to selling more of them. What can M$ say to Samsung that will convince them that using a M$ OS will get them m;ore sales than Android ???

    If it were FREE it would be tough.

    IF M$ PAID Samsung $30/phone to use it, maybe then there might be grounds for a conversation. Otherwise, NO SALE !!
    though this post is partly sarcastic, I really DO think it quite likely that M$ will offer some version of FREE to OEMs, to get them to use Windows Mobile 7..

    Either free for the first year, free for the first 100K units, free for the first million -- some GIANT incentive has to be offered to recapture the momentum lost to Android.

    Android is a hobby to Google -- a non-core plaything that it gives away in hopes of getting secondary revenue from indirect advertising etc. An investment made in large part to prevent Apple or anyone else from keeping it out of the mobile advertising space.

    OSes -- even mobile OSes -- are a core part of the M$ empire. Windows Mobile 7 is not a Zune, not a Kin, to M$.

    When M$ is scared they throw money at their boogie-men. They paid users to search and buy with Bing -- they're giving away more and more of their Office and programming applications to Silicon Valley start-ups, to schools.

    The only way to play catch up to a very good, free boogie-man, is for it to be free at least initially -- and very possibly to pay bribes for the first 100k to million units sold. Plus maybe picking up all promotion costs, guaranteeing against losses -- something, anything.

    M$ is desperate -- I can smell Balmer's fear ...
    Last edited by BARYE; 07/06/2010 at 06:44 AM.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  16.    #16  
    Hi all,

    One thing for sure, I am glad I was not the person in charge of the Kin program!

    Take care, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  17. #17  
    Been saying this from day one. HP did admit that the intelectual property was as inportant as the OS. I also believe that phones are a very small part of what HP plans to do with WEBOS.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post


    As for webOS, HP needs to hurry up or get left behind in the current phone wars. I do have a feeling though, that even though they claim smartphones are still on the list, webOS may be turned into something else and not exactly a phone OS.
  18.    #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by VaccPalm View Post
    Been saying this from day one. HP did admit that the intelectual property was as inportant as the OS. I also believe that phones are a very small part of what HP plans to do with WEBOS.
    Hi,

    I totally agree with you. I had a discussion, (via email), with the man that owns, dateBK, who said he thought there would be some pocket change for Palm, when it was bought up for good will.

    I told him, that besides the name Palm, there are a mountain of patents, many of which were granted, but were not able to implemented, as the technology was not yet ready.

    Then there of course, is the issue of webOS and all that it will become, (and how much it will then be worth).

    Mind you, that was just before the 1.2 billion dollar buyout offer. Most times, I could care less if I am proven right or wrong, but in this case, I am very pleased to have been right.

    Take care, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  19. #19  
    You were 100% correct. Good job. The patents , intelectual property and such palm owns is worth the 1.2 billion alone probally . and you get a kick azzz Os to boot with it. Money well spent by HP.
  20. kbaker's Avatar
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    #20  
    I was talking to a Verizon manager the other day and asked how many KIN's they have sold and he said, at our last meeting the entire North Eastern Maryland Division sold 28 KIN's...just thought I'd share
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