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  1.    #1  
    HI All,

    As the Android market grows, their OS is showing major growth problems. The market is so splintered, that is damaging itself. Therefore, when people get their next phone instead of considering Android, hopefully they will give the Pre & webOS a spin. Of course Android denies there is a problem, (like we believe Android).

    Take care, Jay


    What Android Fragmentation Problem?
    The Android platform is getting upgrades so frequently that there are phones powered by multiple versions of the OS for sale all at once.
    Harry McCracken
    Monday, May 24, 2010 02:00 AM PDT

    What Android Fragmentation Problem? - PCWorld

    At last week’s Google I|O conference, the last session I attended was a “fireside chat” in which Google employees discussed the Android platform with audience members. Someone asked about Android fragmentation–the fact that Android is getting upgrades so frequently that there are phones powered by multiple versions of the OS for sale all at once.


    The Android team member who fielded the question spent most of his time rejecting it as a valid subject of debate. He compared the situation to Microsoft releasing multiple versions of Windows in the 1990s. He said that it isn’t fragmentation if (for instance) all Android 1.6 phones are compatible. And he ended by adding that he didn’t even like to use the word “fragmentation.” The one he preferred was “progress.”

    I couldn’t quite tell if the question had struck a raw nerve, or if it simply seemed irrelevant. But the gist of the reply seems to be Google’s official stance on the matter. My friend Michael Gartenberg recently visited with Android honcho Andy Rubin, who pretty much said the same thing: Android isn’t getting fragmented.


    Okay, fine. As Michael says, it’s not fragmentation in the classic sense represented by Linux, in which multiple products can share the same version number yet be incompatible with each other. But that’s not terribly comforting news to anyone who just bought a brand new Android phone which lacks the latest features and can’t run apps such as Google Earth. And while it’s perfectly normal for tech products to become obsolete within months of their release, it remains very odd indeed for products that are just entering the market to run software that’s several versions old. Which is what’s happening with Android.


    It’s also a little odd to hear a Google employee defend Android by likening it to the old days when Microsoft was shipping both the Windows 9x and NT platforms, as if that were a scenario that anyone would strive for.


    In a sense, the Google guy who said that what’s going on is progress, not fragmentation, is absolutely right. The only reason why there are so many phones based on so many Android variants out there is because Google is cranking out meaty Android upgrades at a pace which handset manufacturers are unprepared to deal with.


    Android 1.5 shipped in April of 2009; 1.6 shipped in September; 2.0 shipped in October; 2.1 shipped in December; and 2.2 shipped last week. As Google finishes new features, it rolls them out rapidly in small batches, then gets back to work on the next batch–just as it does with a service such as Gmail. But with Gmail, Google can flip a switch and push new stuff out to every user in a few hours. It even managed to accomplish something similar with its own Nexus One phone: People who own Nexuses (Nexii?) with Android 2.1 are already getting the 2.2 update.


    Old-school phone makers and carriers just can’t keep up with that, which is why the Sprint EVO 4G phones which were distributed to I|O attendees–which, like the Nexus One, were manufactured by HTC–were running Android 2.1. The EVO’s hardware is impressive, but its software will feel a bit like day-old bread until it gets the 2.2 update. (HTC says that should happen at some unspecified time in the second half of this year.)


    After attending the Apple bashfest that was Google I|O’s Android keynote, I tend to suspect that Google’s relentless upgrading of Android stems only partially from the company’s genetic predisposition to iterate, iterate, iterate. It’s also about the race with the iPhone. Google wants to do everything in its power to put Android in the best possible competitive situation. So it’s not going to mimic Apple’s yearly upgrade schedule–it’ll get new features in the marketplace just as fast as it can. And it won’t stop anytime soon.


    Call it fragmentation; call it progress; call it whatever you like. For now, it’s a defining characteristic of the Android platform. The only way out I see is for manufacturers and carriers to figure out how to move at a pace that’s much closer to the one Google operates on. If they do, it would be a welcome breakthrough for everybody involved…
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    Google explained all this yesterday and its the same problem that HP would have . WIth the PRE on Verizon, SPrint and AT&T they all get there updates at different time. If the PRE was actually succesful you would see the same issues. Verizon would get theres today and Sprint 3 months down the road. there is no getting around it. Phone manufacters are the one who decide when updates are given. This was the same issue with the TREO.Sprint was getting updates and Verizon was not. While I love WEB OS as much as the next guy , Andorid aint going anywhere. This is a sign of the succes of Android more then anything else no matter how sucky Android is ( well 2.1)
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by VaccPalm View Post
    This was the same issue with the TREO.Sprint was getting updates and Verizon was not.
    Uh, no. No one was getting updates back then.

    While there may have been an early patch? Palm waited over a year to post an update for the Treo 700p, I think, and it was supposed to fix bluetooth problems. Made them worse in many cases, and no updates after.

    One thing that has impressed me about Palm this past year is they ARE sending out regular, iterative updates. The carriers may be slow to release them, as the above posters have pointed out. But one problem for Android is that you have to get the change to the manufacturer of each, then the carrier, who often has customized Android (Moto sense, etc.). Neither of these are true for Palm - they have been pushing out updates typically for Pre/Pix, Plus and Non Plus, GSM and CDMA (I guess 8 combos?), at the same time, or within weeks. The update then just has to pass the carrier hurdle. So this is one area where Palm could move faster than Google, if it had resources (hmm, HP is worlds biggest computer company...).
    KA1
    Visor Deluxe->Visor Prism/Digital Link->Treo 650->Treo 700p->Pre->GSM Unlocked Pre 2 (wifi only)->FrankenPre + Touchpad 32 ->+ Touchpad 4G ATT + ATT Pre3 + 64 White Touchpad... bliss.
  4. #4  
    the more thought i give it, the less I think androids fragmentation is a problem on the consumer level. most smartphone users probably don't even know they are using a smart phone. A lot people with android phones don't even know they are androidOS phones. Even fewer ever expect to get updates, so they have no idea that their phone is behind the curve. they don't know that their phone isn't compatible with some apps... they just go with the flow.
  5. #5  
    I got more then 1 update for my Treo. ( maybe it was the centro, same difference) not just patches. they updated the firmware twice I believe . Palm has been good so far with the Pre updates but dang they just are making my phone worse every update. Im still waiting for the update to fix all the issues ( memory , too many card , calls going to voice mail, freezing) since I got the PRE. WEB OS is still better then Andoroid but the qiuality of the updates matters too.
  6. #6  
    Honestly I can't compare it to the Pre. There are only two (well four) phones running WebOS. Updates come OTA, withing weeks on all carriers. The Iphone is in the only phone that runs Iphone OS, some can be updated some cannot, due to age and hardware quirks. That is expected.

    Have you seen the amount of phones running Android on the market? It is a totally incomparable situation. But maybe it isn't as dire as some would have it seem. I know people who run 1.0 and they don't seem to know that.

    The only how the Pre could be in a similar situation Andriod is if Palm, licenses it out to other phone manufacturers.
  7. #7  
    The problems happen when there is more then 1 phone carrier. Iphone has no issue becasue its AT&T. PRE had no issue up to now as it was just Sprint but now that the PRE is on 3 carriers they will have the same issues. All updates come from the phone carrier. They strip out what they dont want ( like teethering etc) and then they spit it out. COuld be months between updates from Sprint , Verizon and AT&T. ANdroid has it worse due to different carriers AND so many phones. I definetly like the Iphone and PRE approach there. In that aspect I hate Android phones. 1-2 phones. makes life easier .
    Last edited by VaccPalm; 05/24/2010 at 10:09 AM.
  8. #8  
    Is it really necessay to update so frequently? In order to keep up or at least position themselves as a dominant player against the Iphone is not to release updates every month. IMO I feel that is major problem. Each update gets a new phone, new hardware, etc.

    Has Google considered evolving the current hardware in places, or perhaps, just keep software version a little more constraint. Imagine seeing 1.6 to maybe straight to 2.2. Thats a major annoucement. All this other crap in between is simply publicity. What other software does Google update this rapidly? Nuts IMO.. Flooding, and temping each hardware manf. will a new version that nobody else has is certainly 'fragmentation' in my eyes. At least Apple (whom I dispise) is on a schedule. (I guess a new phone every month is a scedule too...
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyPre View Post
    Is it really necessay to update so frequently? In order to keep up or at least position themselves as a dominant player against the Iphone is not to release updates every month. IMO I feel that is major problem. Each update gets a new phone, new hardware, etc.

    Has Google considered evolving the current hardware in places, or perhaps, just keep software version a little more constraint. Imagine seeing 1.6 to maybe straight to 2.2. Thats a major annoucement. All this other crap in between is simply publicity. What other software does Google update this rapidly? Nuts IMO.. Flooding, and temping each hardware manf. will a new version that nobody else has is certainly 'fragmentation' in my eyes. At least Apple (whom I dispise) is on a schedule. (I guess a new phone every month is a scedule too...
    The iPhone has versions throughout the year as well. I find that incremental updates serve a platform better, and that opinion is shared by Apple, Microsoft, and Palm.

    Google fragmentation is a result of hardware variation and the fact that there are no minimum requirements imposed by Google. Palm fragmentation is minor due to the fact that Palm controls the hardware.

    Also, did you catch Google calling it Legacy OS's and not fragmentation? That's kinda like calling crap brown playdough.
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  10. #10  
    Well there is a 2.2 minimum...but its not like the prior version of android is unusable. Just a better version out there.

    What hurts this is not consumer side...but developer side. Good needs to setup Android classes of sort....low spec, mid spec, high spec. And let the developers work with those spec classes.

    If a hardware manufacture goes out of those specs or something with resolution...well, thats their own suicide.

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