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  1. #41  
    I love my palm pre plus. Best. Phone. Ever.!
  2. #42  
    Quote Originally Posted by coolguyslim View Post
    I love my palm pre plus. Best. Phone. Ever.!
    Cool. All that matters is you're happy with whatever it is that you own.
  3. #43  
    Quote Originally Posted by barkerja View Post
    It's completely seamless, as it's not just a notification that's being pushed but the actual data/message. So when you open the app the message(s) are there.
    And if you want to answer, you have to start a new session.
  4. #44  
    Quote Originally Posted by barkerja View Post
    In comparison not nearly as much, no.
    So being subscribed to a GPS service and using another different app consumes much less than using directly the GPS from your app, isn't it?

    Wait, wait, this is better: playing audio on background when using another app consumes much less than playing audio on background and using another app?
    Last edited by deCorvett; 04/11/2010 at 02:56 PM.
  5. #45  
    All of you are talking the way Jobs draws it: people keeping all the apps open, because they don't know how to close them. Wrong. Multitasking isn't Evil, it's the way things have to be. If Apple isn't capable to do a multitasking device with a decent battery life and a decent way to handle open apps, it's only Apple's fault. Don't demonize multitasking.

    The only fact here is that I can choice to open more than one app. But not necessarily I have to keep more than one app open at a time. It's my choice, not Apple's choice.
  6. #46  
    Its about time they added it but I don't like how you have to press the home button so many times to bring up the task manager thingy. I love how simple it is to multitask with WebOS and even though Apple fanbots are going to brag about it no one can do it like Palm can...
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    #47  
    Another issue that people seem to ignore is bad apps. That is the reason for why multitasking on mobile devices sucks. Bad developers who don't code properly cause these problems in the first place and what apple is basically saying is "since developers can't fix these issues, we are going to do it for them". Application that is not optimized and properly coded will cause these issues: battery draining, memory hogging, cpu utilization, etc. So developers also have to be careful on how they code and if applications are coded properly then we wouldn't have these issues in the first place.
  8. #48  
    Quote Originally Posted by kalex View Post
    Another issue that people seem to ignore is bad apps. That is the reason for why multitasking on mobile devices sucks. Bad developers who don't code properly cause these problems in the first place and what apple is basically saying is "since developers can't fix these issues, we are going to do it for them". Application that is not optimized and properly coded will cause these issues: battery draining, memory hogging, cpu utilization, etc. So developers also have to be careful on how they code and if applications are coded properly then we wouldn't have these issues in the first place.
    After reading this post, I think they have ground. It really can't judge from the appearance until we are holding OS4 device.
  9. #49  
    Quote Originally Posted by kalex View Post
    Another issue that people seem to ignore is bad apps. That is the reason for why multitasking on mobile devices sucks. Bad developers who don't code properly cause these problems in the first place and what apple is basically saying is "since developers can't fix these issues, we are going to do it for them". Application that is not optimized and properly coded will cause these issues: battery draining, memory hogging, cpu utilization, etc. So developers also have to be careful on how they code and if applications are coded properly then we wouldn't have these issues in the first place.
    Maybe if Apple do their "quality control" in the App Store checking if the app works instead of checking if it hurts their bussiness would help in this matter.
  10. DocLee's Avatar
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    #50  
    Quote Originally Posted by deCorvett View Post
    So being subscribed to a GPS service and using another different app consumes much less than using directly the GPS from your app, isn't it?
    I'm going to play devil's advocate here, but yes. It could. The scenario would be for an application like "Layar". Layar is an app that does some interesting augmented reality overlays in real time. As you pan the phone, it will give you address/info overlays for your current position. However, that data has to be pulled in real time. So, if you keep the application in the foreground, you're not only consuming GPS data, but, you're also utilizing data services. If you background the app, however, you can still have the app keep an accurate GPS position, but the data connection is no longer active for that application until it's foregrounded again. You can also add video on top of all of that because Layar makes use of a live video display.
    There are a couple of major battery killers for applications. Data is a big one and video is a big one.

    Wait, wait, this is better: playing audio on background when using another app consumes much less than playing audio on background and using another app?
    Data and UI come into play here. Take something like SHOUTcast for the Iphone. When it's foregrounded, you'll get ad rotation as well as a UI interface with this animation that shows the station is streaming correctly. If you background the application, you're essentially only using audio services and stream data. You won't have ad rotation sucking up bandwidth (granted, it's not a lot but it can add up over time) and the UI is suspended meaning that animations are also suspended. A continuous animation can definitely suck down some battery.

    Personally, I don't see anything wrong with how Apple is implementing multitasking. It's not nearly as elegant as the implementation in WebOS, but, I think that WebOS can also take a few key points on backgrounded application suspension to improve battery life. These things really should be built into the SDK rather than individual developers having to implement them in every single application every single time. If we look at phones in general, the majority of the time, a phone is spent in a pocket or in a purse for the vast majority of users. Application suspension could go a long way in improving overall battery life of a phone that is supposed to be application intensive. When that display goes off, I'd like to see applications go completely suspended except for essential services such as audio for a streaming music app (obviously my main concern) or a long polling internet connection for something like an instant messaging application. Currently, in terms of coding with the WebOS SDK, it's just the opposite. Instead of these being core features of normal application function, things such as display off/on need to be coded by the developer. Therefore, a hastily thrown together application that is data intensive isn't necessarily going to conserve power for the end user even if the display goes off.

    So, overall, it's different. It's not on par with the ease of use of WebOS but it's not a bad implementation. It will serve most users just fine. It's very Android-ish in terms of implementation. For an Android device, you'd just long hold the Home key and you'd have a selector of the most recently used applications. Not much difference except that "backgrounded" Android apps have a bit more access to services such as a data connection than the Iphone SDK allows.

    Doc

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  11. #51  
    Best post in the whole thread.
    Pixi: Sold. Pre: Passed off to another rep. Touchpad: Just a toy until Cloud syncing arrives, and a better doc editor.
  12. #52  
    Yeah, multiple swipes and a button press is just sooo much easier than two button presses.
    Quote Originally Posted by iTz Nicholas72 View Post
    Its about time they added it but I don't like how you have to press the home button so many times to bring up the task manager thingy. I love how simple it is to multitask with WebOS and even though Apple fanbots are going to brag about it no one can do it like Palm can...
    Pixi: Sold. Pre: Passed off to another rep. Touchpad: Just a toy until Cloud syncing arrives, and a better doc editor.
  13. #53  
    Quote Originally Posted by crogs571 View Post
    Yeah, multiple swipes and a button press is just sooo much easier than two button presses.
    In his defense, weren't they saying something like you have to do two button presses for multitasking, and one to do something else or something? I don't remember the details, but I could've sworn I read something like that.
  14. DocLee's Avatar
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    #54  
    I don't like the two button press idea if one button press still closes the application. You get into kind of a timing issue. It really should be one button press to background the application/pull up the switcher and two button presses to close the application completely/bring to home. That would seem more intuitive to me.

    Doc

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  15. #55  
    not sure if it was a double or a long press. Wasn't paying that much attention to it. Either way, two or three button presses can't be more difficult than multiple swipes (depending on how many cards you have open) and a button press. It's just different and what one is used to. Android is similar with a long press of the home button to bring up the open app list which would be my preference for that method.
    Pixi: Sold. Pre: Passed off to another rep. Touchpad: Just a toy until Cloud syncing arrives, and a better doc editor.
  16. #56  
    Quote Originally Posted by DocLee View Post
    It really should be one button press to background the application/pull up the switcher and two button presses to close the application completely/bring to home. That would seem more intuitive to me.

    Doc

    RadioTime Developer
    The 50 million people who have been using iPhones, iPod Touches, and iPads for anywhere from a week to three years might feel differently since we've become accustomed to pressing home once to go to the home screen.

    Apple usually tries to avoid changing existing conventions when implementing new features. Double tap home used to be customizable, now it's fixed to task switching on capable devices. It was the compromise that affected the least essential use of the home button, which I think makes perfect sense.
  17. #57  
    so what does a long press on the button do? Haven't played with one in awhile. Though I'm guessing it shuts the screen down.
    Pixi: Sold. Pre: Passed off to another rep. Touchpad: Just a toy until Cloud syncing arrives, and a better doc editor.
  18. #58  
    Quote Originally Posted by crogs571 View Post
    so what does a long press on the button do? Haven't played with one in awhile. Though I'm guessing it shuts the screen down.
    Long press does nothing. If you were to were to press it for say 3 seconds or more, and then let go nothing happens. At least that was the case when I had an iPhone a year ago.
  19. #59  
    Quote Originally Posted by barkerja View Post
    Long press does nothing. If you were to were to press it for say 3 seconds or more, and then let go nothing happens. At least that was the case when I had an iPhone a year ago.
    Are we talking about the home button? Back in the 2.x days, holding down home would basically kill -9 an application. I think a long press brings up voice control in 3.x.
  20. DocLee's Avatar
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    #60  
    Quote Originally Posted by natrixgli View Post
    The 50 million people who have been using iPhones, iPod Touches, and iPads for anywhere from a week to three years might feel differently since we've become accustomed to pressing home once to go to the home screen.

    Apple usually tries to avoid changing existing conventions when implementing new features. Double tap home used to be customizable, now it's fixed to task switching on capable devices. It was the compromise that affected the least essential use of the home button, which I think makes perfect sense.
    The question becomes whether or not a single tap still closes the running application or if it immediately backgrounds it to a suspended state. If it does close the application, then from a user experience perspective, it doesn't make sense to make a double tap open the task switcher. It makes more sense to single tap to open up the task switcher and then another tap to close the currently running application. It's a matter of just how quickly the double tap needs to be pressed in order to background an application to the tasks switcher. If you do it too slow, then your application (and application state) are closed out. It's like the Cydia application "Backgrounder." There have been several times where I didn't hold the button long enough (trying to background an application when somebody comes to talk to me or whatnot) and I've lost the application state.

    Change isn't necessarily a bad thing. You also have to remember that this change is only going to be implemented into the latest generation of iphones, touches, and the ipad. It's a good time to rethink implementation.

    Doc

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