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  1.    #1  
    I wonder if Sharp is going to buy these guys out and take development in-house?
    http://www.linuxgram.com/article.pl?...tion=newsflash
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  2. #2  
    Originally posted by Toby
    I wonder if Sharp is going to buy these guys out and take development in-house?
    http://www.linuxgram.com/article.pl?...tion=newsflash
    It's pretty clear that Sharp wants to stay out of the software development business. Sharp recognizes that their strength is hardware and that it's better to license software from outside firms than to try to do it in-house.

    Lineo only did the kernel and driver software for the Zaurus and that really shouldn't require much maintenance. Where improvements are likely is in the apps and GUI environment - and that's all Trolltech's work. Embedded Linux vendors are pretty easy to come by, so if Lineo goes down, it should be no problem for Sharp to farm out any future kernel work to anothe vendor.
    <ul><li>Dave Kessler<br>President - Kopsis, Inc.</li></ul>
  3.    #3  
    Dave, know of any good catalog sites for Zaurus software? I'm curious to see what's out there (although I don't know whether embedded Linux will ever grow enough to attract my personal killer app).
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  4. #4  
    First I have heard that Lineo got a reinvestment and the CEO is accepting a $1/year salary until the company is profitable again. As far as good sites for Zaurus I've found that http://www.zauruszone.com/ is the Visorcentral of Zaurus websites... http://www.myzaurus.com/ and click the software/appliactions on the side menu for software list.
  5.    #5  
    Originally posted by Techie2000
    First I have heard that Lineo got a reinvestment and the CEO is accepting a $1/year salary until the company is profitable again.
    That's what I heard him claim, also. The current investors seem to consider that inaccurate.
    As far as good sites for Zaurus I've found that http://www.zauruszone.com/ is the Visorcentral of Zaurus websites... http://www.myzaurus.com/ and click the software/appliactions on the side menu for software list.
    I'll check out zauruszone when I get a chance. I wasn't impressed by the selection at Sharp's site. The only personal finance software was a handheld version of a Linux program. It looked interesting, but since I just bought a new computer with XP and upgraded Quicken, I'm not ready to blow that money yet.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by Toby
    Dave, know of any good catalog sites for Zaurus software? I'm curious to see what's out there (although I don't know whether embedded Linux will ever grow enough to attract my personal killer app).
    It depends on what you're looking for. The selection of commercial grade Qtopia applications is still pretty thin. Most of the commercial stuff that's available can be found at myzaurus.com. For a more complete list of apps (including open source stuff) check out the Zaurus Software Index. And last, but not least, if you're not afraid of good old fashioned console apps, many of the packages in the ARM port of Debian Linux will install and run on the Zaurus (I got fetchmail, procmail, and mutt working that way).
    <ul><li>Dave Kessler<br>President - Kopsis, Inc.</li></ul>
  7.    #7  
    Originally posted by dkessler
    It depends on what you're looking for.
    I'm looking for basically the same functionality that I already have. The killer app that I mentioned is Pocket Quicken. Considering that desktop Linux isn't big enough to blip on Intuit's radar yet, I'm not sure when embedded Linux will blip either (although if the lack of a PocketPC version is any indicator...). I'm sure that most of the other stuff I use will have some similar equivalent (DocsToGo, SplashPhoto, etc.).
    The selection of commercial grade Qtopia applications is still pretty thin.
    That's not unexpected at this point, nor a bad thing yet. I'm not planning on making a firm decision for another 6 months at least.
    Most of the commercial stuff that's available can be found at myzaurus.com. For a more complete list of apps (including open source stuff) check out the Zaurus Software Index. And last, but not least, if you're not afraid of good old fashioned console apps, many of the packages in the ARM port of Debian Linux will install and run on the Zaurus (I got fetchmail, procmail, and mutt working that way).
    *shrug* I'm definitely not 'afraid' of any of that, but I'm just not sure I've got the motivation to start fiddling with them on a PDA. I'm a firm believer in the 'PDA as PC Companion and not laptop replacement' concept.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  8. #8  
    I finally saw one of these today, at my local Staples. They didn't have any on display, I had to ask them to drag one out of the back. They were good enough to open the box and let me hold the unit, but it hadn't been charged so I couldn't turn it on.

    The hardware was very, very nice. I'm tempted to buy one, but unlike some of you I am intimidated by "good old console apps" mostly because I don't know what they are, to start with.

    Dammit Jim, I'm a lawyer, not a IT guy.
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by Toby
    The killer app that I mentioned is Pocket Quicken.
    Right now, the only two personal finance apps for the Zaurus are tkcKapital and an open source app called Stash. I don't consider either to be "ready for prime time" yet, but perhaps in a few months they'll be a little more solid. I don't think we'll ever see Pocket Quicken for the Zaurus ... hopefully one of the third party apps will eventually offer decent Quicken integration.

    I'm sure that most of the other stuff I use will have some similar equivalent (DocsToGo, SplashPhoto, etc.).
    Yes, you can get DocsToGo type functionality with Hancom Mobile Office (free with the SL-5500) and SplashPhoto capabilities with the built in image viewer or one of two or three third-party replacements.

    *shrug* I'm definitely not 'afraid' of any of that (console apps), but I'm just not sure I've got the motivation to start fiddling with them on a PDA. I'm a firm believer in the 'PDA as PC Companion and not laptop replacement' concept.
    Right now the Zaurus is actually better at filling the "replacement" role than the "companion" roll. Syncing still has issues and most apps are not designed to integrate with a desktop counterpart. The Hancom apps are the exception to that, but even with those I suspect the process of syncing documents with Office on the desktop is not as "seamless" as it is with DocsToGo. IMHO, that is the one area where Sharp dropped the ball on the Zaurus. I think the usage pattern of PDAs in Japan (where Sharp has a lot of experience) and with developers worldwide is much less "desktop centric" than it is for PDAs in the hands of normal US users. Hopefully this is an area where Sharp (and their software contractors) are hard at work on improvements.
    <ul><li>Dave Kessler<br>President - Kopsis, Inc.</li></ul>
  10. #10  
    Originally posted by VTL
    The hardware was very, very nice. I'm tempted to buy one, but unlike some of you I am intimidated by "good old console apps" mostly because I don't know what they are, to start with.

    Dammit Jim, I'm a lawyer, not a IT guy.
    The old MS-DOS version of WordPerfect (familiar to most lawyers) is an example of a "console app". No mouse, no proper "GUI", just text on the screen and a keyboard to control everything. Such apps have largely disappeared from the Windows landscape because they are usually difficult to learn. However, they're still popular in the Linux world because once learned they can be far more efficient (both in terms of computer resources required and in terms of productivity) than their GUI counterparts.

    For example, I use Mutt as my mail client on both the desktop and my Zaurus. If you look at a screenshot you might think that it's far more primitive than something like Outlook. However, it's more customizable, has far more features, and is an order of magnitude more efficient. Of course to use it, I had to learn how to tweak dozens of settings the a configuration file, memorize keystrokes for each operation, and I also had to provide my own text editor for composing messages.

    Needless to say, console apps are not for everyone. They require a lot of patience and effort to master and getting them to install and run on the Zaurus will require at least intermediate Linux knowledge. But whether you use them or not, it's nice to see a PDA that actually offers that option
    <ul><li>Dave Kessler<br>President - Kopsis, Inc.</li></ul>
  11.    #11  
    Originally posted by VTL
    I finally saw one of these today, at my local Staples. They didn't have any on display, I had to ask them to drag one out of the back. They were good enough to open the box and let me hold the unit, but it hadn't been charged so I couldn't turn it on.
    The local Office Depot has one on the shelf hooked into AC, so no worries here.
    The hardware was very, very nice. I'm tempted to buy one, but unlike some of you I am intimidated by "good old console apps" mostly because I don't know what they are, to start with.

    Dammit Jim, I'm a lawyer, not a IT guy.
    heh...well, I _am_ an IT guy, but I'm not really in the mood to fiddle on a PDA. I've got computers for experimentation, and I've got computers for work. I try to not mix the two.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  12.    #12  
    Originally posted by dkessler
    Right now, the only two personal finance apps for the Zaurus are tkcKapital and an open source app called Stash. I don't consider either to be "ready for prime time" yet, but perhaps in a few months they'll be a little more solid.
    Yeah, I took a look at tkcKapital. It looks slick, but seems geared towards their desktop Linux Kapital (which also looks interesting, but as I mentioned previously, I'm not ready to lose my recent Quicken and Windows money yet).
    I don't think we'll ever see Pocket Quicken for the Zaurus ... hopefully one of the third party apps will eventually offer decent Quicken integration.
    I'm not sure if we'll ever see it for the Zaurus specifically, but if Qtopia/Embedded Linux as a platform catches on and sells 5-10 million units (or if somebody convinces an Intuit partner it has the potential to), it's a possibility. After all, there used to be a Pocket Quicken for CE. I suspect the lack of one for PocketPC has more to do with desktop Money than anything else.
    Yes, you can get DocsToGo type functionality with Hancom Mobile Office (free with the SL-5500) and SplashPhoto capabilities with the built in image viewer or one of two or three third-party replacements.
    I thought that I remembered seeing those on the OD one.
    Right now the Zaurus is actually better at filling the "replacement" role than the "companion" roll.
    Yep, but I'll still be watching it to see what develops.
    Syncing still has issues and most apps are not designed to integrate with a desktop counterpart.
    One wonders if Sharp has Zoomeritis.
    The Hancom apps are the exception to that, but even with those I suspect the process of syncing documents with Office on the desktop is not as "seamless" as it is with DocsToGo. IMHO, that is the one area where Sharp dropped the ball on the Zaurus. I think the usage pattern of PDAs in Japan (where Sharp has a lot of experience) and with developers worldwide is much less "desktop centric" than it is for PDAs in the hands of normal US users. Hopefully this is an area where Sharp (and their software contractors) are hard at work on improvements.
    I think it'll be up to the contractors.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  13. #13  
    The old MS-DOS version of WordPerfect (familiar to most lawyers) is an example of a "console app".
    Ahh, I see. Yes, I remember the old WP very fondly.

    To be honest, I used to be an "IT guy" sort of. In law school in the late 80s I ran the school computer lab. I had a pretty good working knowledge of how DOS worked, memorized most the commands, etc. I kind of miss DOS - Windows are pretty, but when something broke in the old days I knew how to fix it.

    Of course, after I got out of law school I became a mere user, and I haven't stayed current. I know what Linux is, but can't say I know how to use it.

    As posted in a different thread, I'm looking to upgrade from my Prism. Sounds to me like the Sharp may not be the way to go for me at this point, much as I love the hardware. Maybe the Sony NR-70.
  14. #14  
    I took Toby's advice, and swung by the local Office Depot to check out a powered-up Zaurus. The screen was very, very nice. Unfortunately, they had the thing bolted to the shelf, so you couldn't extend the keyboard and play with the thing.

    That said, I also stopped by CompUSA (conveniently located next to the Office Depot), and looked at the newest Sony, the NR-70. As impressed as I am by the Zaurus, I think the Sony is a slightly more impressive piece of hardware, and the software side is more mature. The Zaurus may have more potential, but for now I'd probably go with the Sony.

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