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  1.    #1  
    Today, I go to use a nice Ipaq PPC. I hated it. I can't imagine what Microsoft was thinking with this OS! PDA's should be simple devices for average users, with upgrade potential for power users. The PPC is very powerful, but terribly complex for basic users.

    Here us my "PPC is Yucky" list.
    1. Activesync is annoying. Plop the thing in the cradle and away it goes... Wait... I wanted to choose 'Desktop overwrites handheld!"
    2. The Ipaq sleeve is an irritant. The sleeve popped of several times while I was trying to seat it in the cradle. I had to hold onto it and the ipaq and gently wiggle it in the cradle.
    3. Programs stay open after you use them and move on to something else. I got sick of the message "Your handheld is out of memory, please click on blah blah blah, select yackety-yack, and close down open programs". Thank goodness this cruddy feature was fixed in PPC 2002.
    4. The contact manager is terribly counter-intuitive. The silly "scroll pad" would not work when i expected it to. Looking up names was a pain. If I did not have 18 years of experience on PC's, it would have taken several hours to truly understand how it worked. I can train most customers on the Palm OS contact manager in about 10 minutes.
    5. The calandar is OK. No real complaints.
    6. I never thought that not having a "graffitti area" would be annoying, but it is!. maybe it is just a matter of getting used to it, but I had to constantly look at it to see where I was writing. I think this one is just in my head, though.
    7. If you don't sync with outlook, prepare to be screwed! i used "Companionlink" to syncronize with my clients Act 2000 database. Even the guys at companionlink were complaining to me on how they have to do it. Apparently, microsoft does not have any real ability to have activesync use anything except outlook. The programmers had to write code that opens and closes the act database with every record to get it to work. It is SLOOOOOOW. Hotsync conduits are a dream to work with in comparison.
    8. Getting to you different applications and programs is counter-intuitive.

    In short, even though the Ipaq has a CPU that is 8 times faster than my Prism, I can find information and do real work in 1/2 the time. This truly drives the point home to me that Palm is doing the right thing by sticking with Simplicity.

    Doug
  2. #2  
    My limited experience with my older sister's Ipaq was very similar. I really hated not having a graffitti area. Even with the soft graffitti area on the handera it's easy to have access to. I can't complain about the multimedia and high res screen though. I don't like how MS basically ports their desktop OS's to PDA's. Palm OS may have similar memory problems if Palm isn't careful. Only reason we don't have memory problems now like PPC does is that palm os can't multi-task. So it's nearly impossible to have the same memory issues.
    You know it's bad when your Calculus Professor uses the word "Unpossible"

    "It's a long way from my thoughts to what I'll say, It's a long, long way from paradise to where I am today." -Switchfoot, Home
  3. #3  
    Well, I'd totally agree with you on some points, but disagree on others.

    I personally dislike the iPaq to no end...I think the sleeve mentality stinks. Why would I want to double the size of my PDA, or lug around this huge sleeve, just for expansion? The Jornada's solution is 1000x better. And the iPaq's cradle is terrible.

    ActiveSync is a totally different deal though...the beauty of ActiveSync is that you don't ever have to push a 'Sync' button, and then wait 3+ minutes for the PDA to get updates, while you sit there and become later & later for a meeting...I tell you what, ActiveSync is a great solution. And if you need it to overwrite something, plop it in the cradle, stop the current activesync, and away you go, choose the options you need and just sync that one part.

    Letter Recognizer is awesome! Normal letters AND you get to see where you writing like Handera's virtual tracing thing...very cool. Plus with PPC2002, you can use Block Recognizer which is just Graffiti with a different name.

    The lack of ability to close programs is a manufacture independent function...on the Jornada's this isn't an issue. Its also been widely critized on the PocketPC newsgroups...you can load WisBar, and it adds this function for you, Plus some other nice features...much the same was we Palm nuts load 3rd party apps to functionality to our PDAs.

    Yeah, if you're not on Outlook, you'll have some slow syncs coming up...although, I must say, I sync'd with Notes to my Jornada using Intellisync, and never had a problem!

    Just a few thoughts!!!
  4. #4  
    Man, I played with an iPaq just the other day too! It twas the 3870 (w/ Bluetooth).

    Background info: I've been a Palm OS PDA user for more than 8 months and thats from beginner to heavy user

    Anyways, I turned the iPaq on... and ok, there was the familiar Start button. I pressed it. And I got a little confused! It was damn difficult to use!

    I saw Windows media player, and tapped it. It loaded some Spiderman movie trailer... and suddenly, it kept switching between foreground and background! And I could not find any close button!!! And after 3 minutes of being "shocked", I passed it back to the rightful owner, to tame the darned thing.

    LOL.

    My second experience with PPC and it was baaad.
    Maybe I'm fated to use a Palm OS device.. ~

    Hehe. Cheers.
    :shortcut: my little webby
    I still love my Visor Prism
  5. #5  
    I used an old WinCE device before i got my Visor. It was okay but third hand and was broken, had little if any app support. I did like the writing area better, and the notepad. Also the screen never scratched . But I like my Visor better . But the Zaurus makes me drool...
  6. #6  
    I checked out an iPaq at one of those Office Max/Depot stores the other day, and I must agree, they do seem hard to use. Maybe the difficulty comes partially from the multi-task capability of the thingy.
  7. #7  
    PocketPC is much less intuitive than the PalmOS, I know this, I own an iPAQ 3835, but once you learn to use it, which generally takes about a day, it's a great OS. You get to liking that you actually have something akin to a PC in your hand, you can do DOS, or Apple emulation, and if they ever get the legal kinks worked out, there's a PalmOS emulator on the way too.

    Not to mention the fact that certain features are much better integrated on a PPC, such as sending a Word document via email, or opening attachments and editing them.

    And last up, superior multimedia, and with WMA 8, you can store more music for the same amount of space, ditto with WMV.

    Here's a question for anyone complaining about PPC usability. Did any of you learn to completely use a PC the first time you turned one on ever?
  8. #8  
    Originally posted by b1lanceman
    [...] Here's a question for anyone complaining about PPC usability. Did any of you learn to completely use a PC the first time you turned one on ever?
    You say that like it doesn't just highlight the whole problem with that mentality with bright flashing neon lights. Who said that it _should_ be difficult to pick up right away?
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by Toby
    Who said that it _should_ be difficult to pick up right away?
    PPC owners, of course.
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  10. mhc48#CB's Avatar
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    #10  
    The iPaq is definitely less intuitive than my Prism, but to give the Devil it's due, PPC2002 is far easier to learn and live with than the old OS. And the iTask also helps tremendously.

    After a year of letting it sit around unused, I began in January to play around with it (my excuse was that my Audible Advisor module was broken and I wanted to finish two books while waiting for the replacement). Audible Books still work better on my Prism but I must say that being able to load three whole Audible books (instead of only a 16mg part of a book) on the iPaq (with a 128 CF card) is terrific.

    I've also begun listening to a lot of mp3s (and wma files) on the iPaq, and recorded a few messages to myself while driving. With my Prism, I would have probably risked my life trying to scrawl a short note while keeping one eye on the road and two hours latter not being able to figure out what I wrote. Those features are awesome, and I can't understand why Palm and HS haven't incorporated music play into any of their units like Sony has.

    No matter what any iPaq user trys to tells you, the Prism screen is far brighter and has better hue saturation. You can crank the iPaq up to maximum brightness and then it's better, but you only get about half a day's use, much less if (like me) you waste a lot of your time on games. Still the colors are faded and dull compared to the Prism


    The real drawback and drag of the iPaq (and it's major on my 3650 anyway) is the sleeve which doubles the size and weight of the unit. For me it's what makes it absolutely unusable as something I'd carry around with me every day. However, that drawback is totally eliminated by the new PPCs most of which have either SD or CF slots built in, and several of which, like the Toshiba/Audiovox twin have both. That add's up to a heck of a lot of storage, features and usability with a size and weight factor very close to the Prism. Now that HS is retreating from the springboard paradigm, I have much less reason to stay with it in the future.

    In fact I was all set to get a Toshiba until the new Intel processors were announced last week. Right now I'm surprizinly undecided as to which way I will go and will likely spend the next few months or weeks going back and forth between the Prism and iPaq.
    -Michael-
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by MHCohn
    [...] Those features are awesome, and I can't understand why Palm and HS haven't incorporated music play into any of their units like Sony has. [...]
    I can. Basic .wav playback and recording (like in the Handera) might be OK AFAIC, but I surely wouldn't pay anything extra for MP3 capability (like the Sonys).
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  12. #12  
    Toby, what I was saying is that it is more complicated to use a device with more capabilities, at least in general.

    I prefer my iPAQ over my PalmIIIc any day of the week. Did it take time to learn to use my iPAQ? Yes, was it worth it? Yes
  13. #13  
    Originally posted by b1lanceman
    Toby, what I was saying is that it is more complicated to use a device with more capabilities, at least in general.
    And I believe that what he is saying (and if he is not, I will), is that with a well thought out design it doesn't need to.

    Another aspect is looking at what PPC does that Palm can't. It is a short list. Granted, PPC can do everything a Palm can, but not nearly as well.

    Regardless, this argument is cliche and, in civilized debate, reduces to admonishments to purchase a device that suits one's needs.
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  14. mhc48#CB's Avatar
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    #14  
    Regarding the ease of use controversy, one thing overlooked is that after using one OS for a long period (and for that matter, making it almost a part of our life, as many of us do with our PDAs) the particular OS that has become second nature to us and which we come to rely on, "seems" to be more intuitive than another OS or paradigm simply because we're so used to it.

    I started with Sharp Wizards and the Zaurus and for a long time, I and other Zaurus fans often put down Palm for the lack of a keyboard and Graffitti as difficult to learn; and a method of data input that required the user to be trained rather than the unit to adapt to users. Truth was (though I didn't recognize it at the time) that I was so comfortaable with the Sharp conventions that I was intimidated by the prospect of Graffiti. Finally, when they stopped making the Zaurus and I had exhausted my supply of refurbed ones and I bought by first Palm, I was surprized at how easy it was to learn how to use. What it took was a combination of necessity and an open mind. Now that I'm comfortable with Grafitti I wonder why anyone would want a "thumbboard".

    I think you'd find the same with the current PPC OS. Yes, WinCE was clearly an absolutely non-intuitive OS, but 20002 is a LOT better.

    Also, though many of us here sing the praise of the Palm OS, truth be told. many, if not most "power users" have long abandoned the original applications and launcher in favor of some other program. Similarly there are many such replacements for the PPC as well.
    -Michael-
  15. #15  
    The thing is, we're talking about PDAs, Personal Digital ASSISTANTS. Let's remember that. These things are suppose to *cough* HELP US! Not cause more trouble and frustration. They're suppose to be easy to use, and quick for the most basic apps. The PIM apps. Which PPC does just ok...PalmOS kicks **** there, because they're the ones that pioneered it. Before we start talking about other features, think about what it is. At least what you "should" have bought it for. Back in the old days, haha, when you picked up a new planner, did you ever have to think about how to use it? How to add a new entry, or modify something? NO!!! It was a piece of cake, and that's exactly how PalmOS is. The new models are as easy to use as the old ones.

    Now, when we start diving into features, they get equally hard to use, but basic UI and navigation is just as easy in PalmOS. PPC is just as hard to use as Windows. We all already have to put up with windows most of the time when we're using a computer, why do you wanna put up with it when you're away from home?!?! These PDAs are suppose to be easy, and give us quick access to our data.

    From there, they're toys...and some of us liked cars, action figures, or whatever! Some of us liked the more fancy toys, and some the simple ones. It's the preference of the user, but at most basic, PPC doesn't cut it. The fact is, none of us really want to learn how to use another windows, it's hard enough, many of us still have trouble with it, why walk into a trap?

    MacOS all the way!
    nelson.hsieh
    good artists copy, great artists steal. . .
  16. #16  
    Originally posted by b1lanceman
    Toby, what I was saying is that it is more complicated to use a device with more capabilities, at least in general.
    Yes, I fully realize that's what you were saying. I wasn't questioning whether it was generally so, but rather why people are willing to assume that it must necessarily _be_ so.
    I prefer my iPAQ over my PalmIIIc any day of the week. Did it take time to learn to use my iPAQ? Yes, was it worth it? Yes
    And imagine how much _more_ valuable it would have been had that power not taken so 'long' to learn.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  17. #17  
    Originally posted by MHCohn
    Regarding the ease of use controversy, one thing overlooked is that after using one OS for a long period (and for that matter, making it almost a part of our life, as many of us do with our PDAs) the particular OS that has become second nature to us and which we come to rely on, "seems" to be more intuitive than another OS or paradigm simply because we're so used to it. [...]
    I've used Windows of one flavor or another since Windows 286/386. I don't think I ever recall feeling any version 'intuitive'. I have the same problem with the 'big two' Linux window managers. They're just apeing MS apeing the Mac (coincidence that ximian is so close to simian? maybe not ). Being used to something does not make it intuitive, IMO.
    I think you'd find the same with the current PPC OS. Yes, WinCE was clearly an absolutely non-intuitive OS, but 20002 is a LOT better. [...]
    Sure, and syphillis is a lot better than cancer, but I'd rather not have either of them.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  18. #18  
    Originally posted by Toby
    I've used Windows of one flavor or another since Windows 286/386. I don't think I ever recall feeling any version 'intuitive'. I have the same problem with the 'big two' Linux window managers. They're just apeing MS apeing the Mac (coincidence that ximian is so close to simian? maybe not ). Being used to something does not make it intuitive, IMO.
    You should join us my friend, the freedom fighters, and move onto a Macintosh . I came to the realization when Windows 2000 came out. I had to choose, glad I chose MacOS. They're both great OS's, but clearly, MacOS is much easier and cleaner to use. Prettier too. Windows 2000 is still great stuff, but no where near OS X. Let's leave it at that...

    I can remember Windows 2.0...now that was ghetto...hehe Then I remember those Apple II's my school had.
    nelson.hsieh
    good artists copy, great artists steal. . .
  19. #19  
    Toby, what's wrong with an OS taking time to learn how to use? It took me a day or two to learn to fully use my iPAQ, and for the extra features PPC 2002 gives you, it's well worth it.

    And as for MacOS, yes it's a great OS, but I use XP Pro, I just can't stand the extra cost of Mac's and the extra time it takes for software to be made available.
  20. #20  
    Originally posted by AzNCoMpUtAnErD
    You should join us my friend, the freedom fighters, and move onto a Macintosh .
    Actually, I'm considering just that around Christmas time probably. I need to get some direct experience with OS X before I make a final decision, though. If it lives up to the hype, I'm switching (unless a miracle brings Linux back into the desktop picture).
    I came to the realization when Windows 2000 came out.
    Actually, I think Windows 2000 is better than XP for my needs, and I'm considering installing it at home in the interim to my final decision.
    I had to choose, glad I chose MacOS. They're both great OS's, but clearly, MacOS is much easier and cleaner to use. Prettier too. Windows 2000 is still great stuff, but no where near OS X. Let's leave it at that...
    I'll reserve judgement until I actually get my hands on an OS X machine (one of the marketing folk has a new G4 on order and I've got second dibs on a test drive).
    I can remember Windows 2.0...now that was ghetto...hehe Then I remember those Apple II's my school had.
    I skipped over the really early iterations of Windows because DOS was enough at the time (Windows 286 and 386 were used on a couple of applications here way back when when I worked during my college summers).
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
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