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  1.    #1  
    So what was so bad about Palms Killswitch? Seems like a prudent move for any app store.

    Windows Mobile 6.5 joins the ranks of iPhone and Android with its own app kill switch

    Earliest this week the internet alarms rang loud with word that Microsoft had added an app "kill switch" to its upcoming Windows Mobile 6.5 platform. Of course, such a kill switch is not unprecedented, as both the Android and iPhone platforms have their own variant. A Microsoft rep recently relayed a message of peace to assuage fears, telling Ars Technica that the vast majority of app rejections won't cause a remote uninstall, and it'll only be used if the app "exhibits harmful behavior or unforeseen effects" -- not that we're entirely assured by the latter scenario, but wording aside, it does echo statements from the aforementioned companies that have so far been very conservative with its use (i.e. we can't recall a single instance of its use). "While we hope to avoid this scenario," he said, "we will make refunds available in such cases." Only time will tell just how trigger happy Microsoft gets, assuming they ever use it. Hey, just be happy we know about it -- remember the last time we were surprised to discover such a feature?
    "When there is no more room in hell, the dead will walk the earth"


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  2. #2  
    I don't like the kill switch idea at all.

    If I have a problem app on my personal desktop, I can personally remove it myself. I prefer the same freedom on my hand held devices. I don't really care at all what their rational is for including the kill switch. I'll take care of my devices without their mothering. Them advising I not use an app is one thing, but jumping into my device and removing something at their own will goes too far for me.

    I prefer to be the decider about what is installed and removed from my property. My property being the hardware.

    I don't have plans to buy from the cloudy app stores that include kill switches. For my Windows Mobile device, there are plenty of other places to buy apps and I hope those other options remain and never try the kill switch model.
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by darnell View Post
    I don't like the kill switch idea at all.

    If I have a problem app on my personal desktop, I can personally remove it myself. I prefer the same freedom on my hand held devices. I don't really care at all what their rational is for including the kill switch. I'll take care of my devices without their mothering. Them advising I not use an app is one thing, but jumping into my device and removing something at their own will goes too far for me.

    I prefer to be the decider about what is installed and removed from my property. My property being the hardware.

    I don't have plans to buy from the cloudy app stores that include kill switches. For my Windows Mobile device, there are plenty of other places to buy apps and I hope those other options remain and never try the kill switch model.
    So it is OK for me to purchase a product and have it on my Pre, then dispute the charge and get the charge reversed and continue to use it because it can't be removed remotely?

    How about another developer stealing all my code and changing some graphics, then selling their product. The users can get refunded, but their illegal copies of my version of an app still lives on their system.

    I could also see it to help eliminate piracy, which WILL be rampant with the WebOS platform.
    Your Pre wants Word Whirl from the App Catalog.

    It told me.
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by sacherjj View Post
    So it is OK for me to purchase a product and have it on my Pre, then dispute the charge and get the charge reversed and continue to use it because it can't be removed remotely?

    How about another developer stealing all my code and changing some graphics, then selling their product. The users can get refunded, but their illegal copies of my version of an app still lives on their system.

    I could also see it to help eliminate piracy, which WILL be rampant with the WebOS platform.
    People who desire to work outside of legal bounds will find ways to disable the kill switch. It certainly will not stop piracy.

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