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  1. billbeme's Avatar
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       #1  
    Hello all!

    I was wondering if anyone would be willing to explain screen resolution to me. With HTC making leaps forward everyday I am eager to understand the advancements.

    If anyone would clarify: QVGA, WVGA, and VGA.

    Also, into which of the above categories do the following fit?
    240x240, 240x320, 320x320, 320x480, 480x640, and above.

    Thank you very much! It is appreciated.

    Bill
  2. #2  
    Quote Originally Posted by Billbeme View Post
    Hello all!

    I was wondering if anyone would be willing to explain screen resolution to me. With HTC making leaps forward everyday I am eager to understand the advancements.

    If anyone would clarify: QVGA, WVGA, and VGA.

    Also, into which of the above categories do the following fit?
    240x240, 240x320, 320x320, 320x480, 480x640, and above.

    Thank you very much! It is appreciated.

    Bill
    QVGA is 320x240 (quarter VGA) (Most WM phones like the HTC Touch)
    WQVGA 400x240) (wide quarter VGA) (Samsung Omnia)
    HVGA is 320x480 (half VGA)(The iPhone, older Palm PDA's)
    VGA is 640x480 (full VGA) (new WM phones like the Touch Diamond)
    WVGA is 800x480 (wide VGA)(The new Touch HD)


    320x320 and 240x240 doesnt really fit in anywhere.

    Resolution and screen size are not really related.

    Surur
    Last edited by surur; 09/10/2008 at 01:03 PM.
  3. #3  
    might as well fill out the entire story...

    it all starts from IBM and display adapters for its IBM PC line.

    First was MDA (monochrome display adapter, no graphics, just 80x25 text).
    Then...
    CGA (color graphics adapter capable of crude graphics, up to 640x200, but only 1-bit (2 colors)).
    EGA (extended graphics adapter, crude color graphics up to 640x350, 16 colors (4-bits))
    VGA (video graphics array, first real analog RGB color at 320x200 (8-bits LUT, 6-bits per gun), or 640x480 with 16 colors)

    then the mods on VGA, maintaining analog RGB:
    SVGA (super-VGA, a bunch of non-standard standards, most often 800x600 with at least 8-bit LUT (256 colors))
    XGA (1024x768, number of colors becomes completely dissociated with pixel resolution, beginning of TruColor (24-bit RGB without LUTs)).
    SXGA (1280x1024)
    UXGA (1600x1200)
    QXGA (2048x1536)

    also "wide" versions of the above, with a W tacked on the beginning, like WXGA, generally a 16:9 rather than 4:3 aspect ratio (e.g. 640x480). The standard 4:3 aspect ratio come from broadcast TV (NTSC) standards.

    Obviously there are limits to what is reasonable in a handheld device. For example, a 640 pixel across a 3" screen is about 84 pixels/cm. Using a viewing distance of 12 inches (30cm) each pixel would subtend about 0.02 degrees, or 1.4 arc minutes. The diffraction limited best acuity of the human eye is about 0.4 arc min, but a more typical real life acuity is around 1.0 arc mins (20/20), with many doing much worse, particularly in low light/brightness/contrast situations. Therefore it is clear that in a handheld device, there is not much point to do much higher than 80-100pixel/cm (250dpi) or 640-800 pixels across for a 3" screen.

    Of then you can always dream of Borg-like display glasses to get more pixels. The human visual system is good for at least 140degrees field of horizontal view (though at diminishing acuity into the periphery). So you *could* argue for a wide screen display technology (e.g. goggles) that had 140*60 (8400) pixels across... which is about what the best movie/film resolutions provide...
  4. billbeme's Avatar
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       #4  
    Thank you both very much for your replies!

    That is exactly the answers for which I was looking.

    If I might follow up with one more: "With the emergence of higher resolution screens, will software compatibility be automatic or will many titles be unusable on VGA screens?"

    Thank you!
    Bill
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by Billbeme View Post
    Thank you both very much for your replies!

    That is exactly the answers for which I was looking.

    If I might follow up with one more: "With the emergence of higher resolution screens, will software compatibility be automatic or will many titles be unusable on VGA screens?"

    Thank you!
    Bill
    Most titles will work, some, especially games,will not. VGA should work with most, but the WVGA and WQVGA may cause problems.

    Surur
  6. billbeme's Avatar
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       #6  
    Thanks! That was all I needed to know

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