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  1.    #1  
    Ok. I don't think there's any doubt in anyone's mind what market Sony's PDAs are going after. They're definitely targeting the consumer who wants all the toys in one slick package. Palm has always been big in the enterprise, and with the announcements made today at TechXNY, they're going after that market vigorously. So where exactly does this leave Handspring? The Springboard interface allows the user to custom tailor the PDA to his liking, but are they trying too hard to be all things to all people, instead of searching for a niche to service well?

    Just some random thoughts.
    It's gotta be weather balloons. It's always weather balloons. Big, fiery, exploding weather balloons.
    -- ComaVN (from Slashdot)
  2. mhc48#CB's Avatar
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    #2  
    [but are they trying too hard to be all things to all people, instead of searching for a niche to service well?
    [/B]
    Handspring's display at PC Expo is one of the largest there this year, plus their name is plastered all over and they even have a retail store in the entrance. By comparison, Sony's Clie is a small part of their display and not very well attended (not to mention the fact that I knew more about it than their staffer).

    Handspring is obviously in it to garner the largest share of the market, and yes... to be all things to all people. But isn't that how you get the largest share??

    BTW, on the floor of PC Expo Handspring's competition is not from Palm, despite the large Palm display area. The real competition is from the iPaq, which is everywhere in vendors' display booths. However, Handspring is at many of those too.
    -Michael-
  3. #3  
    Thanks for the inside info MHCohn! We need to know what's going on in there. Obviously it's not a new HS release/announcement.
    <><
  4.    #4  
    Originally posted by MHCohn
    Handspring is obviously in it to garner the largest share of the market, and yes... to be all things to all people. But isn't that how you get the largest share??
    Yeah. That works sometimes. However I've been on a number of product development teams that have tried to be everything to everybody. None of them have ever survived. Currently I'm working on one now that I worked on a few years ago. Back then they wanted to be everything to everybody as well. They failed and got absorbed into another program. The focus got narrowed, and they achieved reasonable success (meaning the product actually lasted more than a year in the field). Recently, there's been a effort afoot to try and make the product all things to all people again.

    The Edge is a perfect example of this (man, am I asking to get flamed today or what? ). The size and weight are perfect for the typical business person who's looking for a thin, light PDA to carry around in his/her pocket, but since HS wants the Edge to be everything to everybody, they had to add the Springboard to it somehow. Well, there goes your form factor, and potential sales in the enterprise.

    IMHO, a product needs a niche to fill that no one else fills well. These people become the loyal followers that will get you through the tough times. For Palm that's clearly the enterprise. For Sony, that's the multimedia toy nut (reguardless of their attendance at some trade show. Sony has outright said that's the market they're going for in a press release). Has HS figured out what market they're going for? With the Visor and Vdx they seemed to be going after the "best bang for the buck" crowd, which is good, but with each successive product release they seem to be moving all over the map instead of sticking with the plan. This has got to hurt them eventually.

    BTW, on the floor of PC Expo Handspring's competition is not from Palm, despite the large Palm display area. The real competition is from the iPaq, which is everywhere in vendors' display booths. However, Handspring is at many of those too.
    Yeah, I forgot to mention PocketPC's, but I've always seen them as a solution looking for a problem (or is that a problem waiting to happen? )
    It's gotta be weather balloons. It's always weather balloons. Big, fiery, exploding weather balloons.
    -- ComaVN (from Slashdot)
  5. #5  
    Originally posted by sowens



    The Edge is a perfect example of this (man, am I asking to get flamed today or what? ). The size and weight are perfect for the typical business person who's looking for a thin, light PDA to carry around in his/her pocket, but since HS wants the Edge to be everything to everybody, they had to add the Springboard to it somehow. Well, there goes your form factor, and potential sales in the enterprise.

    Please excuse a newbie, but I'm not sure I agree with your comments on the Edge. The typical business person would still use the Edge and say have the sled in their briefcase, pocket, etc. for the rare times it is needed. In the normal run of the day I think one could get by without using the sled at all.

    As well, it gives users who don't really use springboards too often (but do use them sometimes) an option for a slimmer, trimmer PDA.

    IMHO the biggest problem with the Edge is the positioning of the IR port. Why put it where 90% of the population would be holding the darn thing?
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by Cyros
    IMHO the biggest problem with the Edge is the positioning of the IR port. Why put it where 90% of the population would be holding the darn thing?
    1) Where else would you put it?
    2) What percentage of your PDA use time is spent w/ the IR port? w/ me, it's prob around 2%. I can handle having it down there.
  7. #7  
    Originally posted by dietrichbohn


    1) Where else would you put it?
    2) What percentage of your PDA use time is spent w/ the IR port? w/ me, it's prob around 2%. I can handle having it down there.
    Just looking for something to gripe about!
  8. #8  
    Originally posted by Cyros
    Just looking for something to gripe about!
    Ah, well in that case:

    1) The flip lid tends to wobble, there's a spring inside so it makes a barely perceptible noise as it does so.
    2) It hurts itself (mine too )
    3) Rattlin' Stylus
    4) Low Slung IR port (irony...)
    5) Button "feel" seems to be degrading, not as clicky as they once were
    6) I have to resize my tappads
    7) People keep calling it a tuna can, or not as good as the M series, or expandible in a stupid way
    8) Not enough accessories.
    9) It doesn't respond to "Go-Go Gadget Brain!"
    10) No reset pin in the stylus

    ...All in all, it's the best Mono PDA, IMHO!
  9. #9  
    sowens wrote:
    Recently, there's been a effort afoot to try and make the product all things to all people again.


    I'm not sure how Handspring exemplifies this effort. The Prism and Edge represent two distinctly different markets, while the Platinum, Deluxe and Solo represent three different budgets. Try to make a single product for all demographics, like most Pocket PCs, would be a better example of trying to be all things to all people.

    The Edge is a perfect example of this (man, am I asking to get flamed today or what? ).

    Of course. And since you asked . . .

    The size and weight are perfect for the typical business person who's looking for a thin, light PDA to carry around in his/her pocket, but since HS wants the Edge to be everything to everybody, they had to add the Springboard to it somehow. Well, there goes your form factor, and potential sales in the enterprise.

    In the 14 months I owned a VDX, I probably had modules (backup and modem) in the Springboard slot fewer than 10 hours total. Now I keep the EM2 in my Prism all the time, but I'm hardly the business user profile. There are plenty of people who don't make extensive use of the Springboard slot, even if it's indispensible when it is needed. So for these people, the thin form factor remains intact 99% of the time.

    While the Edge was probably intended for professionals, it's not really targeted for the "enterprise" market. The Edge has more image value than fuctionality for companywide LANs. And Donna Dubinsky counterintuitively pointed out that there really is no handheld enterprise market, beyond the anecdotal level. PDAs aren't budgeted for or deployed to employees in substantial numbers like laptops are.

    With the Visor and Vdx they seemed to be going after the "best bang for the buck" crowd, which is good, but with each successive product release they seem to be moving all over the map instead of sticking with the plan.

    That's how I felt about the Platinum: not enough differentiation from the VDX to be perceived as a unique product. Anyone geek enough to care about improved screen contrast, a newer OS, and a 33MHz processor is probably going to want more RAM above all, which wasn't provided.

    It's obvious that the Edge coveted the Palm V market, but did a poor job of it aesthetically, IMO (the plastic rim; the squarish, frontally flat design; and especially the external stylus clip), even if it's the one PDA you can confidently leave in your back pocket.

    One point that never seems to come up in discussions about slowing handheld sales and overstock problems is: how many average users really see the need to upgrade? All handhelds, not just PPCs, are solutions looking for problems. Unlike VC members and other insiders, I have yet to see a Joe Sixpack user anxious to move on to this year's Shiny New Thing. As much as I hate the m100, every m100 user I've met is extremely happy with it, because it does exactly what it's intended to do: keep appointments, contacts, memos and tasks -- in one small package.

    I think Handspring just needs to consolidate its low end, then lower prices across to board to move overstock: have one $125 Visor, a $200 Platinum, a $275 Edge and a $350 Prism.
  10. #10  
    Hey! I have an idea....let's bash the edge!!!! j/k

    Oddly enough, I find the edge to be the most attractive pda out there (minus the included flip cover). I detest the flare at the botton the V and m50x series. I've helped Handspring sell a couple to people upgrading from a Vx because of screen contrast, speed, and USB. Springboard was hardly a selling point (though a few were intrigued with the backup module).
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  11. #11  
    ****-richardson wrote:
    Hey! I have an idea....let's bash the edge!


    Impossible, if it's as indestructable as you say it is.
  12. #12  
    Originally posted by Gameboy70
    Impossible, if it's as indestructable as you say it is.
    lol

    Doesn't mean we can't bash it. It just means it won't break when bashed.
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  13. #13  
    Handspring, whats that? is what some people might say in the future. but to get kinda back to the subject, does anyone think handspring will last much longer than another year, or in the other case, does anyone think handspring will become the number one pda seller like palm use too be. i personally think that handspring will succed if they make a handheld with at least some of the features i posted in my signature in less than 6 months.and if they dont im sure many people will start to seriosly doubt handspring.

    thanks,
    robert
    "Few women admit their age. Few men act theirs."
    "The sum of the intelligence on the planet is constant, but the population is increasing"
    "I am not a vegetarian because i love animals; I am a vegetarian because I hate plants.-- A. Whitney Brown"
  14. #14  
    This has been discussed ad nauseum. But most people could care less about all (maybe some) the features in your signature. I think Handspring is here to stay. That is why I am going to invest in their stock now that it is low. Handspring and Sony are the only two companies that are making compelling and innovative Palm OS devices right now.


    Originally posted by robert sibell
    Handspring, whats that? is what some people might say in the future. but to get kinda back to the subject, does anyone think handspring will last much longer than another year, or in the other case, does anyone think handspring will become the number one pda seller like palm use too be. i personally think that handspring will succed if they make a handheld with at least some of the features i posted in my signature in less than 6 months.and if they dont im sure many people will start to seriosly doubt handspring.

    thanks,
    robert

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