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  1.    #1  





    You see them just about everywhere. You can find them at sporting events, graduations, parties, church socials, school events and just about anything deserving of a picture. It’s the person with their camera phone in action. Years ago it was the video camera popping up everywhere but they seem to be well out numbered by camera phones these days.



    But are these tiny digital cameras worthy of such excitement? Are they more of a novelty than a legitimate camera? Many are VGA quality (about .3 megapixels) and have plastic lenses that are scratched or smudged with a greasy thumb print that enter the photography arena handicapped by design. Advancements in technology have pushed these tiny cameras along the evolutionary path but can they go beyond their novelty and become a convenient alternative to a stand-alone camera?

    Read on for a history of your Camera Phone, how it works, and pointers for taking better shots!



    Read more at http://www.wmexperts.com/articles/ho...y_legit_y.html
  2. ammaralo's Avatar
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    #2  
    I have a Sprint Touch, and the camera on this thing is terrible.
    I think it is due to the lens and not the camera itself. There is no way to focus when taking closeup pictures. At least the 6700 had that focus slider thing on the back.

    Is there anyway to improve pictures through software?
  3. #3  
    Is there anyway to improve pictures through software?
    To a point. Software won't be able to make an out of focus picture sharp as a tack but it may reduce the blur where you can see what's going on.

    One of the challenges with most camera phones focus is that they are fixed focused at about four feet. The camera has a small aperature which allows your depth of field (area in focus) to be from that four foot point to infinity. This will prevent close ups being in focus when you move closer.

    Give the GIMP software a try or download the trial version of Adobe's Photoshop Elements.
  4. #4  
    So how about doing HDR with our camera phones? ;-)

    Great post. There is certainly an "art" to getting great shots on these devices, but you can do lots of great things if you know how to manipulate those variables you mention.
  5. #5  
    The problem with HDR on camera phones is the lack of exposure control. I would imagine it would be concievable if you could control the aperature and shutter speed of the camera. And mount the camera to a tripod and use the timer to eliminate any camera shake.

    Interesting thought though....
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by coppertop View Post
    The problem with HDR on camera phones is the lack of exposure control. I would imagine it would be concievable if you could control the aperature and shutter speed of the camera. And mount the camera to a tripod and use the timer to eliminate any camera shake.

    Interesting thought though....
    lol, I was pretty much being sarcastic, but thanks for the quite accurate & thoughtful response

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  7. rasti's Avatar
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    #7  
    Ive compared two photos, one taken with a LATEST smartphone: The HTC TyTN (2 mpx), and an EARLY old digital camera: The Canon S100 (2 mpx)
    The photos on the camera are very good while the ones on the smartphone SUCKS. The resolution are the same, but the problem is not the lens.
    The problem is the technology of the sensor.
    While te cameras use CCD sensors, the phones uses cheaper, and less battery hungry CMOS sensors.
    So dont expect good quality shots in a phone, even in an 8 megapixels model....
    http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/question362.htm
  8. #8  
    Hate to break it to you but most digital cameras use CMOS sensors. Older digital cameras did utilize the CCD and manufacturers went to the CMOS for a number of reasons including the power issue Rasti mentioned.

    I found that the image quality issues present in camera phones aren't necessarily attributed to one factor but a number of factors. Your Canon S100 has a variable focus, multi-element lens that will do wonders to improve an image. The one difference in the two sensors that will have an impact on image quality is the size. On the phone, you'r packing 2mp into a sensor probably half the size of the Canon's.
  9. #9  
    I have to agree with Rasti though - picture quality on camera phones still lag enormously behind the equivalent resolution stand alone camera.

    Surur
  10. #10  
    I have to agree with Rasti though - picture quality on camera phones still lag enormously behind the equivalent resolution stand alone camera.
    No arguement here. Going into this article I felt that a camera phone made for a better paper wieght than camera. But as I learned more about these tiny cameras, I started to see that while I'll never replace my DSLR with my BlackJack II camera, these tiny cameras can be useful at times.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by coppertop View Post
    But as I learned more about these tiny cameras, I started to see that while I'll never replace my DSLR with my BlackJack II camera, these tiny cameras can be useful at times.
    I agree. When my normal camera runs out of juice, I do not hesitate to grab my phone camera. Better to have some record than no record at all.

    Also the HTC Kaiser/Tilt has one great feature which my camera does not- the panorama mode. Its great for grabbing a wide-screen view of the scene which much closer approximates what our eyes see than a normal aspect picture. I wont bore you with one of my holiday snaps, but I'll post a great example I saw, taken with a kaiser.


    Here's a great thread with many more examples. It seems the main way to get the most out of these CMOS cameras is lots and lots of light.

    http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=371647

    Surur
  12. #12  
    Due to the law of phycise the tiny censor and lens will always have much worse dynamic range, noise level and resolution than a $100 P&S camera. I am guessing 3 generations behind. The question is are you willing to put up with the quality of 15-20 year ago.

    Camera phones need to improve blogging and sharing features, not the quality IMO.
  13. #13  
    I'd love a phone that I could use to take quality photos, but such a device isn't likely, now or in the future. More pixels isn't the only issue. A good camera has well-designed, quality optics and an iris diaphragm so it can be stopped down or opened up as needed to compensate for brightness. The stop-down also affords depth of field and sharpness. Good lens elements have sophisticated coatings to control glare. Add image stabilization and automatic focus, and then the imager can do its job well. And don't forget a flash.

    With the emphasis on tiny size, I can't see cell phones ever having enough space for a good lens, and any mechanical parts aren't going to like being bounced around in pockets with the phone.

    Jay
    Jay Gross
    TreoCentral writer
    Unlocked GSM Treo 650, Sprint Treo 650, drowned Sprint Treo 700P, Treo 700w, and a crimson Treo 680 (yeah!), plus a red Centro
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by jaygross View Post
    With the emphasis on tiny size, I can't see cell phones ever having enough space for a good lens, and any mechanical parts aren't going to like being bounced around in pockets with the phone.

    Jay
    I'm sure in South Korea or Japan you can find some cameras with phones attacked


    Surur
  15. #15  
    I was surprised at the technology that is being developed for camera phones from image stabilized sensors to sensors capable of handling more megapixels.

    I still believe that the optics will be the key to improving camera phones. You have surveillance cameras not much bigger than camera phones with quality optics so it's only a matter of time before someone can incorporate such a lens on a phone camera in an economical manner.

    I agree that I'll grab my Canon DSLR without giving the BJII camera a second thought, but I will admit that camera phones have progressed beyond thier novelty status.

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