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  1.    #1  
    If you've got access to the Chronicle of Higher Ed, go here:

    http://chronicle.com/free/2001/06/2001062102t.htm

    Otherwise, Here are some quotes:

    "If I ask a question in class, all the students stop thinking and turn to watch the student squirm," says Mr. Junkin, a physics professor at Erskine College, in South Carolina. [...]

    So Mr. Junkin, who is also the college's dean of learning and technology, developed his own computer program that allows him to send out a question from a laptop at the front of the room to the whole class. Using oversized cell phones -- those with personal-digital-assistant features -- his students pick up the question and choose or scribble out their best answer with tiny styluses.

    After a few moments, when the answers come back to Mr. Junkin's laptop, he knows who understands the day's topic and who doesn't, and he gets an instant sense of how he should alter his lesson plan before he continues the lecture.

    Craig Kinley, a director of engineering and network operations for Sprint, won't offer financial details about the deal, but he says that the phones retail for about $400. He says that his company will monitor the students' cell-phone use over the next year to determine whether the venture is worthwhile.
    Cool!

    update: The new Kyocera retails at 500, not 400. Maybe this is the old one? The article doesn't give much more detail on the specific phone used. I do think that classroom integration is exciting though. The more the merrier!
  2. #2  
    Depending on the deal he got with those phones, they might be better served using a visor solo with the wireless ethernet module.

    Either way, it's a good idea.
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  3.    #3  
    Originally posted by ****-richardson
    Depending on the deal he got with those phones, they might be better served using a visor solo with the wireless ethernet module.
    I know they had to put up a "Temporary Cell tower," Here's all they will say:
    Under that deal, the college would get the use of free cell phones, and the cell-phone companies would get an opportunity to cultivate young customers.
    Either way, it's a good idea.
    Agreed.
  4. #4  
    Appearently, a similar project is under way at the Chemistry Dpt. of the University of North Carolina, Wilmington. They use HP Jornadas 690 + 720 for "interactive" Q+A as well as manipulating chemical structures etc. in their courses. The study was appearently seed-funded by a publisher who wanted to test their electronic version of a classical chemistry textbook. Pretty Cool!!!
    for more details check out http://aa.uncwil.edu/numina/

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