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  1. #141  
    One of the great things about the iphone for developers is that every iphone will have the App Store icon. Meaning EVERY iPhone user will have the ability to buy and download apps right to the device over either wifi or the cell network.

    There will be alot of impulse buys of software with people just browsing around the App store.
  2. #142  
    Quote Originally Posted by mobileman View Post
    One of the great things about the iphone for developers is that every iphone will have the App Store icon. Meaning EVERY iPhone user will have the ability to buy and download apps right to the device over either wifi or the cell network.

    There will be alot of impulse buys of software with people just browsing around the App store.
    I know on some of the WAP software stores for Windows Mobile you have to buy it and download it on your device. If you want to trial it, you have to go to the desktop web to send an SMS link/download/install it. Would be very helpful to reduce those impulse buys if you could download the trial before you agree to buy it.

    It is always a pain to get a refund once you realize the application is nothing like you hoped it would be.
  3. #143  
    You are incorrect about my background. I designed microprocessors for 10 years at a startup, Sun, and AMD, and have a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. I've written software for many operating systems, including WM, palm and iphone, as well as windows, unix, and mac; I've written probably at least a million lines of C and C++ code for these systems. You don't have "a lot of experience" with technology, because anyone with such experience would understand some of the things below.

    I am not a long-time fan of mac; I never owned a mac (other than an experimental one for work) until late last year. I am typing right now on my windows xp laptop. I have two windows xp servers, and two linux servers.

    The reason I argue with you is because you don't know what you're talking about.

    1) you never heard of newton, and implied that palm somehow invented a lot of things that existed before palm. .Anyone with your claimed technological experience would know something about the history of the PDA market.
    2) you stated that mac software must somehow be "cleared" by apple. This is a completely wrong assertion, and I can't even imagine why you wou think that.
    3) your statements regarding what is open source and what is not open source are completely bizarre. Anyone with your supposed technological experience would know about posix, bsd, etc.
    4) you don't understand why there is less software for platforms that have fewer owners, which shows a basic lack of understanding of the free market
    5) you stated that OS X offers fewer services to the ISV market than windows.
    6) you stated that apple was somehow frequently a step behind windows in features. Again, I've already listed many of the huge apple innovations, that anyone with your supposed experience would know.

    Many of the items listed above are so obviously wrong that anyone with your purported experience would know that.

    I frequently disagree with some people on here (Surur :-), but Surur at least knows what he's talking about and is informed about the topics he posts. You honestly have no idea what you're talking about; this would be fine, but you state things as facts instead of opinions. You tell us about things that apple did wrong ("they force you to get their permission before selling mac software! eek!") that are completely wrong. You tell us about things windows did right that are completely wrong.

    What microsoft did great was package enough good ideas from other people together in a uniquely practical and inexpensive package to get an early lead. Then they leveraged this in various ways (legal and illegal) to grow this lead, and focus on the enterprise and business markets. They wisely maintained backward compatibility. They put in things like preemptive multitasking (though not real great until NT) long before Mac (but long after unix, etc.) Up until XP, they generally did a good job (windows ME notwithstanding). They failed to deal with the internet and security issues rapidly enough, and they stagnated. Windows Vista has some good ideas in it, but they left out all the brilliant things they promised, and took too long to deliver.

    However, there is no major functionality or features gap between windows and os x, so you really should disavow yourself of that idea. Marketshare is marketshare, and that's the reason there are more apps for windows than os x. OS X is just as customizable as windows, in my brief OS X experience; one difference is that in OS X there's less reason to try and customize most things, because things are generally pretty nice as they are.
  4. #144  
    Interesting article on Ars about a Windows programmer who recently switched to OS X:

    http://arstechnica.com/articles/cult...from-apple.ars

    Blog-baity quote (And no, I don't think it's Dilger using a pseudonym):

    Windows is dying, Windows applications suck, and Microsoft is too blinkered to fix any of it—that's the argument. The truth is that Windows is hampered by 25-year old design decisions. These decisions mean that it's clunky to use and absolutely horrible to write applications for. The applications that people do write are almost universally terrible. They're ugly, they're inconsistent, they're disorganized; there's no finesse, no care lavished on them. Microsoft—surely the company with the greatest interest in making Windows and Windows applications exude quality—is, in fact, one of the worst perpetrators.

    The unfortunate thing about this is that there is a company that's not only faced similar problems but also tackled them. Apple in the mid-1990s was faced with an operating system that was going nowhere, and needed to take radical action to avoid going out of business. And so that's what Apple did. Apple's role in the industry has always been more prominent than mere sales figures would suggest, but these days even the sales numbers are on the up. There are lessons to be learned from the company in Cupertino; I only hope they will be.
    Editor-in-chief, iMore
    Executive producer, Mobile Nations
    Co-host, Iterate, Debug, ZEN & TECH, Ad hoc, MacBreak Weekly
    Cook, grappler, photon wrangler.

    http://www.imore.com
    http://www.mobilenations.com
    http://twitter.com/reneritchie
  5.    #145  
    What a snob (isnt that just another way to say Apple user?)

    Thank God his Jobness saved him from clashing colours on the Windows platfrom.

    Surur
  6. #146  
    Yeah, he should have n(u)t(t)ed up and suffered through it, the way an XP user does with those primitive screen painters and anti-user interfaces! Total snob!
    Editor-in-chief, iMore
    Executive producer, Mobile Nations
    Co-host, Iterate, Debug, ZEN & TECH, Ad hoc, MacBreak Weekly
    Cook, grappler, photon wrangler.

    http://www.imore.com
    http://www.mobilenations.com
    http://twitter.com/reneritchie
  7. #147  
    If you read the actual article, it makes some good technical points about the quality of the SDK. It is true that programming for windows without constantly having to check the meaning of arguments for every single function call is quite unlikely for an inexperienced programmer. The calling and naming conventions vary from API to API, almost like each was written by a different team with no communication.

    From my brief cocoa experience I can confirm that the cocoa sdk is much more orthogonal and self-consistent: once I got the basics of dealing with controls, figuring out how to deal with animation or sql was pretty simple. Part of that may be because objective-c lends itself better to this sort of thing than does c++/c (particularly due to differences in memory management). But as a long-time c++/c coder and objective-c newbie, I definitely find cocoa refreshing.

    It's also nice that it includes a lot of STL-like stuff in a very organic way.
  8. #148  
    Based on the sheer amount of feifdom'ery, pettiness, isolationism, and self-investment (you want feature A, well you'll have to take my feature B and my dumb friend Steve's features C and D to get it!), it's miraculous they get anything working. However, each written with no communication is probably not far from what happened...
    Editor-in-chief, iMore
    Executive producer, Mobile Nations
    Co-host, Iterate, Debug, ZEN & TECH, Ad hoc, MacBreak Weekly
    Cook, grappler, photon wrangler.

    http://www.imore.com
    http://www.mobilenations.com
    http://twitter.com/reneritchie
  9. #149  
    Editor-in-chief, iMore
    Executive producer, Mobile Nations
    Co-host, Iterate, Debug, ZEN & TECH, Ad hoc, MacBreak Weekly
    Cook, grappler, photon wrangler.

    http://www.imore.com
    http://www.mobilenations.com
    http://twitter.com/reneritchie
  10. #150  
    Dilger is a little bit nuts, though.
  11. #151  
    Quote Originally Posted by cmaier View Post
    You are incorrect about my background. I designed microprocessors for 10 years at a startup, Sun, and AMD, and have a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. I've written software for many operating systems, including WM, palm and iphone, as well as windows, unix, and mac; I've written probably at least a million lines of C and C++ code for these systems. You don't have "a lot of experience" with technology, because anyone with such experience would understand some of the things below.

    I am not a long-time fan of mac; I never owned a mac (other than an experimental one for work) until late last year. I am typing right now on my windows xp laptop. I have two windows xp servers, and two linux servers.

    The reason I argue with you is because you don't know what you're talking about.

    1) you never heard of newton, and implied that palm somehow invented a lot of things that existed before palm. .Anyone with your claimed technological experience would know something about the history of the PDA market.
    2) you stated that mac software must somehow be "cleared" by apple. This is a completely wrong assertion, and I can't even imagine why you wou think that.
    3) your statements regarding what is open source and what is not open source are completely bizarre. Anyone with your supposed technological experience would know about posix, bsd, etc.
    4) you don't understand why there is less software for platforms that have fewer owners, which shows a basic lack of understanding of the free market
    5) you stated that OS X offers fewer services to the ISV market than windows.
    6) you stated that apple was somehow frequently a step behind windows in features. Again, I've already listed many of the huge apple innovations, that anyone with your supposed experience would know.

    Many of the items listed above are so obviously wrong that anyone with your purported experience would know that.

    I frequently disagree with some people on here (Surur :-), but Surur at least knows what he's talking about and is informed about the topics he posts. You honestly have no idea what you're talking about; this would be fine, but you state things as facts instead of opinions. You tell us about things that apple did wrong ("they force you to get their permission before selling mac software! eek!") that are completely wrong. You tell us about things windows did right that are completely wrong.

    What microsoft did great was package enough good ideas from other people together in a uniquely practical and inexpensive package to get an early lead. Then they leveraged this in various ways (legal and illegal) to grow this lead, and focus on the enterprise and business markets. They wisely maintained backward compatibility. They put in things like preemptive multitasking (though not real great until NT) long before Mac (but long after unix, etc.) Up until XP, they generally did a good job (windows ME notwithstanding). They failed to deal with the internet and security issues rapidly enough, and they stagnated. Windows Vista has some good ideas in it, but they left out all the brilliant things they promised, and took too long to deliver.

    However, there is no major functionality or features gap between windows and os x, so you really should disavow yourself of that idea. Marketshare is marketshare, and that's the reason there are more apps for windows than os x. OS X is just as customizable as windows, in my brief OS X experience; one difference is that in OS X there's less reason to try and customize most things, because things are generally pretty nice as they are.

    Are you still going on about how stupid I am? let it die... and no, i am not always right. however you also seemed to miss a few of my points entirely... but it does not mean I am going to clutter up a forum bashing you about being misinformed on certain topics... and out right being rude and calling you an *****. Im sorry, but that lacks alot of tact, sir.

    I did do some research regarding the open source statement I made. I found this on the apple website:

    http://www.apple.com/opensource/

    What my friend who was a new MAC user said was there was no open source therefore no possibility for intrusion. I never really researched it to figure out what it was he meant. Should have know better than to take the word of a bank auditor.

    What I did read in thier FAQ regarding security is Apple alerts you to incoming downloads and such. Which Windows account control does this as well as MS Live OneCare (best security app i have ever had for Windows, seemless and quietly does it's thing.) So I am still not seeing why, just because Apple does not need "virus software" they are a more secure OS. If that was the case I would think large enterprises would be flocking to it?
  12. #152  
    PS - regarding newton vs my palm, i was talking in terms of pda phones... not just PDA's. When I looked up Newton on Wikipedia, it did ring a bell after seeing a quick jpg of it. Given I was a poor college kid/grad in those years, 93 to 98, a PDA was a luxery and therefore not exactly on my radar.

    In looking at Palm's PDA history, their first release was 1996 with the Pilot serios. So yes Newton did predate them by 3 years in terms of PDA.

    http://www.palm.com/us/company/corporate/timeline.html

    In terms of PDA Phones, Palm Smartphones first emerged in July of 2003. Which predates the iPhone by 4 years. So that is what I was referrencing when I meant Palm the early pioneer of this share of the market. The very first smart phone I ever saw in action was a Palm Treo, my boss had the 380 (i think that was the model number.) My boss 1 year later had the 600.

    Please if there is a PDA smart phone that predates the Treo, let me know. I would be interested to see what else was available at the time.
  13. #153  
    Quote Originally Posted by Rene Ritchie View Post
    Vey interesting article. I was watching on G4 a couple weeks ago about the rise/decline of Apple, post the Apple IIe era. (It was a marathon, which also included Atari, Colecovision, Arcade Games, and a few others that I cant think of at the moment.) However their report totally matches with this guys recollection of Apple's history.

    I tried to see if they had it on demand on their www.g4tv.com website. No dice.
  14. #154  
    Quote Originally Posted by djchad View Post
    PS - regarding newton vs my palm, i was talking in terms of pda phones... not just PDA's. When I looked up Newton on Wikipedia, it did ring a bell after seeing a quick jpg of it. Given I was a poor college kid/grad in those years, 93 to 98, a PDA was a luxery and therefore not exactly on my radar.

    In looking at Palm's PDA history, their first release was 1996 with the Pilot serios. So yes Newton did predate them by 3 years in terms of PDA.

    http://www.palm.com/us/company/corporate/timeline.html

    In terms of PDA Phones, Palm Smartphones first emerged in July of 2003. Which predates the iPhone by 4 years. So that is what I was referrencing when I meant Palm the early pioneer of this share of the market. The very first smart phone I ever saw in action was a Palm Treo, my boss had the 380 (i think that was the model number.) My boss 1 year later had the 600.

    Please if there is a PDA smart phone that predates the Treo, let me know. I would be interested to see what else was available at the time.
    Not only were there smartphones that predated the treo, but at least a few of them used palm software. For example, Samsung made a couple, as did kyocera. And none of these had "threaded chat."

    As for your other posts, I still have no idea what you are trying to say.
  15. #155  
    Among the reasons apple is more secure:

    1) having a small market share, hackers see little relative benefit to attacking it
    2) not being as hated as microsoft, hackers are less motivated to attack it
    3) unlike most versions of windows, most mac users do not run as "administrator" (on unix/mac this is called "root").
    4) unlike windows, programs don't install their crap into central directories like the system directory. Each program looks to the user like a single file but is actually its own "folder" containing lots of files. If something gets mangled, it affects only that program. Attackers can't easily just go rooting around in a central place and hitting everything.
    5) no registry to attack/mangle
    6) no "self-modifying code" as is still supported on windows for backward compatibility
    7) frameworks are written in objective-c, which makes memory management/protection easier/more organic than c++/c-based code.
    8) not designed to be perfectly backward compatible with ancient software. Windows has to keep a lot of scary behavior/crufty API's around in order to run old stuff, and the more APIs you have, particularly old ones, the more avenues for attack.

    1 and 2 are the most important.
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