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  1. #21  
    yes the Xlink is a strong alternative to the Dock-n-Talk... highly recommended... I use one to replace the silly Verizon Landline service in my house. There is a version of the Xlink that will integrate a real landline into the mix.

    The other choice is a cordless phone that has a BT link builtin. Uniden, AT&T and Panasonic all make these types of cordless phones. The Xlink (or DnT) is a better choice if you need to drive a regular POTS phone (as I did in my house, it drives the whole house POTS wiring), but the BT cordless phones are probably better if you don't need that since you don't have to spend an extra $130-150 for the special box.
  2. #22  
    My concern in getting one of these BT phones is that the Treo BT has always been so flaky... I have a headset that I can't use because of flaky BT so why would it be safe to assume that a BT phone would be any better?
    Grant Smith
    A+, Net+, MCPx2, BSIT/VC, MIS

    eNVENT Technologies
    Use your imagination.
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    Sprint HTC Evo 4G

    DISCLAIMER: The views, conclusions, findings and opinions of this author are those of this author and do not necessarily reflect the views of eNVENT Technologies.
  3.    #23  
    The X-Link also suffers from three major limitations.

    1. BT - The one advantage my Treo has inside is if I get a signal, I can use BT headset so I can do hands free and do other things while talking....like typing or using tools while tech support is on the line.

    2. The desktop phone(s) must be plugged into the back of the unit. It doesn't use existing house wiring, except for the incoming phone line. If you have phone in kitchen, den, living room, study, etc...it would seem each one has to be plugged into the back of the thing.

    3. Typical family has 2.3 children.....that means the ability to handle 4.3 cell phones.

    Here's some of the alternatives that I have tossed around last couple of weeks:

    a) The lack of phone docking standard is probably the biggest hurdle to this one. Putting a 2.5" x 1" "slot" on the back of the desktop / wall phone might work with the slot's function being to slide a manufacturer specific docking port / adapter into. IOW, a sort of "Treo Cradle" type of thing (base could be slim as it wouldn't have to be designed not to topple over).

    Arrive at home or office, pop Treo which leaves screen in full view and accessible. When in cradle, calls ring on one or both (Cell and desktop), Treo charges, can sync with PC....ya can even use VoiceDial. And also you still have BT available.

    b) Another idea would be putting SIM slots in desktop / wall phones which would work in most of the world.. The problem however might be that towers would always be seeing and having to handle / track 2 signals for ever user. Don't see telcos liking that as the sell call forwarding as a service which basically accomplishes the same thing. PITA though is turning it on and off.

    c) Perhaps an automatic "call forwarding whenever phone in cradle" feature. Could even have cradles with ID numbers such that with multiple cradles, you could have different numbers. Treo software would detect ID number and you could assign a number to each cradle you use.

    d) This is the simplest. How about a regular Treo cradle with a phone plug. If Treo is on cradle, it sends the call to the phone at the other end of the cord.

    e) Have ya seem that new LCD monitor which has an auxilliary screen ? It's like a 19" monitor and it has a small 3" or so LCD panel mounted on a hinge on the right side. My idea....replace that LCD screen with a clip on phone mount. WIth IP based phone systems such as:

    http://www.altigen.com/Phone-Systems...usinesses.html

    this makes a world of sense.
  4. #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE View Post
    The X-Link also suffers from three major limitations.

    1. BT - The one advantage my Treo has inside is if I get a signal, I can use BT headset so I can do hands free and do other things while talking....like typing or using tools while tech support is on the line.

    2. The desktop phone(s) must be plugged into the back of the unit. It doesn't use existing house wiring, except for the incoming phone line. If you have phone in kitchen, den, living room, study, etc...it would seem each one has to be plugged into the back of the thing.

    3. Typical family has 2.3 children.....that means the ability to handle 4.3 cell phones.
    I don't understand your listing of these "3 major limitations"...
    1) BT ??? Xlink *is* a BT device. It links to a BT cell phone (up to 3 of them).

    2) Xlink *can* drive a whole house of desktop phone wiring. I am currently using it that way right now. I have 6 standard POTS phones distributed around the house all driven by one Xlink box which then links to 1-3 BT cell phones. Works great.

    3) The Xlink handles 3 BT cell phones. Not really sure why that's not enough... Are you really are going to have more than 3 BT cells phones all within 30 feet of the Xlink box ? I think 3 is more than enough. I really doubt that each of the 2.3 children want their own individual cell phones linked to the Xlink so that the other 3.3 family members can pick up and listen in to their private calls...

    Basically, I don't think you really understand what the Xlink box does or what it can do...
  5.    #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by neurocutie View Post
    I don't understand your listing of these "3 major limitations"...her 3.3 family members can pick up and listen in to their private calls...

    Basically, I don't think you really understand what the Xlink box does or what it can do...
    Basically, I don't think you really read carefully enough or understood what I typed and maybe the Xlink can do things but the manufacturer's web site has wrong information.

    1) BT ??? Xlink *is* a BT device. It links to a BT cell phone (up to 3 of them).
    Go back and read what I typed. The question is not whether the Xlink is a BT device but how many BT connections can be handled by any given cell phone at one time.

    One of the reasons I chose a wired GPS is that the Treo is not capable of "seeing" two BT items at the same time. If I used a BT GPS, I couldn't take calls over my BT headset at the same time. Wired GPS and BT headset works fine. Are you saying the same principle doesn't apply here ?

    That **is** what I was talking about. If I can't use my BT headset at the same time as my my GPS, how can I use my BT headset with a BT Xlink connection at the same time.

    All 5 phones here are already using their bluetooth connection, both to sync phone and appointment books with PC's and for hands free headsets. On these phones I can use both a PC sync via BT and a headset w/o changing my BT profile.

    If my phone is set to "see" my headset, wouldn't I have to manually change my BT profile for it to "see" the XLink ? And if it is set to see the Xlink, wouldn't that mean it's precluded from seeing the headset until I change the profile back ? Like the GPS, a wired connection between the phone and cell phone eliminates the dual BT problem hence the reason why I would prefer a wired connection.

    2) Xlink *can* drive a whole house of desktop phone wiring. I am currently using it that way right now. I have 6 standard POTS phones distributed around the house all driven by one Xlink box which then links to 1-3 BT cell phones. Works great.
    The web site shows / states that the "desktop phone" must be plugged into the back of the X link unit. That may not be true but that's what it shows on the site. And as for running it through house wiring, don't quite understand how you stop all the other extensions from ringing. Who wants 5 people's phones ringing at their desk ? I don't want to be disturbed by the phone ringing for my oldest son at 1 am in the morning. I don't want my offcie desk phone ringing at 3 pm asking if my 14 year old wants to "come out and play". I don't want to be bothered by my wife's chatty cathy friends calling at 7:30 am asking if my wife will be coming down to the bus stop.

    3) The Xlink handles 3 BT cell phones. Not really sure why that's not enough... Are you really are going to have more than 3 BT cells phones all within 30 feet of the Xlink box ? I think 3 is more than enough. I really doubt that each of the 2.3 children want their own individual cell phones linked to the Xlink so that the other 3.3 family members can pick up and listen in to their private calls...
    The reason it is not enough is that there are 5 cell phones in our house, none of which can get a signal inside the house every one of which use BT headsets or other BT links to sync with PC's. Remember, if ya read back in the thread, you will see that the idea is to dump land line service completely. So if I decide that 3 people will have access to the Xlink, then how to the other 2 people communicate with the world ?

    BTW, who's the "other 3.3 family members " ? 2.3 kids + mommy + daddy = 4.3 ..... how'd we get to 5.6 (2.3 + 3.3) ?

    I have one simple need. When I sit down at my desk, I want to have the convenience of a desktop phone.....if I am not at my desk, or if I need to type down information while on the phone, I'd like to be able to work "hands free" slip on my BT headset, and type away with two hands. When I am sitting at my desk, I don't want 4 other peoples calls coming through to my phone....I don't have the time nor the inclination to be their secretary.

    The XLink's limitations don't allow me do those things.
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE View Post
    Basically, I don't think you really read carefully enough or understood what I typed...
    You typed:
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE View Post
    The X-Link also suffers from three major limitations.
    But the things you list aren't really limitations at all or, like BT, are part of the intended design... what you are really saying is that the Xlink isn't the device for you, fine. But to say that a BT box has a major limitation in that it uses BT is plain silly...
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE View Post
    And as for running it through house wiring, don't quite understand how you stop all the other extensions from ringing.
    ??? But that is what you asked for when you said:
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE View Post
    It doesn't use existing house wiring, except for the incoming phone line. If you have phone in kitchen, den, living room, study, etc...it would seem each one has to be plugged into the back of the thing.
    .. you said that it was a "major limitation" that the Xlink couldn't drive the house wiring so that phones in the kitchen, den, etc, couldn't be driven... well the Xlink *can* do that... but now it seems you don't want that... (you can't have it both ways...)
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE View Post
    Who wants 5 people's phones ringing at their desk ? ...
    The reason it is not enough is that there are 5 cell phones in our house...
    Here's is where it really seems you want it both ways... 1) You want to drive phones via the house wiring -- well that can only mean ONE or at most TWO simultaneous phone conversations, but 2) You don't want the 5 phones to get at the Xlink (which only does three), but then 3) You claim that only supporting 3 BT phones is a major limitation, *even though* you clearly state that you can't imagine wanting to have many phones ring the ONE house line.
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE View Post
    BTW, who's the "other 3.3 family members " ? 2.3 kids + mommy + daddy = 4.3 ..... how'd we get to 5.6 (2.3 + 3.3) ?
    If there are 4.3 people in the house, and ONE gets a call, then the other (4.3 - 1) == 3.3 people have the (possibly unwanted) ability to also pick up and listen in on that call...
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE View Post
    I have one simple need. When I sit down at my desk, I want to have the convenience of a desktop phone.....if I am not at my desk, or if I need to type down information while on the phone, I'd like to be able to work "hands free" slip on my BT headset, and type away with two hands.
    The XLink's limitations don't allow me do those things.
    Ok...
    1) The Xlink's "limitations" have nothing to do with it not working for you under all the conditions you list. Indeed, as you noted earlier, its the Treo's limitations in handling multiple BT connections, combined with you not wanting to manually swap BT connections that prevent you from doing what you want, at least in *any* BT solution. It's not the Xlink's fault at all.

    2) I'd suggest (and did before) a desktop phone with a builtin BT linking function as an alternative, but again, the Treo's limitations will prevent a smooth usage the way you'd want.

    3) Its now obvious that driving house wiring isn't at all what you'd want, so I don't know why you said that that was a major Xlink limitation (which it isn't), when it isn't even relevant to your application.

    4) But you don't want a wired solution either. I think the way most people handle what you're talking about is using the speakerphone function instead of a BT headset.... So use either the Xlink+desktop phone with speakerphone, or a BT desktop phone with speakerphone. Then you can have the desktop phone function, and if you need a handsfree situation, use the speakerphone.
  7.    #27  
    Like the Palm OS thread, a lot of quoting, while saying nothing:

    It's simple.....
    -
    1. A specific goal was outlined.
    2. The Xlink was recommended to meet that goal.
    3. It can't.

    End of story.

    The desired solution is to work with a Treo, work with a Treo headset....these are the givens. You read a snippet of a paragraph, add in a lot of inferences and then act as if the snipped taken out of context means something, it doesn't. For example:

    -BT isn't part of my intended design but you keep shoving it up as a solution....BT is not wanted....period.

    -House wiring is not "what I asked for".....I made a statement as to what is on the Xlink web site. By stating that something is on their web site does not imply that I "asked for" it.

    Here's is where it really seems you want it both ways.
    -No I only want it one way, my way, not Xlinks way.

    1) You want to drive phones via the house wiring
    No I don't. read the 1st sentence. The limitation which I stated was "The desktop phone(s) must be plugged into the back of the unit." That is the problem, not the hosue wiring.

    2) You don't want the 5 phones to get at the Xlink (which only does three)
    I don't want the 5 cell phones to get to anything other than their own respective desktop phone. I want my cell phone to ring on my desk phone.....I want my oldest son's cell phone to ring on the desktop phone in his room....I want the 2nd oldest son's phone to ring in his room....getting the picture ?

    3) You claim that only supporting 3 BT phones is a major limitation, *even though* you clearly state that you can't imagine wanting to have many phones ring the ONE house line.
    BT is a deal killer. Why keep saying that I can do what I want with BT when I have repeatedly said I AM NOT INTERESTED IN A BT / WIRELESS SOLUTION.

    All I need is a simple solution. One can easily buy a desktop phone with two inputs. A Treo cradle with a RJ45 plug would do the trick. The house wiring plugs into one line of the two port phone. Another line goes from Treo cradle to desktop phone. Done deal.

    The Xlink's "limitations" have nothing to do with it not working for you under all the conditions you list. Indeed, as you noted earlier, its the Treo's limitations in handling multiple BT connections, combined with you not wanting to manually swap BT connections that prevent you from doing what you want, at least in *any* BT solution. It's not the Xlink's fault at all.
    Next time I am asked to design a new roof for a building, maybe I will follow your approach and tell them to knock the whole building down and start all over so it can support the roof design you happen to favor. A solution is not a solution unless it worlk with what you already have.

    3) Its now obvious that driving house wiring isn't at all what you'd want, so I don't know why you said that that was a major Xlink limitation (which it isn't), when it isn't even relevant to your application.

    I'd suggest (and did before) a desktop phone with a built in BT linking function as an alternative, but again, the Treo's limitations will prevent a smooth usage the way you'd want.
    I don't know how many different ways to say it. I AM NOT INTERESTED IN ANY TYPE OF BT OR WIRELESS SOLUTION. Any solution which involves BT will not be considered as meeting the consideration criteria. I am the one spending the money, I will decide the criteria if you don't mind.

    3) Its now obvious that driving house wiring isn't at all what you'd want, so I don't know why you said that that was a major Xlink limitation (which it isn't), when it isn't even relevant to your application.
    The only thing that is obvious is that you didn't read what I wrote. The "limitation" has nothing to do with house wiring. The limitation that I stated was "The desktop phone(s) must be plugged into the back of the unit." Again, that may not be true but that is what it says.

    Look here:

    http://www.xlinkgateway.com/bttn.html

    The image clearly shows running a line from the house wiring to the XLink (non issue) and it also clearly shows a "telephone cord" between the Xlink and the "telephone" .... hello THIS IS THE ISSUE. Can you not understand my not wanting to run telephone cords from the Xlink box to 5 different places. I have 5 separate floors in my house. It's post and beam construction which will require drilling though beams and columns which are up to 8" thick and made of 200 year old Locust Wood (aka ironwood).

    4) But you don't want a wired solution either. I think the way most people handle what you're talking about is using the speakerphone function instead of a BT headset.... So use either the Xlink+desktop phone with speakerphone, or a BT desktop phone with speaker phone. Then you can have the desktop phone function, and if you need a handsfree situation, use the speakerphone.
    I generally find it real hard to use a speaker phone when I am 20 feet from my desk. This morning I was on the phone with tech support for my plotter .....tough following their instructions over the speaker phone when I need 2 hands free and the phone is 20 feet away. Though most times I prefer a desktop phone while at my desk, sometimes I am not at my desk ..... sometimes I just wanna kick back in my chair which puts me too far from the speaker phone I have now for the person on the other end of the line to hear me.

    Can you please stop trying to shoehorn your chosen solution into my situation ? Your situation and reasons for choosing your solution are your own. Mine are my own. Your solution does not fit the qualifying criteria. I am trying to find a place to buy gasoline and you keep coming back with why I shoulda bought a vehicle with a diesel engine.
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE View Post
    It's simple.....
    -
    1. A specific goal was outlined.
    2. The Xlink was recommended to meet that goal.
    3. It can't.

    End of story.
    Look that's fine... great even. And had you just said that, I probably wouldn't have even said anything.

    Yes, you're the OP, but these discussions become public discussions, often greater in scope than the OP. The discussion had veered to the DocknTalk and then the Xlink (brought up by others), and all I was confirming was that the Xlink was a great device -- and the DnT and Xlink are almost always discussed together since they are the same kind of device.

    What I had a problem with is you characterizing "major limitations" of the Xlink that were either completely false (can't drive house wiring), or nonsensical (a purpose-built BT device is *supposed* to use BT, so how can using BT be a "major limitation"?).
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE View Post
    The "limitation" has nothing to do with house wiring.
    Well, nevertheless that *is* what you said...

    In any case, the *fact* is that the Xlink *can* drive house wiring. This is a point of (apparently) new information. The desktop phone can *either* be plugged into the Xlink *or* into the house wiring along with the Xlink itself, as long as the landline signal is not running in the same pair. This is identical to what all VOIP devices do to drive house wiring (e.g. Vonage).
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE View Post
    Look here:
    http://www.xlinkgateway.com/bttn.html
    The image clearly shows running a line from the house wiring to the XLink (non issue) and it also clearly shows a "telephone cord" between the Xlink and the "telephone" .... hello THIS IS THE ISSUE. Can you not understand my not wanting to run telephone cords from the Xlink box to 5 different places. I have 5 separate floors in my house.
    Again, if you understood what the Xlink does, you would understand that that is *not* the only way to use the device and it *can* drive the house wiring... and you *don't* need to run separate wiring to each desktop phone...

    But lets forget about the house wiring issue, since it is apparent now that it has no role in your situation...
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE View Post
    Can you please stop trying to shoehorn your chosen solution into my situation ?
    I'm really not trying to shoehorn a solution... I agree with you that Xlink won't do what you want (but frankly I think nothing exists that will...). Mostly I was trying to state that some of these characterizations of Xlink "limitations" were incorrect.
  9. #29  
    Jack,

    I have to agree with her response... XLink uses BT as part of its solution. That will work for me, and it may not for you.

    I use vonage right now, and my wife and I are considering killing that $20 a month. I know that makes me sound cheap, but we're whittling away at expenses and I got interested in the XLINK, so I posted on TC to get some feedback.

    We're currently using a phone (uniden 5.8ghz) that only requires the base unit to be plugged into the router, and it wirelessly links to the other handsets around the house. My wife and I want the ability to come home, dock our phones and have either of our phones ring on the distributed home phones. XLink allows the different phone numbers to use different ring tones, so we'll know which line the call is coming in on without having to answer.

    I don't think there's a solution to what you want -- one dock, calls coming in on your phone number rings a specific phone in your house, calls coming in on someone else's phone number rings a different phone...

    We have a different requirement -- we don't want to have to be in a certain room or have to carry around our cell phones everywhere we go in the house at all times.

    My only concern about buying the XLINK is that our home phone number has been shared out so much and is on so much documentation that I don't want that number to be distributed too far. Yes, I put it on the do not call list, etc, but it's a concern. I'll definitely write back if I give it a shot.
  10.    #30  
    Quote Originally Posted by ricochet View Post
    I have to agree with her response... XLink uses BT as part of its solution. That will work for me, and it may not for you.

    I use vonage right now, and my wife and I are considering killing that $20 a month. I know that makes me sound cheap, but we're whittling away at expenses and I got interested in the XLINK, so I posted on TC to get some feedback.

    We're currently using a phone (uniden 5.8ghz) that only requires the base unit to be plugged into the router, and it wirelessly links to the other handsets around the house.....
    I have a stack of wireless phones in a box in the garage. The problem with everyone I ahve used is they don't take well to phone switches. So if you have one of those doohickeys that let you double up a fax. modem and phone line, the wireless base stations tend to wreak havoc on them. I have a Uniden set a Siemens set and one more whose name I can't remember.

    Right now I have 6 land lines coming in, 4 of which are active. One is the home line, the other three are for my home office. The switch lets me use that last line for all three uses. I'd like to dump three of them and rely more on cell phones. I'd keep one land line which is essentially a backup for all fax, voice and on line communications. We have 30Mbps cable model service it it's gone down so then I use dial out. The cell phones will work of an in building boost system so we'd even lose those in a power outage.

    BT might be a nice option for some, but if it's kills the use of a headset, that's too big a sacrifice for me. A deskphone is a lot easier to hold on your ear than a cell, which is it's primary draw.....but not having to hold a phone and use a headset is something I wanna do about 1/3 the time. Giving up a BT headset is therefore too big of a negative.
  11. #31  
    What is the bluetooth range for detecting your phone ringing and making your home phone ring? At home I often don't have my phone on me and tend to miss calls. Could this solve this?
  12. #32  
    Quote Originally Posted by 155 View Post
    What is the bluetooth range for detecting your phone ringing and making your home phone ring? At home I often don't have my phone on me and tend to miss calls. Could this solve this?
    Not sure I understand your question... are you still refering to the Xlink box ?

    If so, the Xlink can link up with a BT phone at least 10 feet away (maybe up to 30 feet, never tried), then it would ring a "home phone" if that phone is connected to the RJ11 port of the Xlink, either directly, or via the house POTS wiring. The general idea is that when you get home, you plop your cell phone on the counter close to your Xlink (where ever you might like: kitchen, office, bedroom, etc).
  13. #33  
    I've gone to the web site and read through the user guide but missed something or perhaps it's not covered in what I read.

    1. I understand that up to three Cell phones can be connected via BT (Line 1, 2 or 3).

    2. I understand that if ANY of those connected cell phones ring the connected wired phone(s) will ring with a distinctive tone to identify the cell phone (1,2 or 3).

    3. I understand that if you pick up the wired phone you can call out on any of the cell phones (defaults to the lowest number phone, but can be forced to select 1, 2 or 3).

    What happens when a cell phone call is active on the XLink (Cell 1 for instance) and another call comes in on cell 2 or 3?

    Does the call ring as call waiting on the XLink enabled wired phone, does it only ring on the Cell phone or something else?

    Neat device, it actually is something that I might consider picking up for home to share with my wife. My cell phone service is a little spotty in the house so it would be handy.
    Palm Pro -> PIII Upgrade Card -> Palm Vx w/ Minstrel-Omnisky -> Tungsten | T -> Treo 650 -> Centro
  14. #34  
    Three questions....

    (1) Sorry for being so dense, but why weren't the Dock-N-Talk or XLink systems good enough for the OP again? Because of the number of lines he wants going into the system??

    (2) What are the differences between Dock-N-Talk & XLink??

    (3) As I understand it, the Dock-N-Talk doesn't make connectors for Palm devices (755p, in particular)... but it still works with bluetooth connection?!?
  15. #35  
    Bump!
  16. #36  
    Can I get another bump, please?
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