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  1.    #1  
    Dear iPhone Hecklers,

    Effective January 1, 2008, the US Department of Transportation has imposed new regulations on lithium ion batteries for air passengers in both carry-on and checked baggage.

    Too Bad, So Sad, Don't Care, Eat It!

    All those arguments about how the iPhone couldn't use a second battery were lame-*** anyway considering it had twice the battery life of every other smart phone out there.

    signed,
    iPhone User
  2. #2  
    Archie, effective immediately there are new rules about cutting and pasting articles from other sites. Please at least include a link to avoid charges of plagiarism (unless your name is John Martellaro of course)

    New Rules for Air Passengers with Lithium Ion Batteries
    by John Martellaro, 4:00 PM EST, January 3rd, 2008

    Effective January 1, 2008, the US Department of Transportation has imposed new regulations on lithium ion batteries for air passengers in both carry-on and checked baggage.
    http://www.macobserver.com/article/2008/01/03.11.shtml


    Quote Originally Posted by archie View Post
    Dear iPhone Hecklers,

    Effective January 1, 2008, the US Department of Transportation has imposed new regulations on lithium ion batteries for air passengers in both carry-on and checked baggage.
    Of course if you go to the more informative original article you can see you can still carry a space battery in your carry-on baggage, but of course Archie, you may not have been able to understand. Its always advisable to ask for help in interpreting new government regulations, especially if you have a reading problem.

    You may bring spare lithium batteries with you in carry-on baggage see our spare battery tips and how-to sections to find out how to pack spare batteries safely!
    http://safetravel.dot.gov/whats_new_batteries.html

    Surur
  3.    #3  
    Please don't call the cops! Please don't call the cops!




    Dude, you are one uptight... so and so.

    I figured people would be able to tell it was cut from an article by the journalistic news style of the date and "actions imposed".

    Sh!t. You know what. Yesterday I posted a bulleted list cut right from Google's developer site. I should probably take that down too.


    Anyway; you better make up your mind. You can't chastise me for what I DID write while at the same time chastising me for the very same thing which I DID NOT write.

    I can't believe you watch me so closely, like a hawk.



    Dun, da dunnnnn, Dun Da dunnnnn! surur, on patrol. Dun, da dunnnnn, dun da dunnnnn!
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by archie View Post
    Please don't call the cops! Please don't call the cops!

    Dude, you are one uptight... so and so.

    I figured people would be able to tell it was cut from an article by the journalistic news style of the date and "actions imposed".

    Sh!t. You know what. Yesterday I posted a bulleted list cut right from Google's developer site. I should probably take that down too.
    Thats why a little thing called quotation marks (and on this site quotation boxes) were invented. You dont know this?

    Quote Originally Posted by archie View Post
    Anyway; you better make up your mind. You can't chastise me for what I DID write while at the same time chastising me for the very same thing which I DID NOT write.

    I can't believe you watch me so closely, like a hawk.
    I dont recall the original article saying "Too Bad, So Sad, Don't Care, Eat It!". That must have been your own inspired contribution. And of course your interpretation of the article was wrong to start with...

    Quote Originally Posted by archie View Post
    Dun, da dunnnnn, Dun Da dunnnnn! surur, on patrol. Dun, da dunnnnn, dun da dunnnnn!
    Archie, I always look forward to your posts. They amuse me to no end.

    Surur
  5. #5  
    Regardless of the always-nauseating back and forth between you two, these new regs will be a pain in the rear for travelers. Taping up the terminals with electrical tape and individually bagging each? And US airport screeners are going to be knowledgeable enough to understand the differences between a lithium-metal and a lithium-ion battery, the former of which can be placed in checked-in baggage while the latter cannot? The frog in this beaker that keeps on getting water drops dripped onto it is, one day soon, going to reach out and slap the guy with the dropper in his hand.
    Last edited by lifes2short; 01/04/2008 at 09:05 AM. Reason: Adult words removed, k?
  6. #6  
    Or, we could all just read the comments at the end of the article:







    " It seems that nearly everyone has missed the point, perhaps because they didn't actually read and check out the rules. Consider this:

    Quote
    Under the new rules, you can bring batteries with up to 8-gram equivalent lithium content. All lithium ion batteries in cell phones are below 8 gram equivalent lithium content. Nearly all laptop computers also are below this quantity threshold.


    According to that page, 8 gram equivalent is about 100 watt-hours. For example, batteries for the 17" MacBook Pro are 68 watt-hours and they're the largest in Apple's line. You can carry any number of these. Read the rules. All they ask is that they be packed so that nothing can bridge their contacts. (That's also why installed batteries are not of as much concern.) For example, you could put them in plastic bags. Thus, you can carry 100 spare batteries for your MacBook, if they would fit in your carry-on bag and you wanted to tote them around. You could watch an entire season of Law & Order without a problem.

    Batteries for digital cameras and camcorders are even smaller, though their capacity usually isn't expressed in watt-hours. To take an example, the batteries for my Canon 30D, a "prosumer" DSLR, have about 1400 mAh at 7.4v. If one assumed that the voltage would be constant (it actually decreases as the battery is discharged), that would be about 10.4 watt-hours, way under the 8 gram-equivalent=100 watt-hours threshold. So, the guest with the Nikon D2xs probably had nothing to be concerned about. In addition, many camera batteries come with a little cover for the area with the contacts. If not, put them in a plastic bag.

    Quote
    You can also bring up to two spare batteries with an aggregate equivalent lithium content of up to 25 grams, in addition to any batteries that fall below the 8-gram threshold. Examples of two types of lithium ion batteries with equivalent lithium content over 8 grams but below 25 are shown below.


    Shown are two large batteries, one a 130 watt-hour "universal" external battery for laptops, the other a large 160 watt-hour battery used by AV professionals. Anyone have one of those? It weighs about 2.5 pounds, a bit much to hang under your digital SLR or on the back of your camcorder, and costs nearly $400. (It is for professional video cameras and lights.) Those would fit under the rule, up to a maximum of about 300 watt-hours. If you use batteries like that, check with the manufacturer for their exact lithium equivalent.

    Re: the comment about shipping batteries. When batteries are commercially shipped, they are packed to ensure that nothing can bridge their contacts. That cannot be guaranteed with checked-in baggage.

    Quote
    For a lithium metal battery, whether installed in a device or carried as a spare, the limit on lithium content is 2 grams of lithium metal per battery.

    Almost all consumer-type lithium metal batteries are below 2 grams of lithium metal. But if you are unsure, contact the manufacturer!


    Lithium metal batteries, as opposed to lithium ion batteries, if what I read is correct, are non-rechargeable batteries like lithium AA batteries. Again, 2 grams would be about 25 watt-hours, way more than any AA battery can pack. (They're more like 2-3 watt-hours, at most.)

    You won't be able to carry spare batteries in checked baggage, but can in carry-on.

    - Checked baggage can easily be hand-checked to ensure that the batteries are properly stowed.

    - A fire in the passenger area would actually be easier to handle than one in the cargo hold, as flight attendants can focus their efforts on the small source. In the hold, the crew can only apply the general fire extinguishing systems, which, apparently, are not sufficient to extinguish a small but very hot source.

    It does help to read the rules and do a little research. That would avoid the "Chicken Little" remarks, not to mention the inevitable conspiracy theories."
  7. #7  
    Wow, I feel like such a lurker. I joined a month ago and that was my first post.
  8. #8  
    To know the Rules isn't "chicken little", it's simply having read and comprehended what the DOT has specified. What I stated earlier is clearly referenced.

    http://safetravel.dot.gov/how_to.html

    http://safetravel.dot.gov/tips.html

    What do you think airport screeners will tell passengers who have 2 or more batteries in a zipped bag? You don't think they will allow you to board until you've separated the batteries, do you? You also don't think that airports will now be in the business of passing out free baggies to all in need. Or, offering free electrical tape to cover the terminals? Or, do you?

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