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  1.    #1  
    So, my time with the Curve has come to a close. It's a dirty little secret of the Smartphone Round Robin, but I'm glad that I get to use the iPhone again for a day. I've airlifted the 8310 Curve off to Jennifer of TreoCentral, and Kevin is shipping me the Windows Mobile-based AT&T Tilt. I get to keep my SIM card firmly seated in the iPhone for a full day!

    It's been an interesting week with the Curve, but the limitations of it started to wear pretty thin on me as the week progressed. Once the newness of the curve wore off, I started eyeing my iPhone a lot more. I've been looking forward to shipping the Curve off so I could use my iPhone. Looking to the future, I began -- shudder to think -- looking forward to the Tilt. But there are some strong redemptive features to the platform.

    Read more at http://www.phonedifferent.com/2007/1...t_article.html
  2. #2  
    Great summary on your experience with the Curve. It basically stated exactly how I thought an iPhone user would feel about Blackberrys.
  3. #3  
    Nice summary. Wish I had this one this morning when a friend asked about the Curve, he would have a better viewpoint than mine on it.
    MMM | AntoineRJWright.com | BH | Jaiku

    Moved on to Symbian, but still will visit from time to time.
  4. #4  
    Yes, great summary Mike! I'll be getting to know the Curve this weekend. Going to be interesting for sure.
  5. #5  
    Excellent summary, I was glad to see that you gave the Curve a fair shake there and compliment-dig part was totally fair, basically breaking it down to what a BB user would use the device for..it excels at, but for something more maybe the iPhone is the better choice, once again great write and thank you for your perspective.
  6. #6  
    There's a flip side to that coin, though. There always is: I think that the hardcore BlackBerry users will be entranced by the iPod Touch. Or, if they need a personal cellphone in addition to their enterprise-managed BlackBerry, the iPhone is not going away. I don't know how long the affinity will last; part of me expects each company to begin viciously tearing pages out of each other's playbook, but it's definitely there now.
    I'd expect that too, but there are limits and (as I think this round robin will end up showing) it's not possible (with current technology) to have a device that's best at everything. Some of those limits are set early in the design process and are completely immovable. Form factor is perhaps the most obvious - you can't have both a permanently exposed physical QWERTY and a big screen covering most of the front of the device, etc - but there are others too, like choice of (non-text) input method (finger, stylus, d-pad, scroll wheel), that have profound effects on how the device operates and what it's best for.
  7. TimWilmath's Avatar
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    #7  
    It will be interesting to see if everyone goes back to the phone they started with, or switches to one they tried!
  8. #8  
    good article. like the poiont about WM wittleing down BB's advantage. They are going at it fully loaded, and, eventually, they will get it.
    da Gimp

    Please note: My spelling sucks and I'm to lazy to check it.
  9. dckiwi's Avatar
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    #9  
    Some really good points. I know exactly what you mean about using a phone as a quick point of reference when you need to look up a useless bit of trivia; much faster than booting up the laptop.

    Unfortunately, some browsers make this a frustrating chore...
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by TimWilmath View Post
    It will be interesting to see if everyone goes back to the phone they started with, or switches to one they tried!
    Well, the last week of the Round Robin we get to "come home again" to our own devices. I'm pretty sure I'll stay a WM guy, but as I said in my iPhone article, the iPhone has pretty much secured a permanent spot in my gear bag as a movie machine.
  11. #11  
    I agree with the hit on throwing Options in almost every nook and cranny of the UI, but witht he exception of the extraordinary iPhone screen, I just don't see teh adavantage over the Curve (and I've had both AND Treo, WM5, WM6, etc.). Even web browsing is overblown - the Apple screen is gorgeous, but browsing on a handheld screen is never going to be a satisfying experience; it's a convenience at best.
  12. nerdstrap's Avatar
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    #12  
    Blackberry needs to convert themselves to a software company and create a cross platform BB messaging app that will run on any phone. Hardware is better left to Htc, Apple and Samsung...
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by nerdstrap View Post
    Blackberry needs to convert themselves to a software company and create a cross platform BB messaging app that will run on any phone. Hardware is better left to Htc, Apple and Samsung...
    I think BlackBerry makes some really great hardware. I bet it wouldn't take much for them to build a killer Windows Mobile smartphone with no touchscreen, for example.

    Quote Originally Posted by dstrauss View Post
    [...] web browsing is overblown - the Apple screen is gorgeous, but browsing on a handheld screen is never going to be a satisfying experience; it's a convenience at best.
    You're right about mobile browsers not replacing a desktop screen. Usually, when you're trying to read a web page on a mobile device, it's not necessarily about convenience -- it's because you need to find information. If you're out and about, you might need to find information right then and there. At that point, a malfunctional web browser is very bad.

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