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  1.    #1  
    Ok, I know this is a Visor board, but I figured people here might be interested. Just spotted the new Agenda PDA over on Slashdot and had to check it out. You can see all the details at http://www.agendacomputing.com/. Looks very slick and stylish. Has an Ice-like outer casing, runs Linux on a 66 MHz MIPS CPU, 8MB RAM, 16 MB Flash RAM. Expansion capability by attaching to the cradle connector like the Palm devices. And all for only $249. Linux in the palm of your hand! how much geekier can you get

    check out the /. discussion at http://slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=0...16&mode=thread

    there's an especially neat thread about setting the DISPLAY variable and having your workstation display on the PDA or vice versa

    still, i think i'll stick with my platinum for now.
    -----BEGIN GEEK CODE BLOCK-----
    Version: 3.12
    GS d-(+) s: a C++ UX++++V++S++ P+>+++ L>+++ E+>++ W++ N++(+++) o? K? w !O !M V-- PS PE Y+ PGP++ t++ 5++ X++ R+ tv++ b++(+++) DI++++ D+ G++ e+++>++++ h--- r+++ y?
    -----END GEEK CODE BLOCK-----
  2. #2  
    I signed up to preorder one a long time ago. They couldn't get it out on time so I bought a visor.

    One cool thing you can do: install the Linux version of the Palm syncing software. You then can then sync you Palm/visor to your Agenda.
  3. #3  
    I think the Agenda is going to be a flop, and will only attract Linux geeks. Have you seen the screenshots of the OS and software on Agenda's site? It looks horrible! Big clunky KDE-like buttons, large ugly drop-down menus, UNIX style fonts, over-beveled UI...no one is going to want this thing. Except maybe Unix admins!

    I've read several reports that the Agenda is extremely slow, which brings me to my primary question: If it's a bad idea to stuff Windows on a PDA, why is it suddenly ok for Linux to assume that role? They both seem like an improper fit to me.

    Thanks Agenda, but I'll stick with Palm!
  4. #4  
    Foo:

    Exactly. Linux is bad enough (GUI-wise) on the desktop...smashing it on to a PDA only makes it worse.

    That said, the great thing about Linux is that it is really independant of the GUI. So, in theory, someone COULD come along and write a really nice GUI for it.
    We're all naked if you turn us inside out.
    -David Byrne
  5. #5  
    Ha! Looks like I was right on the money. The Agenda is indeed a piece of crap, and will die as a flop!

    Check this review out:

    http://www.brighthand.com/html/other...nda_page1.html
  6. #6  
    That's to bad. But I'm glad I didn't buy one.

    Originally posted by foo fighter
    Ha! Looks like I was right on the money. The Agenda is indeed a piece of crap, and will die as a flop!
  7. #7  
    Originally posted by foo fighter
    Ha! Looks like I was right on the money. The Agenda is indeed a piece of crap, and will die as a flop!

    Check this review out:

    http://www.brighthand.com/html/other...nda_page1.html
    The message that you can take from the brighthand review is that, they normaly are prety kind to devices even if they suck, but this one steve couldn't even say anything nice about them... that is sad. IT's a shame to, because i thought that this might turn out good.

    sam
    Sam Kleinman

    PocketPCThoughts.com
    CollectiveArts
    Free-ePress
    Musings of a Teal Artist
    CollectiveArts TechMusings

    "Everybody don't like something and we all don't like you." -- Richard Thompson, Hard Luck Stories
  8. #8  
    Now I don't think the review sounded that bad, especially for a first Linux PDA. Of course it's not going to take over the handheld world (at least in its current form), but Agenda deserves a lot of praise for trying something different out. They must have known what deep water they were getting into beforehand.
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by dalamar70
    Now I don't think the review sounded that bad, especially for a first Linux PDA. Of course it's not going to take over the handheld world (at least in its current form), but Agenda deserves a lot of praise for trying something different out. They must have known what deep water they were getting into beforehand.
    THe title was negative, " A faulty Agenda" and he only gave it one star.... read the reveiw of a device that you can tell steve didn't like (the edge comes to mind) and you'll see that he was kind to it, but there was none of that in the agenda review
    Sam Kleinman

    PocketPCThoughts.com
    CollectiveArts
    Free-ePress
    Musings of a Teal Artist
    CollectiveArts TechMusings

    "Everybody don't like something and we all don't like you." -- Richard Thompson, Hard Luck Stories
  10. #10  
    More to the story. It turns out that the early models sent to the press were beta models. Check out this article at PDAGeek: http://www.geek.com/news/geeknews/20...0409005286.htm
    He even references the Brighthand review.
    Sven

    If at first you do succeed, try not to look astonished.
  11. #11  
    To me, the Brighthand review was a little too short. Some of the flaws mentioned didn't seem too big or important, like the startup screen, a bad case, and not being able to run more than SIX programs at a time. Six! That seems pretty good to me for a $250 handheld device. (How does WinCE or a PPC do I wonder.)

    Of course there are a lot of bad things listed, like taking 4-5 seconds to start apps, no syncing software available yet, and inferior handwriting recognition (wonder if you can hook up a keyboard). So although this isn't something you might recommend to your dad (and Agenda shouldn't avertise it as such), a Linux-based PDA has potential for hardcore gadget guys or Linux folks... pending reviews of actual units.
  12. #12  
    Some of the flaws mentioned didn't seem too big or important, like the startup screen
    Actually, I find that a pretty big flaw. It shows that the company does not understand how a PDA OS should behave.

    Having to watch it boot up, and then forcing the user to take actions to get to the main screen is a completely unecessary burder placed on the user.

    And this is the problem Linux, in general, faces. It is still a very 'closed' OS in that only those hard-core enough to deal with it's inadequate GUIs are able to use it.

    This will change, eventually, but until it does, I do not see Linux, in any form, being a consumer level OS.
    We're all naked if you turn us inside out.
    -David Byrne
  13. #13  
    Originally posted by homer


    Actually, I find that a pretty big flaw. It shows that the company does not understand how a PDA OS should behave.

    Having to watch it boot up, and then forcing the user to take actions to get to the main screen is a completely unecessary burder placed on the user.

    And this is the problem Linux, in general, faces. It is still a very 'closed' OS in that only those hard-core enough to deal with it's inadequate GUIs are able to use it.

    This will change, eventually, but until it does, I do not see Linux, in any form, being a consumer level OS.
    Hopefully soon, Agenda is planing to release a VR5, as a big sister to the vr3, and this might be beffy enough to be useable.

    sam
    Sam Kleinman

    PocketPCThoughts.com
    CollectiveArts
    Free-ePress
    Musings of a Teal Artist
    CollectiveArts TechMusings

    "Everybody don't like something and we all don't like you." -- Richard Thompson, Hard Luck Stories
  14. #14  
    Originally posted by homer

    Having to watch it boot up, and then forcing the user to take actions to get to the main screen is a completely unecessary burder placed on the user.
    I see this as "minor" from a technical viewpoint -- they should be able to boot directly to the launcher without a lot of modifications.

    I completely agree that this thing isn't your standard PDA -- I think they're just trying to make the smallest full-blown Linux box possible. The startup takes you through the little username and password login screen, and then gives you a blank desktop, a lot like a desktop PC.

    That's all part of the quirky charm of this little device that some people may appreciate, but again they shouldn't be positioning this as a "consumer-oriented" PDA like the Palm... even though they have.
  15. #15  
    Originally posted by homer

    Having to watch it boot up, and then forcing the user to take actions to get to the main screen is a completely unecessary burder placed on the user.
    Apparently, I'm the only one who thought that this bootup procedure only needs to be done the first time you turn it on (or when you lose power/reset). Is it annoying? Yes. But it's -- in theory -- only annoying once.

    I don't think they would have released a PDA that needs to boot up like that every time you turn it on. It's suicide.

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