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  1.    #1  
    interesting read based on some older news but interesting no less, esp on forbes

    WebOS Gets Surprise Second Life in Healthcare - Forbes
  2. #2  
    That is interesting. Who would have known that the 'cheap plastic construction' of the TouchPad would actually be a benefit for such a specialized use? I especially like the discussion on how the openness of the OS is probably the biggest draw here...and that Apple iPads were somewhat problematic since there is little to no ability to customize the interface/OS to maximize usefulness. I hope to hear about such stories more and more often now that webOS is open source. Sure I'd love to see webOS grow in this climate and be an option on future hardware I would use (not in the market for an MRI device, but new smartphones and tablets are possibilities for my needs).

    Good on ya webOS!
    Sent from my slowly diminishing intellect

    I'm just a soul who's intentions are good...oh Lord, please don't let me be misunderstood!

  3. #3  
    yup inspiring news, shame the only source of the touchpad is now ebay.
  4. #4  
    PalmOS is still shipping on some portable barcode scanner products, so it's not surprising that someone has a quirky, specialized use for webOS/Touchpad.
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by greenoyster View Post
    PalmOS is still shipping on some portable barcode scanner products, so it's not surprising that someone has a quirky, specialized use for webOS/Touchpad.
    I was surprised. Not that webOS can be tuned more easily than other OSs to special needs, but that it WAS used...today...well, since the abandonment by HP. This was a particularly encouraging part of the article for me:

    Given the unique requirements of the healthcare field, HP may be on the brink of finding a new niche.

    Holbrook plans to continue to use the TouchPad in clinical trials at Stanford this year and develop more WebOS applications. He already ported one of his apps, a respiratory monitoring device, to a WebOS-powered smartphone, allowing medical personnel to receive critical patient data on a mobile device.
    Sent from my slowly diminishing intellect

    I'm just a soul who's intentions are good...oh Lord, please don't let me be misunderstood!

  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by inertia1 View Post
    It sounds like this article is more about using modified TPs near MRI machines. 99% of healthcare doesn't occur near MRI suites. I guess if one is planning to build custom software and deploy custom hardware then a tablet capable of running an open-source platform may be an advantage.
    I got the impression that, at least part of the system, is aimed at provinging a screen and input for people IN an FMRI machine (feeding input back to a remote PC). Certainly a very specialised case but it's nice to hear that webOS is proving useful in it. I daresay the sharing to a webOS phone was just convenience by the developer rather than a strategic choice, i.e. using the same dev environment.
  7. #7  
    This story is OLD NEWS to those of use who actually read the Articles and Editorials on the front page, but since Forbes picked it up, I guess it's new to a lot of people who ordinarily wouldn't see that...
  8. #8  
    if hp can make 500 windows 7 slates, why not make webOS products in small quantities?

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