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  1.    #1  
    World Net Daily| November 2 2005

    "I don't own a single share of stock!" filmmaker Michael Moore proudly proclaimed.

    He's right. He doesn't own a single share. He owns tens of thousands of shares including nearly 2,000 shares of Boeing, nearly 1,000 of Sonoco, more than 4,000 of Best Foods, more than 3,000 of Eli Lilly, more than 8,000 of Bank One and more than 2,000 of Halliburton, the company most vilified by Moore in "Fahrenheit 9/11."

    If you want to see Moore's own signed Schedule D declaring his capital gains and losses where his stock ownership is listed, it's emblazoned on the cover of Peter Schweizer's new book, "Do As I Say (Not As I Do): Profiles in Liberal Hypocrisy."

    And it's just one of the startling revelations by Schweizer, famous for his previous works, "Reagan's War" and "The Bushes."

    Other examples:

    House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who proclaims her support for unions, yet the luxury resort, the vineyard and the restaurants she partly owns are strictly non-union. While she advocates tough new laws enforcing environmental regulations on the private sector, the exclusive country club she partly owns failed to comply with existing environmental regulations for the past eight years including a failure to protect endangered species.

    Noam Chomsky has made a reputation for calling America a police state and branding the Pentagon "the most hideous institution on earth," yet his entire academic career, writes Schweizer, has been subsidized by the U.S. military.

    Barbra Streisand is another proponent of environmentalism, yet she drives an SUV, lives in a mansion and has a $22,000 annual water bill. In the past, she has driven to appointments in Beverly Hills in a motor home because of her aversion to using public bathrooms.

    Ralph Nader plays the role of the citizen avenger the populist uninterested in wealth and materialism, pretending to live in a modest apartment. In fact, he lives in fancy homes registered in the names of his siblings.
    This is not just a book of "gotcha" journalism, explains Schweizer. He says the dozens and dozens of examples of "liberal hypocrisy" he cites in his book "are of central importance in evaluating the validity and usefulness of liberal ideas."

    "Using IRS records, court depositions, news reports, financial disclosures and their own statements, I sought to answer a particular question: Do these liberal leaders and activists practice what they preach?" he writes. "What I found was a stunning record of open and shameless hypocrisy. Those who champion the cause of organized labor had developed various methods to avoid paying union wages or shunned unions altogether.

    "Those who believe that the rich need to pay more in taxes proved especially adept at avoiding taxes themselves. Critics of capitalism and corporate enterprise frequently invested in the very companies they denounced. Those who espouse strict environmental regulations worked vigorously to sidestep them when it came to their own businesses and properties. Those who advocate steep inheritance taxes to promote fairer income distribution hid their investments in trusts or exotic overseas locales to reduce their own tax liability. Those who are strong proponents of affirmative action rarely practiced it themselves, and some had abysmal records when it came to hiring minorities. Those who proclaim themselves champions of civil liberties when it comes to criminal or terrorist cases went to extraordinary lengths to curtail the civil liberties of others when they felt threatened or just inconvenienced. Advocates of gun control had no problem making sure that an arsenal of weapons was available to protect them from dangerous criminals
  2. #2  
    Schweitzer is on O'Reilly tonight (11/2). Great other examples of this hypocrisy are the Kennedys and George Soros funnelling major $$ overseas to avoid paying taxes and Al Franken touting affirmative action (and calling conservatives racists for negating it) while hiring just 1 minority out of 132 employees!
  3. #3  
    since when does somebody take michael moore serious as a person?
    He seems to be out for controversy and getting it..

    In the process he does ask some interesting questions though..
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  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by ToolkiT
    since when does somebody take michael moore serious as a person?
    He seems to be out for controversy and getting it..

    In the process he does ask some interesting questions though..

    The Democrats took him seriously. They made him a guest of honor at their 2004 convention.
  5. naivete's Avatar
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    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by burnout
    World Net Daily| November 2 2005

    "I don't own a single share of stock!" filmmaker Michael Moore proudly proclaimed.

    He's right. He doesn't own a single share. He owns tens of thousands of shares including nearly 2,000 shares of Boeing, nearly 1,000 of Sonoco, more than 4,000 of Best Foods, more than 3,000 of Eli Lilly, more than 8,000 of Bank One and more than 2,000 of Halliburton, the company most vilified by Moore in "Fahrenheit 9/11."

    If you want to see Moore's own signed Schedule D declaring his capital gains and losses where his stock ownership is listed, it's emblazoned on the cover of Peter Schweizer's new book, "Do As I Say (Not As I Do): Profiles in Liberal Hypocrisy."

    And it's just one of the startling revelations by Schweizer, famous for his previous works, "Reagan's War" and "The Bushes."

    Other examples:

    House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who proclaims her support for unions, yet the luxury resort, the vineyard and the restaurants she partly owns are strictly non-union. While she advocates tough new laws enforcing environmental regulations on the private sector, the exclusive country club she partly owns failed to comply with existing environmental regulations for the past eight years including a failure to protect endangered species.

    Noam Chomsky has made a reputation for calling America a police state and branding the Pentagon "the most hideous institution on earth," yet his entire academic career, writes Schweizer, has been subsidized by the U.S. military.

    Barbra Streisand is another proponent of environmentalism, yet she drives an SUV, lives in a mansion and has a $22,000 annual water bill. In the past, she has driven to appointments in Beverly Hills in a motor home because of her aversion to using public bathrooms.

    Ralph Nader plays the role of the citizen avenger the populist uninterested in wealth and materialism, pretending to live in a modest apartment. In fact, he lives in fancy homes registered in the names of his siblings.
    This is not just a book of "gotcha" journalism, explains Schweizer. He says the dozens and dozens of examples of "liberal hypocrisy" he cites in his book "are of central importance in evaluating the validity and usefulness of liberal ideas."

    "Using IRS records, court depositions, news reports, financial disclosures and their own statements, I sought to answer a particular question: Do these liberal leaders and activists practice what they preach?" he writes. "What I found was a stunning record of open and shameless hypocrisy. Those who champion the cause of organized labor had developed various methods to avoid paying union wages or shunned unions altogether.

    "Those who believe that the rich need to pay more in taxes proved especially adept at avoiding taxes themselves. Critics of capitalism and corporate enterprise frequently invested in the very companies they denounced. Those who espouse strict environmental regulations worked vigorously to sidestep them when it came to their own businesses and properties. Those who advocate steep inheritance taxes to promote fairer income distribution hid their investments in trusts or exotic overseas locales to reduce their own tax liability. Those who are strong proponents of affirmative action rarely practiced it themselves, and some had abysmal records when it came to hiring minorities. Those who proclaim themselves champions of civil liberties when it comes to criminal or terrorist cases went to extraordinary lengths to curtail the civil liberties of others when they felt threatened or just inconvenienced. Advocates of gun control had no problem making sure that an arsenal of weapons was available to protect them from dangerous criminals
    I don't see why you are being political about it. Politicians and activists from both republicans and democrats have done it. In addition to the names you mentioned, there's Donald Rumsfeld, who is the chairman of the board at Gilead Sciences, the patent holder of Tamiflu, currently manufactured by Roche. Then there is Bill Frist, who owns HCA stock before he sold it.
  6. #6  
    If a junkie tells you it's stupid to start using heroin you're not going to believe him?
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by naivete
    I don't see why you are being political about it. Politicians and activists from both republicans and democrats have done it. In addition to the names you mentioned, there's Donald Rumsfeld, who is the chairman of the board at Gilead Sciences, the patent holder of Tamiflu, currently manufactured by Roche. Then there is Bill Frist, who owns HCA stock before he sold it.
    I must have missed the Rumsfeld movie about how evil Gilead Sciences is.

    The hypocrisy is the point, not simply that Moore owns stock.

    I think I do agree though with daThomas (gasp!), that claims of hypocrisy are used by both sides to shut people up rather than to prove any particular point, though. For example - assuming Moore wasn't a nut - would his ownership of Haliburton stock render null and void any criticism he made of the company? It wouldn't make what he said any more or less true, but it would make him less credible as a messenger.
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  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas
    If a junkie tells you it's stupid to start using heroin you're not going to believe him?
    I believe very few things a junkie says. Additionally, we don't entrust junkies with the running of our country (well, most of them anyway); nor do we idolize them in film and print.
    Poor metaphor.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by phurth
    but it would make him less credible as a messenger.
    That's the key. When you are a leader, you should be honest and credible. Unfortunately way too many of our leaders are neither.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by KRamsauer
    I believe very few things a junkie says. Additionally, we don't entrust junkies with the running of our country (well, most of them anyway); nor do we idolize them in film and print.
    Poor metaphor.
    sigh,

    If a smoker tells you to never start smoking cause it's bad for you and addictive, do you not believe him/her?
  11. cardio's Avatar
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    #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas
    sigh,

    If a smoker tells you to never start smoking cause it's bad for you and addictive, do you not believe him/her?
    If a smoker says I do not smoke as he is lighting a cigarette, do you believe him?
  12. #12  
    I heard on an MSNBC talk show yesterday that gov contracts like Halliburton are limited to something like 3.71% profit in their bids for the contract. It turns out that Micheal Moore has earned $30,000,000 MORE off of the Iraq War than Halliburton has. I guess that should be upped with his profits from Halliburton as well then.
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas
    sigh,

    If a smoker tells you to never start smoking cause it's bad for you and addictive, do you not believe him/her?
    Yes, but I believed that previously. If I were a smoker, I woudn't believe him. Try again.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by HobbesIsReal
    I heard on an MSNBC talk show yesterday that gov contracts like Halliburton are limited to something like 3.71% profit in their bids for the contract. It turns out that Micheal Moore has earned $30,000,000 MORE off of the Iraq War than Halliburton has. I guess that should be upped with his profits from Halliburton as well then.
    How so? Is that money from his film?
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by KRamsauer
    Yes, but I believed that previously. If I were a smoker, I woudn't believe him. Try again.
    No.
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas
    No.
    All good things must come to an end, I suppose.
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by KRamsauer
    All good things must come to an end, I suppose.
    Alas, let's hope so.
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas
    Alas, let's hope so.
    Nevah! Patriots will win the next 10 superbowls!
  19. #19  
    For the record, a junkie is a consumer of goods. A stockholder is a pusher of good. To seek profit from that which you publicly denounce as delorable is duplicitous at best (or, I suppose at its worst)
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by KRamsauer
    How so? Is that money from his film?
    Yup.
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