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  1.    #1  
    Many of you already know my Biblical world-view but I'd like to get your thoughts on Disney's efforts. They are trying to market their new Chronicles of Narnia to take advantage of the "christian" market without ostracizing the secular market.

    Sure, I'm a Christian with a captial "C" but I could give a rat's tail (I've reformed my language...) about the "christian" message behind these great C.S. Lewis books. We read them in Mr. Spangler's third grade and I was completely enthralled with them. I can't wait to see what today's effects can do to such a great story. I saw the trailer the other day at the theater and my wife and I can't wait.

    Why can't we just go see a movie without someone trying the "go see it because it's really about Jesus... wink, wink"? (Yes, I'm fully aware of Mr. Lewis' faith and writings)

    C'mon! The Bible is about Jesus. This movie is about a lion who takes names. It's like those who REALLY feel that if they sneak Intelligent Design in the schools, some can be fooled into believing in God. (some dummies on the pro-side believe that and MANY dummies on the anti-side believe it as well)

    Cool effects, epic battles, soaring landscapes, engaging drama = good movie (let's just leave it at that, shall we?)

    Can't a fella just go watch a movie with his best girl anymore???
    Recognizing that I volunteered...
  2. #2  
    I love the books. I also love Lewis' many other books, "Miracles," "The Screwtape Letters," etc.

    It worked for "Passion," and they figured they'd give it a try too. You have to admit, many people just don't go to the movies any more......they're desperate to increase their sales.
    I've heard that polar bear steaks are tough, but maybe if you marinated them in beer they'd turn out all right.
  3. cardio's Avatar
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    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by frankthetoad
    I love the books. I also love Lewis' many other books, "Miracles," "The Screwtape Letters," etc.

    It worked for "Passion," and they figured they'd give it a try too. You have to admit, many people just don't go to the movies any more......they're desperate to increase their sales.
    It is all about the money. There are a lot of people who will not go to the movies unless it has that special lean to it. I agree, instead of using the movies to tell the world of Christ why not use yourself as an example. I like the saying "tell everyone about Christ and His love and even use words when you have to" (action my friend, action is what we need).

    I am excited about the movie, but because of the same reason AlaskanDad mentioned, great story, should be great effects.
  4. #4  
    A good story is, first and foremost, a good story. It needs no other justification. It need not carry a subtext. It may recapitulate our culture but it should have some novelty.

    However, we are, to a very great extent, the stories that we tell ourselves about who we are. It should not surprise anyone that the best remembered people in our culture are our story tellers. C. S. Lewis is in the pantheon of story tellers. Walt Disney has a high place. I am anxious to see the collaboration between C. S. Lewis and Disney's legacy. I look forward to taking the little people in my life to see this film. (I held one seven year-old in thrall when I read him this story in June.) I think that Christmas time is a good time for it to open.
  5. iomatic's Avatar
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    #5  
    Likewise, my eight year-old loves the stories -- though we are by far not Christian. If it's a good story, I don't care about the subtext; we'll draw our own conclusions, thank you very much. Nor do I care about the special effects either. This coming from an art director.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by iomatic
    .......Nor do I care about the special effects either. This coming from an art director.
    I cannot help but wonder what our culture might look like if Shakespeare had Spielberg's tools or Mozart had had a tape recorder.
  7. #7  
    Well, After the Southern Baprtists finally ended their boycott of Disney... and with a desire to mend fences with people of faith, it makes sense for the Mouse to market the movie to both the Christian and Secular audiences.

    They see how successful "The Passion of the Christ" was- even with subtitles, and how many people rush to see the latest Star Wars/Harry Potter/or Lord of the Rings flick... and of course they want some of that action.

    Since Tolken and Lewis were contemporaries and friends, it is hoped that the L,W, & W movie will be as successful.

    A website that delves heavily into Disney had a good article on this very thing:

    http://www.jimhillmedia.com/article.php?id=1610

    By the way... many Christians did not jump on the "Boycott Disney" bandwagon, accepting the fact that any company may have a mixture of good and bad things associated with it- our job being discrening the difference.
  8.    #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by whmurray
    I cannot help but wonder what our culture might look like if Shakespeare had Spielberg's tools or Mozart had had a tape recorder.
    Great question! I think we generally feel that these geniuses would be enhanced by our tools while we feel that the politicians of the day would be hindered.

    Just saw a great program on PBS last night on Einstein's Big Idea. REALLY well done! I was taken aback by how much energy scientists in Farraday's time put into discovering and proving things we take for granted and learn in the first week of a high school physics class.

    It makes me look forward to the days when my girls are old enough to take advantage of all of the science we've learned to date.
    Recognizing that I volunteered...
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskanDad
    Great question! I think we generally feel that these geniuses would be enhanced by our tools while we feel that the politicians of the day would be hindered.....
    Note that almost everything we know of Mozart's work he recorded in musical notation, in ink, using a quill pen. However, his contemporaries recorded the fact that he was brilliant at improvisation. All of that spontaneity is lost to us. Imagine if all we knew of Ray Charles was on paper.
  10. #10  
    I loved these books as a kid and read the whole series at least 3 times throughout my life....the last time being about 2 years ago when the publish all of the books in one.

    As many of have already stated.....it is a good story. That is also why I enjoyed all the Harry Potter books too. There is no doubt that CS Lewis intended Christian undertones to the story....but even putting that asside there are still good "moral to the story" themes through out the whole series.

    I first saw this trailer about 6 months ago, and have been looking forward to it very much ever since. It looks like it was really well done, both in effects, quality, artistic, etc.......(especially when comparing to BBC's attempt some time ago).
  11. #11  
    I would have to say, when I became a born-again Christian in 2000, "Mere Christianity" was a pivotal factor in my decision. I am looking forward to the movie, although in most cases, the movie has never been as mind stimulating as the book...but the affects are always good.
    The only thing that separates the men from the boys...is the lessons they learn.
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  12. #12  
    I loved the Narnia Chronicles!! My teacher used to read them to us during story hour. The backstory and info on the author just adds to the story, IMO. Just like folx took apart the matrix, Lord of the Rings ,Star War's, Harry Potter, etc, for hidden/double meanings, they do so with this story. Its part of the fun! I cant wait to see the movie. I was recently thinking about getting the full set of books, since I dont have them all any more. As far as the Christian background/theme, with all the negative stuff you hear about Harry Potter in some Christian arenas, this is a way to enjoy a fantasy with out all that crap attached to it. Let them market it anyway they like.
    The value of knowledge is not in its possession, but in its use.

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