Page 1 of 12 12345611 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 236
  1. NRG
    NRG is offline
    NRG's Avatar
    Posts
    3,657 Posts
    Global Posts
    3,670 Global Posts
       #1  
    The GOP that we know today got its rise to power by running on getting rid of corruption. Correct me if I am wrong, but the Dems were some corrupt bastards themselves back in day, hence the GOP being "the party of reform". I guess it goes to show that "absolute power corrupts absolutely". I find it amusing that the GOP came power on the message of stamping out corruption, and as we have seen over the past couple of weeks, they themselves have become corrupt. The tables are turned. I would bet that, within a few weeks we will hear the dems calling themselves the "the party of reform" and start calling for more accountability within our government. We will most likely start to hear about them wanting to get rid of the corporate influence that has a strangle hold on our Democracy. We will hear many such messages emanating from the left in the coming future. Well enough with that.

    1911 wanted to give this subject it’s own thread so here it is. Now I know the Dems are probably corrupt in some areas as well, so you righties out there bring this to our attention, which I am sure you will.

    Well here are some of the infractions that have come to light in the past couple of weeks.



    Sen. Bill Frist

    Source: USA Today

    SEC launches formal investigation of Frist By Paul Davidson, USA TODAY
    Fri Sep 30, 7:23 AM ET



    The Securities and Exchange Commission has stepped up its probe of Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist's sale of HCA stock by launching a formal investigation into whether Frist broke inside-trading laws.



    HCA, which was co-founded by Frist's father and is the USA's No. 1 hospital chain, announced Thursday the escalation of what had been an informal inquiry. The company said it's cooperating with authorities. SEC spokesman John Nestor declined to comment.


    The formal status of the SEC inquiry doesn't mean that regulators have obtained evidence against the Tennessee Republican. Rather, it gives the agency the power to subpoena phone or bank records, says Jacob Frenkel of Shulman Rogers in Rockville, Md., a former federal prosecutor and SEC attorney.


    Adds John Coffee, a Columbia University Law School professor: "In a Republican administration, (the SEC) would be extremely embarrassed if there were questions whether they delayed giving authority to the staff to conduct (a formal) investigation."

    -snip-
    More news of Frist

    Tom Delay

    Source: WaPo

    Gambling Interests Funded DeLay Trip
    Later in 2000, Lawmaker's Vote Helped Defeat Regulatory Measure

    By James V. Grimaldi and R. Jeffrey Smith
    Washington Post Staff Writers
    Saturday, March 12, 2005; Page A01

    An Indian tribe and a gambling services company made donations to a Washington public policy group that covered most of the cost of a $70,000 trip to Britain by House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R-Tex.), his wife, two aides and two lobbyists in mid-2000, two months before DeLay helped kill legislation opposed by the tribe and the company.

    The sponsor of the week-long trip listed in DeLay's financial disclosures was the nonprofit National Center for Public Policy Research, but a person involved in arranging DeLay's travel said that lobbyist Jack Abramoff suggested the trip and then arranged for checks to be sent by two of his clients, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and eLottery Inc.

    The dates on the checks coincided with the day DeLay left on the trip, May 25, 2000, according to grants documents reviewed by The Washington Post. The Choctaw and eLottery each sent a check for $25,000, according to the documents. They now say that they were unaware the money was being used to finance DeLay's travels.

    But Amy Ridenour, president of the National Center, said that, when the trip was arranged, Abramoff promised he would secure financial backing. She said that even without Abramoff's efforts, the National Center would have borne the cost of the trip, which was intended to allow the group to network with conservative British politicians and included an outing to the famous St. Andrews golf course in Scotland.

    -snip-
    Source: WaPo

    DeLay Ethics Allegations Now Cause of GOP Concern

    By Mike Allen
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Monday, March 14, 2005; Page A01

    House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R-Tex.) has dismissed questions about his ethics as partisan attacks, but revelations last week about his overseas travel and ties to lobbyists under investigation have emboldened Democrats and provoked worry among Republicans.

    With some members increasingly concerned that DeLay had left himself vulnerable to attack, several Republican aides and lobbyists said for the first time that they are worried about whether he will survive and what the consequences could be for the party's image.

    "If death comes from a thousand cuts, Tom DeLay is into a couple hundred, and it's getting up there," said a Republican political consultant close to key lawmakers. "The situation is negatively fluid right now for the guy. You start hitting arteries, it only takes a couple." The consultant, who at times has been a DeLay ally, spoke on the condition of anonymity, saying he could not be candid otherwise.

    At least six Republicans expressed concern over the weekend about DeLay's situation. They said they do not think DeLay necessarily deserves the unwanted attention he is receiving. But they said that the volume of the revelations about his operation is becoming alarming and that they do not see how it will abate.

    -snip-
    [/quote]

    Source: Wikipedia

    DeLay's defense of Quayle
    In 1988, when questions were raised about then-Republican vice-presidential nominee Dan Quayle's apparent use of family connections to get into the Indiana National Guard and thus avoid possible combat service in the Vietnam War, DeLay reportedly defended Quayle by saying that he had tried to enlist himself at the same age, but was told ethnic minorities had already filled most of the available positions and there were none left for him.

    No one close to him could say whether he made any other attempt to serve, and later The Washington Post reported that he had received student deferments while at Baylor, gotten a high lottery number in 1969 and then gotten married prior to his 1970 graduation from Houston.

    However, he had been asked to withdraw from Baylor for a semester and managed to keep his student deferment during that time, which has never been explained.


    Settlement in civil suit
    In early 1999, as the House vote on impeaching president Bill Clinton approached (a vote DeLay had worked very hard to ensure would succeed), Anne-Louise Bardach [16] at The New Republic picked up a story first reported by Houston-area alternative weeklies ([17]) alleging that DeLay himself had committed perjury during a civil lawsuit brought against him by a former business partner in 1994.

    The plaintiff in that suit, Robert Blankenship, had charged that DeLay and a third partner in Albo Pest Control had breached the partnership agreement by trying to force him out of the business without buying him out, and filed suit against DeLay, charging him and the other partner with breach of fiduciary duty, fraud, wrongful termination, loss of corporate expectancy, and injunctive relief. While being deposed in that suit, DeLay claimed that he didn't think he was an officer or director of Albo and believed he had resigned two or three years ago ([18]). Yet his own congressional disclosure forms, including one filed subsequent to the deposition state that he was either president or chairman of the company between 1985 and 1994. The plaintiff also alleged that Albo money had been spent on DeLay's congressional campaigns, in violation of federal and state law.

    DeLay and Blankenship settled for an undisclosed sum, and Blankenship's attorney told Bardach that had he known about the congressional disclosure forms, he would have referred the case to the Harris County district attorney's office for a perjury prosecution. These allegations have never been investigated and DeLay has never been charged.


    Accusations of misconduct in Texas fundraising and Grand Jury Indictment
    After the 1990 census, Texas Democrats drew what some Republicans have argued was the most effective partisan gerrymander in the country. Although Congressional Texas Democrats only received an average of 40 percent of the votes of Congressional Texas Republicans, Democrats consistently had a majority in the state delegation. After the 2000 census, Republicans sought to redraw the district lines to support a GOP majority in the congressional delegation while Democrats desired to retain a plan similar to the existing lines. The two parties reached an impasse in the Texas Legislature, where Republicans controlled the Senate and Democrats controlled the House. As a result the new district lines were drawn by a federal court panel and largely retained the status quo.

    In 2001 the Texas Legislative Redistricting Board (a panel composed of the state's Lieutenant Governor, Comptroller, Speaker of the House, Attorney-General, and Land Commissioner) redrew state legislative districts in accordance with the census. The new map that was adopted by the Republican-dominated board gave the GOP an edge in winning the Texas House of Representatives, still controlled at that time by the Democrats. During the 2002 elections under these new maps, DeLay aggressively fundraised for Republican candidates under his Texans for a Republican Majority PAC (TRMPAC). It has since been alleged that TRMPAC was used to funnel illegal corporate donations into the campaigns of Republican candidates for State Representative. This allegation is currently the subject of an ongoing investigation by Travis County District Attorney Ronnie Earle, which led to indictments against DeLay on September 28, 2005.

    The GOP victories in 2002 resulted in their control of the Texas House in addition to the Senate. As a result, the Texas Legislature was called into session in 2003 to redistrict the state's congressional lines in favor of the Republican Party. A number of Democrats left the state, going to Oklahoma, and later New Mexico, to deny a quorum for voting. Helen Giddings, the recognized negotiator, was arrested in May of 2003, but later the arrest was called a mistake. Texas House Speaker Craddick apologized to Giddings and then ordered the Sergeant at Arms to incarcerate Giddings in the state capital buildings.

    On May 26, 2005, a Texas judge ruled that a committee formed by DeLay had violated state law by not disclosing over $600,000 worth of fundraising money, mostly from the credit card industry, $25,000 from Sears, Roebuck & Co.[19] $50,000 from Diversified Collections Services of San Leandro. [20] Some of the money was spent on manning phone banks and posting wanted posters on Federal Highways calling for the arrest of Democratic legislators with an 800 number to call if seen after the Democratic caucus left to Oklahoma in order to prevent redistricting legislation from passage. The Federal Highway Administration offered to cooperate in arresting the Democrats, forcing the Democrats to travel to Oklahoma by plane instead of by automobile.

    On September 30, 2004, the House Ethics Committee unanimously admonished DeLay because he "offered to endorse Representative [Nick] Smith's son in exchange for Representative Smith's vote in favor of the Medicare bill."[21]

    On October 6, 2004, the House Ethics Committee unanimously admonished DeLay on two counts. The first count stated that DeLay "created the appearance that donors were being provided with special access to Representative DeLay regarding the then-pending energy legislation." The second count said that DeLay "used federal resources in a political issue" by asking the Federal Aviation Administration and Justice Department to help track Texas legislators during the battle over Texas redistricting.[22]

    The House Ethics committee at the time of the latter admonishment deferred action on another count related to fund raising while that matter was subject to state criminal action. That state investigation eventually led to the felony indictment on September 28, 2005.

    On August 11, 2005, the Federal Elections Commission audited Americans for a Republican Majority Political Action Committee, a PAC founded by DeLay, and found that it failed to report more than $300,000 in debts owed to vendors and incorrectly paid for some committee activities with money from another DeLay-connected political committee.

    The FEC found that ARMPAC misreported receipts and the ending cash balance for 2001 activities and the beginning cash-on-hand, receipts, disbursements and ending cash-on-hand for 2002. ARMPAC also failed to report $322,306 owed to 25 vendors. ARMPAC disclosed the debts in amended reports, the FEC said.

    ARMPAC's state, non-federal arm paid some expenses and costs for events and activities that should have been paid by ARMPAC, the report said. ARMPAC representatives are reviewing that portion of the audit and understand "a payment from the federal account to the non-federal account may be required," the FEC said.

    There were no details given to indicate if the FEC would pursue enforcement action.

    On September 8, 2005, a federal grand jury indicted Texans for a Republican Majority, which illegally accepted a political contribution of $100,000 from the Alliance for Quality Nursing Home Care, and the Texas Association of Business on four indictments, including charges of unlawful political advertising, unlawful contributions to a political committee and unlawful expenditures such as those to a graphics company and political candidates [23].

    On September 13, 2005, a federal grand jury indicted Jim Ellis, who heads Americans for a Republican Majority, and John Colyandro, former executive director of Texans for a Republican Majority, who already faced charges of money laundering in the case. Colyandro also faces 13 counts of unlawful acceptance of a corporate political contribution [24].

    DeLay was indicted on September 28, 2005 by a Travis County grand jury on issues dealing with his involvement in the PAC Texans for a Republican Majority. DeLay had waived his rights under the statutes of limitations, which had expired in the summer of 2005. Because of Republican party rules regarding leadership and indictments, DeLay has stepped down temporarily from his position as House Majority Leader, while he retains his seat representing Texas' 22nd congressional district. White House spokesman Scott McClellan commented by saying that President Bush still viewed DeLay as "a good ally, a leader who we have worked closely with to get things done for the American people."

    DeLay's indictment occured along with that of two associates, John Colyandro, former executive director of a Texas political action committee formed by DeLay, and Jim Ellis, the head of DeLay's national political committee. The charges were brought before the grand jury by the District Attorney of Travis County, Ronnie Earle, a Democrat who has prosecuted Democrats and Republicans alike, including U.S. Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison. Joe Turner, who represents Colyandro has said that he does not want a jury trial in Austin, because he believes that "DeLay and Republicans are hated [there]".[25]

    DeLay blasted the charge as a "sham" and an act of "political retribution," perpetuated by his opponents. He added, "I have done nothing wrong, I have violated no law, no regulation, no rule of the House." CNN


    Accusations of misuse of federal investigative agencies
    During the above Texas redistricting warrant controversy, several members of the Texas State House of Representatives who were members of the Democratic Party left the state in order to prevent the House from having a quorum of members, and therefore preventing the House from acting on any legislation. Although not a member of the Texas legislature, DeLay became involved, contacting:

    Three Federal Aviation Administration offices (in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Fort Worth, Texas and Washington, D.C.)
    Four Federal Bureau of Investigation offices (in Dallas, Texas, Corpus Christi, Texas, Austin, Texas and Ardmore, Oklahoma)
    Two United States Marshal offices (in the Western and Northern Districts of Texas)
    The United States Attorney's office in San Antonio, Texas
    The Office of Legislative Affairs at the United States Department of Justice
    The Air and Marine Interdiction Coordination Center (in Riverside, California)
    DeLay apparently intended to find out where the Democratic legislators were located, and to force them to return to Texas in order to create a quorum in the House of Representatives.

    Senator Joseph Lieberman requested an investigation into the Congressman's involvement in the requests, and asked that any White House involvement be reported. The House Ethics Committee unanimously admonished DeLay for these actions.


    The K Street Project
    DeLay's involvement with the lobbying industry also includes a pointed effort on the part of the Republican Party to parlay the Congressional majority into a dominance of K Street, the famed lobbying district of Washington, D.C. DeLay, Senator Rick Santorum, and Grover Norquist of Americans for Tax Reform launched a campaign in 1995 encouraging lobbying firms to retain Republican officials in top positions. Firms that had Democrats in positions of authority, DeLay suggested, would not be granted the ear of Majority Party members. Firms initially responded to this campaign but it has waned since 2004, when the possibility of Senator John Kerry winning the presidency gave ample incentive for hiring Democrats.


    DeLay and Terri Schiavo
    DeLay also made headlines for his role in the Terri Schiavo controversy. On Palm Sunday weekend in March 2005, several days after the brain-damaged Florida woman's feeding tube was disconnected for the third time, DeLay and other House Republicans met in emergency session to pass a bill allowing Schiavo's parents to petition the removal of the feeding tube to a federal judge. DeLay called the removal of the feeding tube "an act of barbarism." DeLay faced charges of hypocrisy from his critics when the Los Angeles Times revealed that he had consented to ending the life support for his own father, who was in a comatose state because of a debilitating accident in 1988 [26].

    DeLay was accused of stirring up controversy in the wake of a series of high-profile violent crimes and death threats against judges when he said that "the men responsible [for Terri Schiavo's death] will have to answer to their behavior." DeLay's comments came soon after the February 28, 2005 homicide of the mother and husband of Chicago Judge Joan Lefkow, and the March 11, 2005 killing of Atlanta Judge Rowland Barnes. DeLay's opponents accused him of rationalizing violence against judges when their decisions were unpopular with the public. Ralph Neas, President of the liberal People for the American Way, said that DeLay's comments were "irresponsible and could be seen by some as justifying inexcusable conduct against our courts." [27] DeLay publicly apologized for the remark after being accused of threatening the Supreme Court.

    In May 2005, the hit NBC television drama Law & Order: Criminal Intent used DeLay's name in a negative way. On the show, Detective Alexandra Eames (played by Kathryn Erbe), investigating homicides of several judges, said, "Maybe we should put out an APB for somebody in a Tom DeLay T-Shirt." The show was apparently referring to the comments DeLay made about Supreme Court justices during the Terri Schiavo controversy. DeLay responded by writing to Jeff Zucker, president of Universal Television Group: "This manipulation of my name and trivialization of the sensitive issue of judicial security represents a reckless disregard for the suffering initiated by recent tragedies and a great disservice to public discourse." The producer of the show, **** Wolf, replied that "these shows are works of fiction." Wolf also commented, "But I do congratulate Congressman DeLay for switching the spotlight from his own problems to an episode of a television show."


    Cuban Cigar
    DeLay has long been known as a strong critic of Cuban leader Fidel Castro, and a supporter of the trade embargo against Cuba. In April 2005, Time Magazine published a photo from a July 2003 trip to Israel. In the photo, DeLay is seen smoking a Cuban cigar [28], an activity which is illegal in the United States, but legal in Israel. At the time, smoking a Cuban cigar abroad was legal for U.S. citizens. However, since September 2004, the Treasury Department's enforcement of the law has been toughened to forbid consumption or purchase of Cuban cigars by U.S. citizens anywhere in the world.

    -snip-

    Jack Abramoff

    Source: Slate

    Jack Abramoff
    The friend Tom DeLay can't shake.
    By James Harding
    Posted Thursday, April 7, 2005, at 3:36 PM PT


    Where to begin examining the extraordinary career of Jack Abramoff? His work trying to secure a visa for the great Zairian kleptocrat Mobutu Sese Seko, perhaps, or the bilking of an estimated $66 million out of Native American tribes, clients he described as "monkeys," "troglodytes," and "idiots"? Or his leadership of a 1980s think tank financed, unbeknownst to him apparently, by the intelligence arm of South Africa's apartheid regime?

    No, the chapter of our man's story that matters most at the moment begins with a toast given by House Majority Leader Tom DeLay during a New Year's trip they both took to Saipan in the Northern Mariana Islands in 1997. "When one of my closest and dearest friends, Jack Abramoff, your most able representative in Washington, D.C., invited me to the islands, I wanted to see firsthand the free-market success and the progress and reform you have made," DeLay said before an audience of Abramoff's clients in the islands' garment industry—whom, upon his return to Washington, he helped win an extended exemption from federal immigration and labor laws.

    The most salient fact about Abramoff these days is that he may prove DeLay's undoing. The House majority leader has so far commanded extraordinary, tight-lipped loyalty from the Republican ranks in Congress in the face of scandals detailed here. But precedent is not on his side. Newt Gingrich's political demise was a slow death by a thousand cuts. Today there is already plenty of speculation in Washington that the White House is wavering about DeLay: As much as the president prizes loyalty, he is intolerant of sleaze and impatient with damaging distractions from his agenda. "Within six months, Karl will force him out," a senior administration official from the first term says, speaking, of course, of Karl Rove. At least one conservative redoubt, the Wall Street Journal's editorial page, has already thrown open the door. Mr. DeLay has "an unsavory whiff that could have GOP loyalists reaching for the political Glade if it gets any worse," the paper wrote last week.

    -snip-
    Bush Admin

    Source: NY Times

    Audit Assails the White House for Public Relations Spending

    By ROBERT PEAR
    Published: September 30, 2005
    WASHINGTON, Sept. 30 - Federal auditors said today that the Bush administration had violated the law by purchasing favorable news coverage of President Bush's education policies, by making payments to the conservative commentator Armstrong Williams and by hiring a public relations company to analyze media perceptions of the Republican Party.

    In a blistering report, the investigators, from the Government Accountability Office, said the administration had disseminated "covert propaganda" inside the United States, in violation of a longstanding, explicit statutory ban.

    The contract with Mr. Williams and the general contours of the administration's public relations campaign had been known for months. The report today provided the first definitive ruling on the legality of the activities.

    Lawyers from the G.A.O., an independent nonpartisan arm of Congress, found that the Bush administration had systematically analyzed news articles to see if they carried the message, "The Bush administration/the G.O.P. is committed to education."

    The auditors declared: "We see no use for such information except for partisan political purposes. Engaging in a purely political activity such as this is not a proper use of appropriated funds."

    -snip-
    The Plame Investagation.


    Roy Blunt has his own ethics haunting him. Remember this is the guy the GOP put up to fill in for Tom Delay. He (Blunt) was named to the list of being one of the 13 most corrupt pols.

    There is alot more and I will bring it later.
  2. #2  
    Quote Originally Posted by NRG
    The GOP that we know today got its rise to power by running on getting rid of corruption. Correct me if I am wrong, but the Dems were some corrupt bastards themselves back in day, hence the GOP being "the party of reform". I guess it goes to show that "absolute power corrupts absolutely". I find it amusing that the GOP came power on the message of stamping out corruption, and as we have seen over the past couple of weeks, they themselves have become corrupt. The tables are turned. I would bet that, within a few weeks we will hear the dems calling themselves the "the party of reform" and start calling for more accountability within our government. We will most likely start to hear about them wanting to get rid of the corporate influence that has a strangle hold on our Democracy. We will hear many such messages emanating from the left in the coming future. Well enough with that.

    1911 wanted to give this subject it’s own thread so here it is. Now I know the Dems are probably corrupt in some areas as well, so you righties out there bring this to our attention, which I am sure you will.

    Well here are some of the infractions that have come to light in the past couple of weeks.
    Oh geeez, some infractions, big deal. What, a couple of missteps and their all corrupt now?
  3. #3  
    BLA... both parties are corrupt as hell. As far as I'm concerned, both the political parties suck and both should be destoyed into oblivion for the good of democracy in this country....of course that's jusy my cynical .02 cents!
    _________________
    aka Gfunkmagic

    Current device: Palm Pre
    Device graveyard: Palm Vx, Cassiopeia E100, LG Phenom HPC, Palm M515, Treo 300, Treo 600, Treo 650, Treo 700p, Axim X50v, Treo 800w



    Please don't PM me about my avatar. For more info go here.

    Restore your Pre to factory settings using webos doctor and follow these instructions
  4. #4  
    NRG, who do you endorse? I am tired of any of the current two party system or the over zealous green party.
  5. NRG
    NRG is offline
    NRG's Avatar
    Posts
    3,657 Posts
    Global Posts
    3,670 Global Posts
       #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by ronbo2000
    NRG, who do you endorse? I am tired of any of the current two party system or the over zealous green party.
    I will endorse anyone who will balance the budget, make the government smaller, uphold the right to privacy, won't cave to special interests, listens to there constituents, believes in an international community yet puts America in it's leader role, will try and narrow the trade deficit, believes in a woman’s right to choose, won't mess with our right to bear arms, etc. I have got more things I look for, these are just some of the few off the top of my head. Do I sound conservative or liberal? I think I am just an American who believes in America the way it is. I don't want someone in there trying to change things to their own idealouge. I think the things I listed are core American values and I cherish them.


    As far as the two party system goes, I think more parties getting involved would be great. But the two parties we know, have corrupted the voting system in their favor so much in the past century that it makes it so hard for a third party to try and get footing. The primaries are an example. Another problem is alot of people are "yellow dogs" and really don't pay attention to the issues. Till some of this changes you are going to find we will be stuck in the two party system.
  6. NRG
    NRG is offline
    NRG's Avatar
    Posts
    3,657 Posts
    Global Posts
    3,670 Global Posts
       #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by gfunkmagic
    BLA... both parties are corrupt as hell. As far as I'm concerned, both the political parties suck and both should be destoyed into oblivion for the good of democracy in this country....of course that's jusy my cynical .02 cents!
    Right! The Repubs are just catching most of the heat right now because they are the big dogs as of now.
  7. #7  
    Read this op-ed piece in the New York Times today:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/01/op...ontinetti.html
    The author identifies himself as a Republican and conservative. His most telling remark is that it took the Dems 40 years to get completely corrupted and the Reps only 10.
  8. NRG
    NRG is offline
    NRG's Avatar
    Posts
    3,657 Posts
    Global Posts
    3,670 Global Posts
       #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by zvandiver
    Read this op-ed piece in the New York Times today:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/01/op...ontinetti.html
    The author identifies himself as a Republican and conservative. His most telling remark is that it took the Dems 40 years to get completely corrupted and the Reps only 10.
    Thanks for the link. For you folks that don't feel like registering here is smoe choice snips.

    Source: NY Times

    Contract Killers
    By MATTHEW CONTINETTI
    Published: October 1, 2005

    At this, Washingtonians with long memories were barely able to suppress their grins. If Mr. DeLay and his supporters grasped the irony of the occasion, they gave no clue. Eleven years ago this past week, Republican congressmen and candidates unveiled their "Contract With America." Their proposals came just in time for the 1994 midterm elections, which brought the Republicans to power after a 40-year stint in the minority. Back then, Mr. DeLay and other Republicans promised "a new order." They pledged to drain the swamp that was Washington. Just over a decade later, they find themselves up to their necks in the muck.

    In the week before Mr. DeLay's indictment, David Safavian, a White House official in the Office of Management and Budget, was arrested in connection with the Justice Department investigation into the lobbying practices of Jack Abramoff, the conservative activist and Republican Party fundraiser. It was the first arrest in the 18-month inquiry, but it is probably not the last. Grease from the Abramoff scandal has rubbed off on conservative stalwarts like the antitax activist Grover Norquist;Ralph Reed, the former executive director of the Christian Coalition; and Republican lawmakers like Representative Bob Ney of Ohio, Senator Conrad Burns of Montana and - here's that name again - Tom DeLay.

    Meanwhile the Securities and Exchange Commission is preparing to issue subpoenas in its inquiry into the finances of the Senate majority leader, Bill Frist. And a grand jury investigation into who in the White House leaked the identity of a C.I.A. officer to the press two years ago lumbers toward completion.

    -snip-

    Led by Mr. DeLay in the House, Rick Santorum in the Senate and Grover Norquist downtown, Republicans worked not just toward the partisan realignment of the country, but of the influence industry, too. They tracked which lobbyists were Democrats and which Republicans, refused to meet with the Democrats and pressured business groups and law firms to hire the conservatives. Their strenuous efforts to blur the boundaries between corporate America and the Republican Party came to be known as the K Street Project.

    It was an incredible success. By 2002, if you look at numbers from the Center for Responsive Politics, industries that had long made bipartisan campaign contributions largely abandoned the Democrats, leaving Republicans with an overwhelming edge in corporate donations. By 2004, the lobbyists themselves gave the Republicans $1 million more than they gave Democrats. The number of Republican lobbyists grew. And so did the number of lobbyists, period - from about 9,000 when the Republicans took power to more than 34,000 today.

    -snip-

    Young conservatives in particular will react to the new, post-DeLay reality in different ways. I know I have. First, looking at your party's troubles, you see perverse confirmation of conservatism's animating idea: that as the sphere of public decision-making expands, so do the opportunities for graft and wrongdoing. Next you note, with sadness, that while political power helped bring about some achievements - welfare reform, pro-growth tax cuts, an assertive, moralistic foreign policy - it may have also exhausted conservatism's fighting spirit, lowered the movement's intellectual standards and replaced a healthy independence with partisan water-carrying.

    But then you take solace in the idea that the Republican Party has once again bested the Democrats, who after all took 40 years to sprout the warts of power.

    Matthew Continetti,a staff writer at The Weekly Standard, is writing a book about the Republican Party.
  9. #9  
    As someone who identifies himself as a conservative, not a Republican, I'm in full agreement with the Matthew Continetti's NYT op-ed (and as a subscriber to the Weekly Standard, I'll vouch for his conservative bona fides ). What's happened to the GOP while in power is in-fact (ironically so) proof of many core conservative beliefs about limited government. *sigh* It's probably time to start talking about term limits again.
    Current: iPhone 3G
    Retired from active duty: Treo 800w, Sprint Touch, Mogul, Apache, Cingular Treo 650, HP iPaq 4350, T|T, M505 - Nokia 3650 - SE R520m, T610, T637, Moto P280, etc, etc...
  10. #10  
    Having admitted to problems in the elected GOP, I found this story about disarray and despair among Democrats interesting as well:

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9516671/site/newsweek/

    In the words of one of my regular reads, VodkaPundit, "Just what we need in a time of war: Two abso-frickin'-lutely useless parties to choose from."
    Current: iPhone 3G
    Retired from active duty: Treo 800w, Sprint Touch, Mogul, Apache, Cingular Treo 650, HP iPaq 4350, T|T, M505 - Nokia 3650 - SE R520m, T610, T637, Moto P280, etc, etc...
  11. vw2002's Avatar
    Posts
    904 Posts
    Global Posts
    939 Global Posts
    #11  
    Bingo.
    I gotta have more cowbell
  12. NRG
    NRG is offline
    NRG's Avatar
    Posts
    3,657 Posts
    Global Posts
    3,670 Global Posts
       #12  
    Yet Another.

    Source: Cleveland Free Times


    Hearts and Minds : Contract Shillers

    Taft to be deposed in corruption lawsuit
    By Larry durstin


    THERE IS PROBABLY NOTHING less exciting about government work than the awarding of contracts to private companies to provide goods and services. But over the next several months, Cleveland attorney Ken Seminatore intends to wade neck-deep into state bureaucracy, interviewing executives from dozens of companies that have done business with Ohio over the past four years, and the elected officials who had a hand in awarding those contracts.

    Governor Bob Taft, gubernatorial hopefuls Attorney General Jim Petro and Auditor Betty Montgomery and many others will get to spend a few hours in a conference room, answering questions for a far-reaching lawsuit alleging massive corruption in the awarding of no-bid contracts by Ohio politicians.
    “This represents the first time a private party has been able to take documentary and deposition discovery of statewide officials in a corruption case,” says Seminatore, who has been practicing law in Cleveland for 35 years.
    Filed in August 2004, Hagan v. Taft — the Hagan being Cuyahoga County Commissioner Tim Hagan, who ran for governor against Taft in 2002 — was stayed shortly thereafter. But last month, Judge Joseph Kainrad ruled that discovery should re-commence and be concluded on or before February 28, 2006. Kainrad is a retired judge from Portage County who had been appointed by Ohio Chief Justice Thomas Moyer to preside over the case after Moyer had disqualified every judge in Cuyahoga County from hearing it.
    At the heart of the lawsuit is the allegation that due to Republicans’ dominance of state offices, the legislature and the Supreme Court for the past decade, elected officials have awarded lucrative public contracts to campaign contributors at costs much higher than would have resulted from competitive bidding.
    This “pay to play” practice eventually funnels excess taxpayer monies — generated by the inflated project costs — back into the elected officials’ reelection campaigns.
    “The difference between this and the [Bureau of Workers’ Compensation] scandal is that BWC deals with employer premium dollars, not taxpayers’ money,” says Seminatore. “It’s the same scam, though. Frankly, what the Ohio Republicans have stolen from BWC is peanuts compared to what they’ve stolen from taxpayers in no-bid schemes.”


    -snip-
  13. #13  
    I'm mystified.

    I thought the righties had the "perfect plan".

    Take over the levers of communication and progaganda, take over the entire governing apparatus -- eliminate "checks and balances", become all powerful, make your friends super rich, and never worry about ever being investigated.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  14. #14  
    Power corrupts. What a shock.

    I agreed with term limits as introduced in the Contract With America - and still do.

    But before we get too carried away here about the GOP, how about a little perspective. The Republicans have problems with a few politicians who are *accused* of wrongdoing. The Democrats have had a few politicians *convicted* of wrongdoing (Rostenkowski, Traficant, Toricelli, etc...). I trust you were just as harsh on your own side at the time.

    Fight for ideas and not politicians - at least they don't disappoint as often.
    Current: iPhone 3G
    Retired from active duty: Treo 800w, Sprint Touch, Mogul, Apache, Cingular Treo 650, HP iPaq 4350, T|T, M505 - Nokia 3650 - SE R520m, T610, T637, Moto P280, etc, etc...
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by phurth
    Power corrupts. What a shock.

    I agreed with term limits as introduced in the Contract With America - and still do.

    But before we get too carried away here about the GOP, how about a little perspective. The Republicans have problems with a few politicians who are *accused* of wrongdoing. The Democrats have had a few politicians *convicted* of wrongdoing (Rostenkowski, Traficant, Toricelli, etc...). I trust you were just as harsh on your own side at the time.

    Fight for ideas and not politicians - at least they don't disappoint as often.
    the politicians you've cited -- and others you didn't -- were all part of minor embarrassing affairs. They were guilty of modest personal misdemeanors -- petty issues involving modest amounts of money. (Trafficant was never a leader, and hardly even worth mentioning as a democrat).

    What makes the repugnicans corruption so vile and toxic was that it is the product of a comprehensive self righteous accretion of power and mindless control in pursuit of an ignorant anti intellectual ideology, combined with raw unapologetic greed.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE
    the politicians you've cited -- and others you didn't -- were all part of minor embarrassing affairs. They were guilty of modest personal misdemeanors
    Last I checked, they were all convicted of felonies.
    (Trafficant was never a leader, and hardly even worth mentioning as a democrat).
    ...and a bit of a nut.
    What makes the repugnicans corruption so vile and toxic
    ...alleged corruption
    was that it is the product of a comprehensive self righteous accretion of power
    Uh, that's what politicians do - (especially liberals).
    and mindless control in pursuit of an ignorant anti intellectual ideology, combined with raw unapologetic greed.
    Characterizing our political adversaries as evil incarnate is a mistake we conservatives made with Clinton. You make the same mistake now with Bush and the Republicans.
    Current: iPhone 3G
    Retired from active duty: Treo 800w, Sprint Touch, Mogul, Apache, Cingular Treo 650, HP iPaq 4350, T|T, M505 - Nokia 3650 - SE R520m, T610, T637, Moto P280, etc, etc...
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by phurth
    Characterizing our political adversaries as evil incarnate is a mistake we conservatives made with Clinton. You make the same mistake now with Bush and the Republicans.
    to this charge, I plead guilty.

    The left has its history of stupidity and arrogance (especially overseas). But never in this country has there ever been a more malicious and venal cabal of self-righteous know-nothings as has been empowered the last 6 years or so.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  18. #18  
    But never in this country has there ever been a more malicious and venal cabal of self-righteous know-nothings as has been empowered the last 6 years or so.
    Thank you for making my point better than I could have.
    Current: iPhone 3G
    Retired from active duty: Treo 800w, Sprint Touch, Mogul, Apache, Cingular Treo 650, HP iPaq 4350, T|T, M505 - Nokia 3650 - SE R520m, T610, T637, Moto P280, etc, etc...
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by NRG
    Right! The Repubs are just catching most of the heat right now because they are the big dogs as of now.
    If that were true, there would be Dems still in jail for taking ChiCom money during the 90's. Louis Freeh's book is full of revelations on Chinagate. Who can forget John Glenn's magnificent effort at stonewalling that investigation? Fred Thompson actually thought Glenn a man of honor.

    The difference is that media is doing nothing more than acting as a boom box for the Democrats. That is what is driving this "climate of corruption". They're attemptiong to sway middle of the roaders and demoralize the Repub base. (Though in truth the Repubs have done a fine job of doing that on their own with their big government spending, etc.)
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE
    to this charge, I plead guilty.

    The left has its history of stupidity and arrogance (especially overseas). But never in this country has there ever been a more malicious and venal cabal of self-righteous know-nothings as has been empowered the last 6 years or so.
    Stupidity? As in hundreds of millions killed around the world by communism?

    I want to know of the American left will ever be held to account for the disaster the welfare state caused in this country. Destruction of the inner cities. Destruction of the family unit. Soaring crime and violence. Trillions in debt. LBJ's War on Poverty really paid some great dividends.
Page 1 of 12 12345611 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions