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  1. #161  
    Quote Originally Posted by 1911sforever
    Yes You Are A Crazy Screamer!
    LMAO
    I'm so Great I'm jealous of myself!
  2. cardio's Avatar
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    #162  
    I'm not petrified. I do have the ability to understand that the threat of another terrorist attack in the US is a very real possibility that we need to be aware of and take the appropriate action to prevent if at all possible. If you do not believe that the terrorist would like to attack us on our soil again please reinsert head in the sand. You do realize that Clinton (both), as well as most of the world believed there were WMDs prior tot he invasion don' you.
    "If It Weren't For The United States Military"
    "There Would Be NO United States of America"
  3. #163  
    Yes but were mis-informed by the "CIA" and various informants. I do agree though, I think its going to happen here in the US again. I'm talking about really soon here. Did anyone catch the Dateline exclusive that showed even more terrorists by the tens of thousands signing up for terrorist training camp? What was scary is that a majority of them already live in the US. OMG that was some pretty scary stuff there. This is something we need to unite for, yes we're in a war. A war we had no real way out of. But we need to focus on why we're at war, not just Bush's errors as much as I love to bash that little guy but because of the terrorist still here in the US. Whats it going to take to get the liberals and conservatives to unite? Hmmm...maybe a nuke? Theres an idea...
    I'm so Great I'm jealous of myself!
  4. cardio's Avatar
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    #164  
    UH-OH, what is ol Harry up to???
    Reid Aided Ambramoff Clients, Records Show


    The activities _ detailed in billing records and correspondence obtained by The Associated Press _ are far more extensive than previously disclosed. They occurred over three years as Reid collected nearly $68,000 in donations from Abramoff's firm, lobbying partners and clients.

    Abramoff's firm also hired one of Reid's top legislative aides as a lobbyist. The aide later helped throw a fundraiser for Reid at Abramoff's firm that raised donations from several of his lobbying partners.

    And Reid's longtime chief of staff accepted a free trip to Malaysia arranged by a consulting firm connected to Abramoff that recently has gained attention in the influence-peddling investigation that has gripped the Capitol.

    http://www.breitbart.com/news/2006/02/09/D8FLPHO80.html
    "If It Weren't For The United States Military"
    "There Would Be NO United States of America"
  5. #165  
    Dear Hobbes. I stated to you before, I am very doubtful that the downturn in violence is a lasting issue in Iraq and I have stated again and again, I think we may have made things worse. This was on the AP website a few minutes ago.. I am very afraid after what has gone on there in the last 24 hours, witht he mosque bombing...that we ahve made issues MUCH worse. (I am also adding a NY times artciel below the AP piece. Read below;

    Back to Story - Help
    Mosque Attack Pushes Iraq Toward Civil War By ZIAD KHALAF, Associated Press Writer
    1 hour, 48 minutes ago



    Insurgents posing as police destroyed the golden dome of one of Iraq's holiest Shiite shrines Wednesday, setting off an unprecendented spasm of sectarian violence. Angry crowds thronged the streets, militiamen attacked Sunni mosques, and at least 19 people were killed.

    With the gleaming dome of the 1,200-year-old Askariya shrine reduced to rubble, some Shiites lashed out at the United States as partly to blame.

    The violence many of the 90 attacks on Sunni mosques were carried out by Shiite militias seemed to push Iraq closer to all-out civil war than at any point in the three years since the U.S.-led overthrow of Saddam Hussein.

    Many leaders called for calm. "We are facing a major conspiracy that is targeting Iraq's unity," said President Jalal Talabani, a Kurd. "We should all stand hand in hand to prevent the danger of a civil war."

    President Bush pledged American help to restore the mosque after the bombing north of Baghdad, which dealt a severe blow to U.S. efforts to keep Iraq from falling deeper into sectarian violence.

    "The terrorists in Iraq have again proven that they are enemies of all faiths and of all humanity," Bush said. "The world must stand united against them, and steadfast behind the people of Iraq."

    British Prime Minister Tony Blair also condemned the bombing and pledged funds toward the shrine's reconstruction.

    U.S. Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad and the top American commander in Iraq, Gen. George Casey, called the attack a deliberate attempt to foment sectarian strife and warned it was a "critical moment for Iraq."

    No one was reported injured in the bombing of the shrine in Samarra.

    But at least 19 people, including three Sunni clerics, were killed in the reprisal attacks that followed, mainly in Baghdad and predominantly Shiite provinces to the south, according to the Iraqi Islamic Party, the country's largest Sunni political group.

    Many of the attacks appeared to have been carried out by Shiite militias that the United States wants to see disbanded.

    In predominantly Shiite Basra, police said militiamen broke into a prison, hauled out 12 inmates, including two Egyptians, two Tunisians, a Libyan, a Saudi and a Turk, and shot them dead in reprisal for the shrine attack.

    Major Sunni groups joined in condemning the attack, and a leading Sunni politician, Tariq al-Hashimi, urged clerics and politicians to calm the situation "before it spins out of control."

    The country's top Shiite cleric, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, sent instructions to his followers forbidding attacks on Sunni mosques, and called for seven days of mourning.

    But he hinted, as did Vice President Adil Abdul-Mahdi, that religious militias could be given a bigger security role if the government cannot protecting holy shrines an ominous sign of the Shiite reaction ahead.

    Both Sunnis and the United States fear the rise of such militias, which the disaffected minority views as little more than death squads. American commanders believe they undercut efforts to create a professional Iraqi army and police force a key step toward the eventual drawdown of U.S. forces.

    Some Shiite political leaders already were angry with the United States because it has urged them to form a government in which nonsectarian figures control the army and police. Khalilzad warned this week in a statement clearly aimed at Shiite hard-liners that America would not continue to support institutions run by sectarian groups with links to armed militias.

    One top Shiite political leader accused Khalilzad of sharing blame for the attack on the shrine in Samarra.

    "These statements ... gave green lights to terrorist groups. And, therefore, he shares in part of the responsibility," said Abdul-Aziz al-Hakim, head of the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq and the former commander of its militia.

    The interior minister, who controls the security forces that Sunnis accuse of widepsread abuses, is a member of al-Hakim's party.

    The new tensions came as Iraq's various factions have been struggling to assemble a government after the Dec. 15 parliamentary elections.

    The Shiite fury sparked by Wednesday's bombings the third major attack against Shiite targets in as many days raised the likelihood that Shiite religious parties will reject U.S. demands to curb militias.

    The Askariya shrine, also known as the Golden Mosque, contains the tombs of two revered Shiite imams, who are considered by Shiites to be among the successors of the Prophet Muhammad.

    No group claimed responsibility for the 6:55 a.m. assault on the shrine in Samarra, a mostly Sunni Arab city 60 miles north of Baghdad, carried out by four insurgents disguised as police. But suspicion fell on Sunni extremist groups.

    The top of the dome, which was completed in 1905, collapsed into a crumbly mess, leaving just traces of gold showing through the rubble. Part of the shrine's tiled northern wall also was damaged.

    Thousands of demonstrators crowded near the wrecked shrine, and Iraqis picked through the debris, pulling out artifacts and copies of the Muslim holy book, the Quran, which they waved, along with Iraqi flags.

    "This criminal act aims at igniting civil strife," said Mahmoud al-Samarie, a 28-year-old builder. "We demand an investigation so that the criminals who did this be punished. If the government fails to do so, then we will take up arms and chase the people behind this attack."

    U.S. and Iraqi forces surrounded the Samarra shrine and searched nearby houses. About 500 soldiers were sent to Sunni neighborhoods in Baghdad to prevent clashes.

    On Al-Jazeera television, Sunni politician Adnan al-Dulaimi pledged that the violence would not discourage Sunnis from working to form a new government and claimed the Samarra attack was not planned by Sunni insurgents but "a foreign hand aiming to create differences among Iraqis."

    National Security Adviser Mouwafak al-Rubaie said 10 people were detained for questioning about the bombing. The Interior Ministry put the number at nine and said they included five guards.

    In the hours after the attack, more than 90 Sunni mosques were attacked with automatic rifles and rocket-propelled grenades, burned or taken over by Shiites, the Iraqi Islamic Party said.

    Large protests erupted in Shiite parts of Baghdad and in cities throughout the Shiite heartland to the south. In Basra, Shiite militants traded rifle and rocket-propelled grenade fire with guards at the office of the Iraqi Islamic Party. Smoke billowed from the building.

    Shiite protesters later set fire to a Sunni shrine containing the seventh century tomb of Talha bin Obeid-Allah, a companion of Muhammad, on the outskirts of Basra.

    Protesters in Najaf, Kut and Baghdad's Shiite slum of Sadr City also marched through the streets by the thousands, many shouting anti-American and anti-Israeli slogans and burning those nations' flags.

    Tradition says the Askariya shrine, which draws Shiite pilgrims from throughout the Islamic world, is near the place where the last of the 12 Shiite imams, Mohammed al-Mahdi, disappeared. Al-Mahdi was the son and grandson of the two imams buried in the Askariya shrine. Shiites believe he is still alive and will return to restore justice to humanity.



    Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. The information contained in the AP News report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press.


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    February 22, 2006
    Blast Destroys Shrine in Iraq, Setting Off Sectarian Fury
    By ROBERT F. WORTH
    BAGHDAD, Iraq, Feb. 22 A powerful explosion shattered the golden dome of one of Iraq's most revered Shiite shrines this morning, setting off a day of almost unparalleled sectarian fury in cities and towns across Iraq as protesting mobs took to the streets to chant for revenge and set fire to dozens of Sunni mosques.

    The bombing of the Golden Mosque in Samarra, 60 miles north of Baghdad, left its famous golden dome in ruins but injured no one, and only a handful of people appear to have been killed in the widespread street protests and violence that ensued.

    But the shrine has enormous significance for Shiites, and its destruction coming after two days of bloody attacks that left dozens of Shiite civilians dead ignited a nationwide outpouring of rage and panic that sharply underscored Iraq's sectarian divide.

    Shiite militia members flooded the streets of Baghdad, firing rocket-propelled grenades and machine guns at Sunni mosques as Iraqi Army soldiers called out to stop the violence stood helpless nearby. By the day's end, mobs had struck 27 Sunni mosques in the capital, killing three imams and kidnapping a fourth, Interior Ministry officials said.

    In the southern Shiite city of Basra, Shiite militia members destroyed at least two Sunni mosques, killing an imam, and launched an attack on the headquarters of Iraq's best-known Sunni Arab political party. In Samarra, thousands of people crowded the courtyard of the Golden Mosque, some weeping and kissing the stones, others angrily chanting "Our blood and souls we sacrifice for you imams!"

    President Bush issued a statement today extending his sympathy to Iraqis for the bombing.

    "The United States condemns this cowardly act in the strongest possible terms," Mr. Bush said in Washington. "I ask all Iraqis to exercise restraint in the wake of this tragedy, and to pursue justice in accordance with the laws and constitution of Iraq."

    All of Iraq's major political and religious leaders issued their own urgent appeals for restraint, and Prime Minister Ibrahim al Jaafari called for a three-day mourning period in a televised appearance. Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, Iraq's most senior Shiite cleric, released a statement in which he said, "If the government's security forces cannot provide the necessary protection, the believers will do it."

    The shrine bombing came after days of mounting violence aimed mostly at Shiite civilians, as Iraq's political leaders are struggling with little success to agree on the principles of a new national unity government. Insurgents have often struck during moments of political transition in the past, in apparent efforts to foment further conflict between Iraq's Shiite, Kurdish, and Sunni Arab political factions.

    Most Iraqi leaders attributed the attack to terrorists bent on exploiting sectarian rifts. But in a striking break from the past, the leader of Iraq's main Shiite political alliance said he thought Zalmay Khalilzad, the American ambassador to Iraq, was partly to blame for the bombing of the shrine.

    The Shiite leader, Abdul Aziz al Hakim, said he thought Mr. Khalilzad's public comments on Monday, in which he drew attention to apparent death squads operating within Iraq's Shiite-led Interior Ministry, were a provocation to the bombing. He did not explain how.

    "This declaration gave a green light for these groups to do their operation, so he is responsible for a part of that," Mr. Hakim said of the ambassador, at a news conference called to condemn the shrine bombing.

    The renegade Shiite cleric Muqtada al Sadr, whose Mahdi Army militia led many of the violent protests today, also placed some blame on what he called the "occupation forces" for the bombing, in comments to Al Jazeera Television. Mr. Sadr told the network he was cutting short a trip to Lebanon because of the shrine attack, and called on the new Iraqi Parliament, which includes 32 of his followers, to meet and vote on a request for coalition forces to leave Iraq.

    The attack in Samarra began at 7 a.m., when a group of a dozen men dressed in paramilitary uniforms entered the shrine and handcuffed four guards who were sleeping in a back room, said a spokesman for the provincial governor's office. The attackers then placed a bomb in the dome and detonated it, collapsing most of the dome and heavily damaging an adjoining wall.

    The shrine is one of four major Shiite shrines in Iraq, and two of the 12 imams revered by mainstream Shiites are buried in it: Ali al-Hadi, who died in 868 A.D., and his son, the 11th imam, Hassan al-Askari. According to legend, the 12th Imam, Muhammad al-Mahdi, went into hiding near the shrine, and Shiites believe he will return before the Day of Judgment to bring justice to a fallen world.

    No group claimed responsibility for the attack, but some Iraqi officials quickly pointed a finger at Al Qaeda in Mesopotamia, the jihadist group that is believed to be responsible for many of the attacks on Shiite civilians and mosques in the past two years.

    Samarra's population is mostly Sunni Arab, and it was a haven for insurgents until 2004, when American and Iraqi troops carried out a major operation to retake the city (and the Golden Mosque) from guerrilla fighters. But the insurgents have filtered back since then, and American troops in and around the city are now regularly attacked.

    Reporting for this article was contributed by Sabrina Tavernise, Mona Mahmoud, Khalid al Ansary, Omar al Neami, and Qais Mizher in Baghdad, and Iraqi employees of The New York Times in Basra, Kirkuk, Najaf, and Karbala.



    Copyright 2006The New York Times Company Home Privacy Policy Search Corrections XML Help Contact Us Work for Us Site Map Back to Top
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  6. cardio's Avatar
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    #166  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert
    Dear Hobbes. I stated to you before, I am very doubtful that the downturn in violence is a lasting issue in Iraq and I have stated again and again, I think we may have made things worse. This was on the AP website a few minutes ago.. I am very afraid after what has gone on there in the last 24 hours, witht he mosque bombing...that we ahve made issues MUCH worse. (I am also adding a NY times artciel below the AP piece. Read below;

    Back to Story - Help
    Mosque Attack Pushes Iraq Toward Civil War By ZIAD KHALAF, Associated Press Writer
    1 hour, 48 minutes ago



    Insurgents posing as police destroyed the golden dome of one of Iraq's holiest Shiite shrines Wednesday, setting off an unprecendented spasm of sectarian violence. Angry crowds thronged the streets, militiamen attacked Sunni mosques, and at least 19 people were killed.

    With the gleaming dome of the 1,200-year-old Askariya shrine reduced to rubble, some Shiites lashed out at the United States as partly to blame.

    The violence many of the 90 attacks on Sunni mosques were carried out by Shiite militias seemed to push Iraq closer to all-out civil war than at any point in the three years since the U.S.-led overthrow of Saddam Hussein.

    Many leaders called for calm. "We are facing a major conspiracy that is targeting Iraq's unity," said President Jalal Talabani, a Kurd. "We should all stand hand in hand to prevent the danger of a civil war."

    President Bush pledged American help to restore the mosque after the bombing north of Baghdad, which dealt a severe blow to U.S. efforts to keep Iraq from falling deeper into sectarian violence.

    "The terrorists in Iraq have again proven that they are enemies of all faiths and of all humanity," Bush said. "The world must stand united against them, and steadfast behind the people of Iraq."

    British Prime Minister Tony Blair also condemned the bombing and pledged funds toward the shrine's reconstruction.

    U.S. Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad and the top American commander in Iraq, Gen. George Casey, called the attack a deliberate attempt to foment sectarian strife and warned it was a "critical moment for Iraq."

    No one was reported injured in the bombing of the shrine in Samarra.

    But at least 19 people, including three Sunni clerics, were killed in the reprisal attacks that followed, mainly in Baghdad and predominantly Shiite provinces to the south, according to the Iraqi Islamic Party, the country's largest Sunni political group.

    Many of the attacks appeared to have been carried out by Shiite militias that the United States wants to see disbanded.

    In predominantly Shiite Basra, police said militiamen broke into a prison, hauled out 12 inmates, including two Egyptians, two Tunisians, a Libyan, a Saudi and a Turk, and shot them dead in reprisal for the shrine attack.

    Major Sunni groups joined in condemning the attack, and a leading Sunni politician, Tariq al-Hashimi, urged clerics and politicians to calm the situation "before it spins out of control."

    The country's top Shiite cleric, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, sent instructions to his followers forbidding attacks on Sunni mosques, and called for seven days of mourning.

    But he hinted, as did Vice President Adil Abdul-Mahdi, that religious militias could be given a bigger security role if the government cannot protecting holy shrines an ominous sign of the Shiite reaction ahead.

    Both Sunnis and the United States fear the rise of such militias, which the disaffected minority views as little more than death squads. American commanders believe they undercut efforts to create a professional Iraqi army and police force a key step toward the eventual drawdown of U.S. forces.

    Some Shiite political leaders already were angry with the United States because it has urged them to form a government in which nonsectarian figures control the army and police. Khalilzad warned this week in a statement clearly aimed at Shiite hard-liners that America would not continue to support institutions run by sectarian groups with links to armed militias.

    One top Shiite political leader accused Khalilzad of sharing blame for the attack on the shrine in Samarra.

    "These statements ... gave green lights to terrorist groups. And, therefore, he shares in part of the responsibility," said Abdul-Aziz al-Hakim, head of the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq and the former commander of its militia.

    The interior minister, who controls the security forces that Sunnis accuse of widepsread abuses, is a member of al-Hakim's party.

    The new tensions came as Iraq's various factions have been struggling to assemble a government after the Dec. 15 parliamentary elections.

    The Shiite fury sparked by Wednesday's bombings the third major attack against Shiite targets in as many days raised the likelihood that Shiite religious parties will reject U.S. demands to curb militias.

    The Askariya shrine, also known as the Golden Mosque, contains the tombs of two revered Shiite imams, who are considered by Shiites to be among the successors of the Prophet Muhammad.

    No group claimed responsibility for the 6:55 a.m. assault on the shrine in Samarra, a mostly Sunni Arab city 60 miles north of Baghdad, carried out by four insurgents disguised as police. But suspicion fell on Sunni extremist groups.

    The top of the dome, which was completed in 1905, collapsed into a crumbly mess, leaving just traces of gold showing through the rubble. Part of the shrine's tiled northern wall also was damaged.

    Thousands of demonstrators crowded near the wrecked shrine, and Iraqis picked through the debris, pulling out artifacts and copies of the Muslim holy book, the Quran, which they waved, along with Iraqi flags.

    "This criminal act aims at igniting civil strife," said Mahmoud al-Samarie, a 28-year-old builder. "We demand an investigation so that the criminals who did this be punished. If the government fails to do so, then we will take up arms and chase the people behind this attack."

    U.S. and Iraqi forces surrounded the Samarra shrine and searched nearby houses. About 500 soldiers were sent to Sunni neighborhoods in Baghdad to prevent clashes.

    On Al-Jazeera television, Sunni politician Adnan al-Dulaimi pledged that the violence would not discourage Sunnis from working to form a new government and claimed the Samarra attack was not planned by Sunni insurgents but "a foreign hand aiming to create differences among Iraqis."

    National Security Adviser Mouwafak al-Rubaie said 10 people were detained for questioning about the bombing. The Interior Ministry put the number at nine and said they included five guards.

    In the hours after the attack, more than 90 Sunni mosques were attacked with automatic rifles and rocket-propelled grenades, burned or taken over by Shiites, the Iraqi Islamic Party said.

    Large protests erupted in Shiite parts of Baghdad and in cities throughout the Shiite heartland to the south. In Basra, Shiite militants traded rifle and rocket-propelled grenade fire with guards at the office of the Iraqi Islamic Party. Smoke billowed from the building.

    Shiite protesters later set fire to a Sunni shrine containing the seventh century tomb of Talha bin Obeid-Allah, a companion of Muhammad, on the outskirts of Basra.

    Protesters in Najaf, Kut and Baghdad's Shiite slum of Sadr City also marched through the streets by the thousands, many shouting anti-American and anti-Israeli slogans and burning those nations' flags.

    Tradition says the Askariya shrine, which draws Shiite pilgrims from throughout the Islamic world, is near the place where the last of the 12 Shiite imams, Mohammed al-Mahdi, disappeared. Al-Mahdi was the son and grandson of the two imams buried in the Askariya shrine. Shiites believe he is still alive and will return to restore justice to humanity.



    Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. The information contained in the AP News report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press.


    Copyright 2006 Yahoo! Inc. All rights reserved.
    Questions or Comments
    Privacy Policy -Terms of Service - Copyright/IP Policy - Ad Feedback





    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    February 22, 2006
    Blast Destroys Shrine in Iraq, Setting Off Sectarian Fury
    By ROBERT F. WORTH
    BAGHDAD, Iraq, Feb. 22 A powerful explosion shattered the golden dome of one of Iraq's most revered Shiite shrines this morning, setting off a day of almost unparalleled sectarian fury in cities and towns across Iraq as protesting mobs took to the streets to chant for revenge and set fire to dozens of Sunni mosques.

    The bombing of the Golden Mosque in Samarra, 60 miles north of Baghdad, left its famous golden dome in ruins but injured no one, and only a handful of people appear to have been killed in the widespread street protests and violence that ensued.

    But the shrine has enormous significance for Shiites, and its destruction coming after two days of bloody attacks that left dozens of Shiite civilians dead ignited a nationwide outpouring of rage and panic that sharply underscored Iraq's sectarian divide.

    Shiite militia members flooded the streets of Baghdad, firing rocket-propelled grenades and machine guns at Sunni mosques as Iraqi Army soldiers called out to stop the violence stood helpless nearby. By the day's end, mobs had struck 27 Sunni mosques in the capital, killing three imams and kidnapping a fourth, Interior Ministry officials said.

    In the southern Shiite city of Basra, Shiite militia members destroyed at least two Sunni mosques, killing an imam, and launched an attack on the headquarters of Iraq's best-known Sunni Arab political party. In Samarra, thousands of people crowded the courtyard of the Golden Mosque, some weeping and kissing the stones, others angrily chanting "Our blood and souls we sacrifice for you imams!"

    President Bush issued a statement today extending his sympathy to Iraqis for the bombing.

    "The United States condemns this cowardly act in the strongest possible terms," Mr. Bush said in Washington. "I ask all Iraqis to exercise restraint in the wake of this tragedy, and to pursue justice in accordance with the laws and constitution of Iraq."

    All of Iraq's major political and religious leaders issued their own urgent appeals for restraint, and Prime Minister Ibrahim al Jaafari called for a three-day mourning period in a televised appearance. Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, Iraq's most senior Shiite cleric, released a statement in which he said, "If the government's security forces cannot provide the necessary protection, the believers will do it."

    The shrine bombing came after days of mounting violence aimed mostly at Shiite civilians, as Iraq's political leaders are struggling with little success to agree on the principles of a new national unity government. Insurgents have often struck during moments of political transition in the past, in apparent efforts to foment further conflict between Iraq's Shiite, Kurdish, and Sunni Arab political factions.

    Most Iraqi leaders attributed the attack to terrorists bent on exploiting sectarian rifts. But in a striking break from the past, the leader of Iraq's main Shiite political alliance said he thought Zalmay Khalilzad, the American ambassador to Iraq, was partly to blame for the bombing of the shrine.

    The Shiite leader, Abdul Aziz al Hakim, said he thought Mr. Khalilzad's public comments on Monday, in which he drew attention to apparent death squads operating within Iraq's Shiite-led Interior Ministry, were a provocation to the bombing. He did not explain how.

    "This declaration gave a green light for these groups to do their operation, so he is responsible for a part of that," Mr. Hakim said of the ambassador, at a news conference called to condemn the shrine bombing.

    The renegade Shiite cleric Muqtada al Sadr, whose Mahdi Army militia led many of the violent protests today, also placed some blame on what he called the "occupation forces" for the bombing, in comments to Al Jazeera Television. Mr. Sadr told the network he was cutting short a trip to Lebanon because of the shrine attack, and called on the new Iraqi Parliament, which includes 32 of his followers, to meet and vote on a request for coalition forces to leave Iraq.

    The attack in Samarra began at 7 a.m., when a group of a dozen men dressed in paramilitary uniforms entered the shrine and handcuffed four guards who were sleeping in a back room, said a spokesman for the provincial governor's office. The attackers then placed a bomb in the dome and detonated it, collapsing most of the dome and heavily damaging an adjoining wall.

    The shrine is one of four major Shiite shrines in Iraq, and two of the 12 imams revered by mainstream Shiites are buried in it: Ali al-Hadi, who died in 868 A.D., and his son, the 11th imam, Hassan al-Askari. According to legend, the 12th Imam, Muhammad al-Mahdi, went into hiding near the shrine, and Shiites believe he will return before the Day of Judgment to bring justice to a fallen world.

    No group claimed responsibility for the attack, but some Iraqi officials quickly pointed a finger at Al Qaeda in Mesopotamia, the jihadist group that is believed to be responsible for many of the attacks on Shiite civilians and mosques in the past two years.

    Samarra's population is mostly Sunni Arab, and it was a haven for insurgents until 2004, when American and Iraqi troops carried out a major operation to retake the city (and the Golden Mosque) from guerrilla fighters. But the insurgents have filtered back since then, and American troops in and around the city are now regularly attacked.

    Reporting for this article was contributed by Sabrina Tavernise, Mona Mahmoud, Khalid al Ansary, Omar al Neami, and Qais Mizher in Baghdad, and Iraqi employees of The New York Times in Basra, Kirkuk, Najaf, and Karbala.



    Copyright 2006The New York Times Company Home Privacy Policy Search Corrections XML Help Contact Us Work for Us Site Map Back to Top
    Boy you are proud of these. Posted in two threads.
    "If It Weren't For The United States Military"
    "There Would Be NO United States of America"
  7. #167  
    dESseRt, are you believing the hype that this is America's fault?
  8. #168  
    It is our fault in the sense that we uncorked the bottle with the genie. We had no business going in there and now all we will have to show for it is a Civil War, by tow groups of people who do not even know why they hate each other. This is exactly what Papa Bush said would happen when he was Prez and it is unfolding before our very eyes.

    Bush brought up the issue of Iraq, to change the subject that he could not find Osama. Now it all blew up in his face. Even if he had weapons of mass distruction, the UN should have dealth with it. Not us. he did not threaten us with them. We should have stayed out of it. In additon, even retired Sect. Powell claims he was forced into all of this. Take care, jay

    PS cardio, I am not proud that so many have died an dit is only going to get worse from here on out.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  9. #169  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert
    It is our fault in the sense that we uncorked the bottle with the genie.
    How? Did we bomb the golden mosque or did some scumbags do it?

    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert
    We had no business going in there and now all we will have to show for it is a Civil War, by tow groups of people who do not even know why they hate each other.
    Disagree on 'no business' and has a civil war began?

    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert
    This is exactly what Papa Bush said would happen when he was Prez and it is unfolding before our very eyes.
    Please cite, didn't know this.

    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert
    Even if he had weapons of mass distruction, the UN should have dealth with it.
    How much time should we have given the UN to address this? 10, 15 years? Don't you see? UN, collectively was never going to act. There were too many hands in the cookie jar (i.e. France, Russia, Germany)


    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert
    In additon, even retired Sect. Powell claims he was forced into all of this.
    Really?! Please cite.
  10. #170  
    Advance. Bush was warned by several experts including Powell that this was a very real likelyhood of removing the Bathist party. All of those people were pushed aside by the neo-con administration.

    So yes. By not heeding this advice, it is our fault.
  11. cardio's Avatar
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    #171  
    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas
    Advance. Bush was warned by several experts including Powell that this was a very real likelyhood of removing the Bathist party. All of those people were pushed aside by the neo-con administration.

    So yes. By not heeding this advice, it is our fault.
    In your opinion who's fault is it that

    "Christian youths burned the corpses of Muslims on Thursday on the streets of Onitsha in southeastern Nigeria, the city worst hit by religious riots that have killed at least 146 people across the country in five days."

    http://today.reuters.com/news/newsar...RIA.xml&rpc=22
    "If It Weren't For The United States Military"
    "There Would Be NO United States of America"
  12. #172  
    Dear advance, do a search for what Powells former aides have said in just the past few weeks. In addition, the aides say that powell has agreed to their airing this issue!
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  13. #173  
    Here is another problem with the GOP

    I found this as a link on FARK:

    This is from AMERICAblog:

    Thursday, February 23, 2006

    Top Bush/Rumsfeld aide claims furor over national security helps our "enemies"
    by Joe in DC - 2/23/2006 03:49:00 PM


    This is rich. It proves one more time that the Bush people will lie about everything. Bush has spent the past five years making Americans paranoid for purely political reasons. Now, apparently, if Americans do worry about national security, they are aiding the enemy according to our Deputy Defense Secretary Gordon England:
    If the furor over the port deal should go on, Mr. England said, it would give enemies of the United States aid and comfort: "They want us to become distrustful, they want us to become paranoid and isolationist."
    It was actually Karl Rove who wanted Americans to become distrustful. Bush and Rove used distrust and paranoia to their political advantage.


    my take on this:

    I will quote a from a comment to this blog entry as I feel the same as the person who wrote it:

    it is indeed weird how left is right and right is left on this subject. There is a general scrambling of everyone's position, we're in a hall of mirrors. Here Joe writes that "Bush has spent the past five years making Americans paranoid for purely political reasons. Now, apparently, if Americans do worry about national security, they are aiding the enemy". Bush has told you all for five years the sky is falling and now you're gonna get him for failing to hold up the sky. Nuts!

    BUSH WANTS IT BOTH WAYS AND TOO BAD IT DOESN'T WORK THAT WAY IN LIFE!
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  14. cardio's Avatar
    Posts
    779 Posts
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    787 Global Posts
    #174  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert
    Here is another problem with the GOP

    I found this as a link on FARK:

    This is from AMERICAblog:

    Thursday, February 23, 2006

    Top Bush/Rumsfeld aide claims furor over national security helps our "enemies"
    by Joe in DC - 2/23/2006 03:49:00 PM


    This is rich. It proves one more time that the Bush people will lie about everything. Bush has spent the past five years making Americans paranoid for purely political reasons. Now, apparently, if Americans do worry about national security, they are aiding the enemy according to our Deputy Defense Secretary Gordon England:
    If the furor over the port deal should go on, Mr. England said, it would give enemies of the United States aid and comfort: "They want us to become distrustful, they want us to become paranoid and isolationist."
    It was actually Karl Rove who wanted Americans to become distrustful. Bush and Rove used distrust and paranoia to their political advantage.


    my take on this:

    I will quote a from a comment to this blog entry as I feel the same as the person who wrote it:

    it is indeed weird how left is right and right is left on this subject. There is a general scrambling of everyone's position, we're in a hall of mirrors. Here Joe writes that "Bush has spent the past five years making Americans paranoid for purely political reasons. Now, apparently, if Americans do worry about national security, they are aiding the enemy". Bush has told you all for five years the sky is falling and now you're gonna get him for failing to hold up the sky. Nuts!

    BUSH WANTS IT BOTH WAYS AND TOO BAD IT DOESN'T WORK THAT WAY IN LIFE!
    Hey, I tend to get my news and form my opinons from blogs also.....NOT
    "If It Weren't For The United States Military"
    "There Would Be NO United States of America"
  15. #175  
    If American intelligence and other countries intelligence was pointing to Iraq as a threat prior to invading, then even knowing of alleged warnings from Powell (none provided or cited here yet) - Bush still made the right decisions based on the info he had at the time. Invading Iraq may have exacerbated the insurgency, but not invading would not have avoided it. It would have raised it's ugly head during Bush's term or in the near future. Bush is essentially doing the ugly work and getting no credit. It was going to be done sometime in our lifetime. Better now than later.

    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas
    Advance. Bush was warned by several experts including Powell that this was a very real likelyhood of removing the Bathist party. All of those people were pushed aside by the neo-con administration.

    So yes. By not heeding this advice, it is our fault.
  16. #176  
    Blogs are filled with truth, lies and emotions. I tend to stay away from the one's filled with lies and emotion. To quote another opinion from a blog that is so slanted is strange to say the least.

    Quote Originally Posted by cardio
    Hey, I tend to get my news and form my opinons from blogs also.....NOT
  17. #177  
    So far I think the quote is accuate!
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  18. cardio's Avatar
    Posts
    779 Posts
    Global Posts
    787 Global Posts
    #178  
    Hope he gets what he deserves

    Prosecutors call it a corruption case with no parallel in the long history of the U.S. Congress. And it keeps getting worse. Convicted Rep. Randall "Duke" Cunningham actually priced the illegal services he provided.

    http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/story?id=1667009&page=1

    Of course some will consider this a slanted story since my original link came from
    http://www.drudgereport.com/
    "If It Weren't For The United States Military"
    "There Would Be NO United States of America"
  19. #179  
    GOP governors say Bush's missteps hurting

    WASHINGTON -- Republican governors are openly worrying that the Bush administration's latest stumbles - from the natural disaster of Hurricane Katrina to those of its own making on prescription drugs and ports security - are taking an election-year toll on the party back home.

    The GOP governors reluctantly acknowledge that the series of gaffes threatens to undermine public confidence in President Bush's ability to provide security, which has long been his greatest strength among voters.

    "You've got solid conservatives coming up speaking like they haven't before, it's likely that something's going on at the grass roots," said Republican Mark Sanford of South Carolina. "Whether it's temporary or not remains to be seen."
    ------------------------------------------------

    Oh joy!
  20. #180  
    I read that as well...
    I'm so Great I'm jealous of myself!
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