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  1. AKC
    AKC is offline
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    #21  
    It took me twenty hours to get from houston to dallas . But I was entertained with my treo. At points on my route I text messaged watched mobitv and used pocket tunes in the small towns were there was no decent radio. But my wife and two kids are now safe with my parents in dallas phone worked occasionally and text messaging worked all the way. My treo kept me in contact with family and friends.
  2. mszatny's Avatar
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    #22  
    I'm in The Woodlands...about 30 miles North of downtown Houston. We are staying put and riding the storm out. Here is a view from an upstairs bedroom.

    WebCam

    MS
    <img src="http://users.netropolis.net/mszatny/pics/bevo.gif" border=0>
    The Woodlands, TX

    Palm Pro > PalmIII > Visor Prism w/Omnisky>SPCS Treo300 > SPCS Treo600 >
    SPCS Treo650 > CNG Treo650 > Copper Treo680 > ATT Treo750 WM6 > iPhone 3G
  3. cardio's Avatar
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    #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by mszatny
    I'm in The Woodlands...about 30 miles North of downtown Houston. We are staying put and riding the storm out. Here is a view from an upstairs bedroom.

    WebCam

    MS
    Webcam, bedroom ----- Nah, not going to go there. Seriously though, wishing you the best as this storm hits your area. Keep us updated if you are able to during and after the storm.
  4. #24  
    cool idea for the webcam. us people who never been thru a storm like this will know what its like if we watch that. gl to ya.
  5. Xochi's Avatar
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    #25  
    Definitely you should learn how to send SMSs (or whatever it's called on CDMA).

    The typical SMS message requires under 1KB of data total, whereas a voice call requires on the order of 1KB of data PER SECOND.

    There's a bunch of variables in play, but in theory, the network should be able to handle perhaps 10x to 100x as many SMSs as it can voice calls in any given period.

    Many folks don't know about short messaging, especially on CDMA systems, so you should try to educate those around you how to do it.
  6. #26  
    I moved a couple miles inland from central houston to spring (just south of where mszatny) is. I'll be at a friends house. It's kinda like a party. And of course the running joke is we'll have numerous Marga-rita-s.
    I'll try to post a few photos or something to flickr (http://www.flickr.com/photos/kwramsauer/) using my treo, so long as cell service holds. For what it's worth, I have had no problems getting both voice and data today.
  7. #27  
    Russell Holliman who does the "Treo Podcast" is podcasting some interesting information related to hurricane Rita. He lives in Houston. I really enjoy and reccomend his podcast. Check it out at http://mobilepodcast.org/
    Up the Creek.... Try the River!
    www.riverontheweb.com

    Moblog: bluefrog.textamerica.com
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by Xochi
    Definitely you should learn how to send SMSs (or whatever it's called on CDMA).
    ...

    Many folks don't know about short messaging, especially on CDMA systems, so you should try to educate those around you how to do it.
    Huh??? They're called SMS on CDMA too. It's not exactly a new concept.
    I'm back!
  9. mg48's Avatar
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    #29  
    I left Friendswood, which is between Housotn and Galveston, Wed at noon. Traffic was thick but moving. I was able to use blazer ot access the Houston realtime traffic flow maps to make realtime decisions. We made 150 mi in 5 hours. My wife and I watched MobiTV as we drove. It was supprising to me that even though Sprints towers had to be overwhelemed I was able to get the data through. We did suffer some buffering but I get that in Houston on a normal day. We also made a few phone calls without any problems.

    Thurs we repositioned from East TX ,where the storm is now heading, toward Austin. Traffic was much heavier on the major freeways. We stayed on the back roads and made it 200 mi in 5 hrs. Yahoo maps helped. Phone calls were very hard to make but text messages seemed to get through quickly to other Sprint phones and within minutes to other carriers. As I had heard from Katrina it looks like text gets though even when voice can't. I could not get a voice call through to a friend with Cinglular, but a text message went right through. It was very helpfull to get through to all my friends, co-workers, and family to let them know of my change of location. The Treo keyboard makes it much easier to to type and drive than a phone pad. I'm now in a house near Austin without internet. I am using PDAnet to stay connected.

    The Treo has proven to be well worth the cost and all the resets over the past year.
    Mike G

    Touch (Sprint)
  10. #30  
    Quote Originally Posted by riverbruce
    Russell Holliman who does the "Treo Podcast" is podcasting some interesting information related to hurricane Rita. He lives in Houston. I really enjoy and reccomend his podcast. Check it out at http://mobilepodcast.org/
    A group of Houston Podcasters will be streaming a live Shoutcast stream on hurricane Rita beginning at 3:00 PM Central. The stream is actually running now with a local newscast but at 3 there will be a live interactive stream to include Skype and IRC channel. You gotta love Pocket Tunes and it's streaming ability. Point your browser to http://www.houstonpodcasting.net

    Enjoy!
    Up the Creek.... Try the River!
    www.riverontheweb.com

    Moblog: bluefrog.textamerica.com
  11. #31  
    Appears like the storm appears to be weakening slightly and moving east of Galveston Bay, both good signs. Lets hope they hold!
  12. vw2002's Avatar
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    #32  
    good news that the storm is weakening, although its still trouble.

    why dont they open up BOTH sides of the highway for evacuation traffic rather than just the one side? for the amount of progress some people have made, they may as well have stayed home.

    i understand the authorities need use of the inbound lane to manage the situation, but gas is running out, people are stuck in dangerous areas - why not open the other side up and let them through? i mean, god sakes, time is running out!
  13. #33  
    Sounds like it's somewhat of a nightmare for the people trying to get out of the Houston area. Buses blowing up, stations out of gas along the highway, traffic moving only one mile per hour. Might have been better off staying home and riding it out.
    Make It Happen!!
    If you don't, who will?
  14. vw2002's Avatar
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    #34  
    Quote Originally Posted by treosixoo
    Sounds like it's somewhat of a nightmare for the people trying to get out of the Houston area. Buses blowing up, stations out of gas along the highway, traffic moving only one mile per hour. Might have been better off staying home and riding it out.
    yeah, this situation definitely makes you wonder, especially with the gas gouging going on, this stuff is just getting ridiculous
  15. cardio's Avatar
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    #35  
    Quote Originally Posted by vw2002
    yeah, this situation definitely makes you wonder, especially with the gas gouging going on, this stuff is just getting ridiculous
    I am always amazed that people decide to wait until the day before the storm is projected to make landfall before they realize it is time to evacuate.
    If the voluntary evacuations started on Tuesday people should have been on the move Tuesday. I know some can not leave at that point, but those that could have should have been out.
  16. naivete's Avatar
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    #36  
    They said a high pressure system moved into the area, which cools down the water, thereby weakened the hurricane. If high pressure stays, Rita may get downgrade further.
  17. vw2002's Avatar
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    #37  
    Quote Originally Posted by cardio
    I am always amazed that people decide to wait until the day before the storm is projected to make landfall before they realize it is time to evacuate.
    If the voluntary evacuations started on Tuesday people should have been on the move Tuesday. I know some can not leave at that point, but those that could have should have been out.
    yeah, i agree with you there. last minute moves DO make for the most chaos in situations like this.
  18. #38  
    Well, fortunately for the Houston area, this has turned out to be a non-event. I hope everyone east of the city have faired well, especially since 48 hours prior it was projected to hit hundreds of miles to the west.
  19. #39  
    I heard on the radio that shortly before landfall it dropped to a Cat 3 and within an hour of hitting ground it lost steam and dropped to a Cat 2. Good news for all.

    I think the evac was good as there is no way of knowing what Rita was going to for sure. The bad thing is that the same report shared that new breaches in the levies in NO burst and reflooded a lot of the city.
  20. #40  
    Hi T/Cers,

    I'm in Houston too, on the west side. I didn't have enough rain to give my car a decent washing off. It was kinda windy.... breezy??? Absolutely no damage for me, I didn't even lose power.

    The one thing a lot of people don't seem to understand is how many people were evacuating. I heard it said that never before had this situation occurred..... trying to evacuate 2 million people THROUGH a city of 4 million people.

    I had lots of people not in the area advising me to get out, as late as Friday. Why??? I was reasonably safe where I am, and I couldn't get to Austin on a tank of gas. So I'd rather be at home than stuck on the road outta gas.

    My only criticism of the officials organizing our efforts would be of the lack of response in getting tankers in to resupply the gas stations both in and out of Houston. It looks like things are getting back to normal but I saw people grabbing stuff off the shelves in HEB this morning. Geeeeeeez!!! You'da thought the hurricane was on its way again. I think this panic was responsible for the traffic conditions as well. People paniced and left when they didn't need to. The areas that should evacuate were broadcast around the clock. But because of Katrina so recently.....

    Perhaps we're just viewing human nature at its worst!!

    Vicki
    Safe and grateful
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