Page 53 of 71 FirstFirst ... 343484950515253545556575863 ... LastLast
Results 1,041 to 1,060 of 1405
  1. #1041  
    Quote Originally Posted by Joebar
    The BS part is that the blind Bush robots can't admit for a second that he has anything to do with the problem..

    35% of people polled think that junior and his people are doing a good or great job in responding to Katrina and her aftermath.

    This story (and others I'll try to post today) will have no effect on how they feel.



    How Reliable Is Brown's Resume?

    A TIME investigation reveals discrepancies in the FEMA chief's official biographies
    By DAREN FONDA AND RITA HEALY TIME Magazine
    Sep. 08, 2005

    When President Bush nominated Michael Brown to head the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in 2003, Brown's boss at the time, Joe Allbaugh, declared, "the President couldn't have chosen a better man to help...prepare and protect the nation." But how well was he prepared for the job? Since Hurricane Katrina, the FEMA director has come under heavy criticism for his performance and scrutiny of his background. Now, an investigation by TIME has found discrepancies in his online legal profile and official bio, including a description of Brown released by the White House at the time of his nomination in 2001 to the job as deputy chief of FEMA. (Brown became Director of FEMA, succeeding Allbaugh, in 2003.)

    Before joining FEMA, his only previous stint in emergency management, according to his bio posted on FEMA's website, was "serving as an assistant city manager with emergency services oversight." The White House press release from 2001 stated that Brown worked for the city of Edmond, Okla., from 1975 to 1978 "overseeing the emergency services division." In fact, according to Claudia Deakins, head of public relations for the city of Edmond, Brown was an "assistant to the city manager" from 1977 to 1980, not a manager himself, and had no authority over other employees. "The assistant is more like an intern," she told TIME. "Department heads did not report to him." Brown did do a good job at his humble position, however, according to his boss. "Yes. Mike Brown worked for me. He was my administrative assistant. He was a student at Central State University," recalls former city manager Bill Dashner. "Mike used to handle a lot of details. Every now and again I'd ask him to write me a speech. He was very loyal. He was always on time. He always had on a suit and a starched white shirt."...

    Brown's lack of experience in emergency management isn't the only apparent bit of padding on his resume, which raises questions about how rigorously the White House vetted him before putting him in charge of FEMA. Under the "honors and awards" section of his profile at FindLaw.com — which is information on the legal website provided by lawyers or their offices—he lists "Outstanding Political Science Professor, Central State University". However, Brown "wasn't a professor here, he was only a student here," says Charles Johnson, News Bureau Director in the University Relations office at the University of Central Oklahoma (formerly named Central State University). "He may have been an adjunct instructor," says Johnson, but that title is very different from that of "professor." Carl Reherman, a former political science professor at the University through the '70s and '80s, says that Brown "was not on the faculty." As for the honor of "Outstanding Political Science Professor," Johnson says, "I spoke with the department chair yesterday and he's not aware of it." Johnson could not confirm that Brown made the Dean's list or was an "Outstanding Political Science Senior," as is stated on his online profile.

    ...Brown states that from 1983 to the present he has been director of the Oklahoma Christian Home, a nursing home in Edmond. But an administrator with the Home, told TIME that Brown is "not a person that anyone here is familiar with." She says there was a board of directors until a couple of years ago, but she couldn't find anyone who recalled him being on it. According to FEMA's Andrews, Brown said "he's never claimed to be the director of the home. He was on the board of directors, or governors of the nursing home." However, a veteran employee at the center since 1981 says Brown "was never director here, was never on the board of directors, was never executive director. He was never here in any capacity. I never heard his name mentioned here."

    The FindLaw profile for Brown was amended on Thursday to remove a reference to his tenure at the International Arabian Horse Association,
    which has become a contested point....

    ...Stephen Jones, a prominent Oklahoma lawyer who was lead defense attorney on the Timothy McVeigh case, was Brown's boss for two-and-a-half years in the early '80s. "He did mainly transactional work, not litigation," says Jones. "There was a feeling that he was not serious and somewhat shallow." Jones says when his law firm split, Brown was one of two staffers who was let go.
    Last edited by BARYE; 09/09/2005 at 09:32 AM.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  2. cardio's Avatar
    Posts
    779 Posts
    Global Posts
    787 Global Posts
    #1042  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE
    35% of people polled think that junior and his people are doing a good or great job in responding to Katrina and her aftermath.

    This story (and others I'll try to post today) will have no effect on how they feel.



    How Reliable Is Brown's Resume?

    A TIME investigation reveals discrepancies in the FEMA chief's official biographies
    By DAREN FONDA AND RITA HEALY TIME Magazine
    Sep. 08, 2005

    When President Bush nominated Michael Brown to head the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in 2003, Brown's boss at the time, Joe Allbaugh, declared, "the President couldn't have chosen a better man to help...prepare and protect the nation." But how well was he prepared for the job? Since Hurricane Katrina, the FEMA director has come under heavy criticism for his performance and scrutiny of his background. Now, an investigation by TIME has found discrepancies in his online legal profile and official bio, including a description of Brown released by the White House at the time of his nomination in 2001 to the job as deputy chief of FEMA. (Brown became Director of FEMA, succeeding Allbaugh, in 2003.)

    Before joining FEMA, his only previous stint in emergency management, according to his bio posted on FEMA's website, was "serving as an assistant city manager with emergency services oversight." The White House press release from 2001 stated that Brown worked for the city of Edmond, Okla., from 1975 to 1978 "overseeing the emergency services division." In fact, according to Claudia Deakins, head of public relations for the city of Edmond, Brown was an "assistant to the city manager" from 1977 to 1980, not a manager himself, and had no authority over other employees. "The assistant is more like an intern," she told TIME. "Department heads did not report to him." Brown did do a good job at his humble position, however, according to his boss. "Yes. Mike Brown worked for me. He was my administrative assistant. He was a student at Central State University," recalls former city manager Bill Dashner. "Mike used to handle a lot of details. Every now and again I'd ask him to write me a speech. He was very loyal. He was always on time. He always had on a suit and a starched white shirt."...

    Brown's lack of experience in emergency management isn't the only apparent bit of padding on his resume, which raises questions about how rigorously the White House vetted him before putting him in charge of FEMA. Under the "honors and awards" section of his profile at FindLaw.com — which is information on the legal website provided by lawyers or their offices—he lists "Outstanding Political Science Professor, Central State University". However, Brown "wasn't a professor here, he was only a student here," says Charles Johnson, News Bureau Director in the University Relations office at the University of Central Oklahoma (formerly named Central State University). "He may have been an adjunct instructor," says Johnson, but that title is very different from that of "professor." Carl Reherman, a former political science professor at the University through the '70s and '80s, says that Brown "was not on the faculty." As for the honor of "Outstanding Political Science Professor," Johnson says, "I spoke with the department chair yesterday and he's not aware of it." Johnson could not confirm that Brown made the Dean's list or was an "Outstanding Political Science Senior," as is stated on his online profile.

    ...Brown states that from 1983 to the present he has been director of the Oklahoma Christian Home, a nursing home in Edmond. But an administrator with the Home, told TIME that Brown is "not a person that anyone here is familiar with." She says there was a board of directors until a couple of years ago, but she couldn't find anyone who recalled him being on it. According to FEMA's Andrews, Brown said "he's never claimed to be the director of the home. He was on the board of directors, or governors of the nursing home." However, a veteran employee at the center since 1981 says Brown "was never director here, was never on the board of directors, was never executive director. He was never here in any capacity. I never heard his name mentioned here."

    The FindLaw profile for Brown was amended on Thursday to remove a reference to his tenure at the International Arabian Horse Association,
    which has become a contested point....

    ...Stephen Jones, a prominent Oklahoma lawyer who was lead defense attorney on the Timothy McVeigh case, was Brown's boss for two-and-a-half years in the early '80s. "He did mainly transactional work, not litigation," says Jones. "There was a feeling that he was not serious and somewhat shallow." Jones says when his law firm split, Brown was one of two staffers who was let go.
    You forgot to post the quote from Senator Lieberman. It went something like this His (Brown's) experience will be invaluable. I will see if I can find it again and post for your

    (edit) here is the quote "Indeed, Democratic Sen. Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut, who led those hearings, called Brown's long-ago stint as assistant city manager in Edmond, Okla., a "particularly useful experience" because he had responsibility for local emergency services"

    .http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9244682/
  3. #1044  
    I throw this out for consideration, advocating nothing in particular (though I agree that Houston is a good place, I'll go no further).

    "It is now no surprise that Houston is the place where in days they built a new city in and around the Astrodome, that has taken in 25,000 refugees from New Orleans, and is planning to feed, house, employ, and relocate most of them. Houston is the place where the heads of all the religious groups in the city--Baptists and Catholics, Muslims and Jews--came together to raise $4.4 million to feed the evacuees for 30 days, and to supply 720 volunteers a day to prepare and serve meals. If New Orleans was where the Third World broke through, Houston was where the First World began beating it back, and asserting its primacy. Are we surprised that the star of this show has been Texas, home of Karl Rove and both Bushes, widely despised by the glitterati as sub-literate, biased, oppressive, and retrograde? No."
    http://www.joelkotkin.com/Commentary...ity%20Tale.htm
  4. cardio's Avatar
    Posts
    779 Posts
    Global Posts
    787 Global Posts
    #1045  
    Quote Originally Posted by KRamsauer
    I throw this out for consideration, advocating nothing in particular (though I agree that Houston is a good place, I'll go no further).

    "It is now no surprise that Houston is the place where in days they built a new city in and around the Astrodome, that has taken in 25,000 refugees from New Orleans, and is planning to feed, house, employ, and relocate most of them. Houston is the place where the heads of all the religious groups in the city--Baptists and Catholics, Muslims and Jews--came together to raise $4.4 million to feed the evacuees for 30 days, and to supply 720 volunteers a day to prepare and serve meals. If New Orleans was where the Third World broke through, Houston was where the First World began beating it back, and asserting its primacy. Are we surprised that the star of this show has been Texas, home of Karl Rove and both Bushes, widely despised by the glitterati as sub-literate, biased, oppressive, and retrograde? No."
    http://www.joelkotkin.com/Commentary...ity%20Tale.htm
    I congratulate Houston and the entire state of Texas for the outstanding example they have set for the rest of us. Hats off to you
  5. #1046  
    Quote Originally Posted by Joebar
    Of course they are, they all are, I thought I've said that before....

    The BS part is that the blind Bush robots can't admit for a second that he has anything to do with the problem..
    Joe,

    I'm no Bush robot, you won't find me defending or attacking him...

    But what did he have to do with the problem? What actions or inactions did he take/not take to make Katrina and its aftermath worse? Just looking for specifics, not poking fingers.
    Last edited by AlaskanDad; 09/09/2005 at 10:32 AM.
    Recognizing that I volunteered...
  6. #1047  
    Quote Originally Posted by KRamsauer
    I throw this out for consideration, advocating nothing in particular (though I agree that Houston is a good place, I'll go no further).

    "It is now no surprise that Houston is the place where in days they built a new city in and around the Astrodome, that has taken in 25,000 refugees from New Orleans, and is planning to feed, house, employ, and relocate most of them. Houston is the place where the heads of all the religious groups in the city--Baptists and Catholics, Muslims and Jews--came together to raise $4.4 million to feed the evacuees for 30 days, and to supply 720 volunteers a day to prepare and serve meals. If New Orleans was where the Third World broke through, Houston was where the First World began beating it back, and asserting its primacy. Are we surprised that the star of this show has been Texas, home of Karl Rove and both Bushes, widely despised by the glitterati as sub-literate, biased, oppressive, and retrograde? No."
    http://www.joelkotkin.com/Commentary...ity%20Tale.htm

    there's lots of room down there in Crawford -- and in Kennybunkport -- maybe they can spread out some from Houston....
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  7. #1048  
    Quote Originally Posted by clulup
    True, you could not have prevented the hurricane from hitting New Orleans. But the hurricane was not the main problem. Things were quite ok on Monday after the hurricane had left, the real problem for NO was the levees breaking.

    The US would have been more than rich enough to secure the levees in time (during the last years/decades). Maybe you put too much emphasis on praying and too little in engineering? The two are not mutally exclusive of course, but while the effectiveness of praying is somewhat open, the US Army Corps of Engineers wrote that the levees could have been secured for hurricanes such as Katrina with US$ 2 billion.
    As I stated, I have not been following the thread closely before now. So, I did a quick search. I found 2 references to "pray" and 3 to "praying" (one of which was in your reply). I do recall seeing posts indicating that the levees could have been upgraded. But, what is the reference to praying for the levees about?
  8. #1049  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE
    there's lots of room down there in Crawford -- and in Kennybunkport -- maybe they can spread out some from Houston....
    Protesters have that space reserved
  9. #1050  
    Seriously, though, TX does have a lot of space. It is good to see the resources that are relatively nearby being used as such.
  10. #1051  
    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskanDad
    Joe,

    I'm no Bush robot, you won't find me defending or attacking him...

    But did he have to do with the problem. What actions or inactions did he take/not take to make Katrina and its aftermath worse? Just looking for specifics, not poking fingers.

    maybe if junior had not appointed political hacks and incompetent liars to lead the agency that protects america from disasters ... maybe that would have made a small difference in how everything played out ??

    Leaders Lacking Disaster Experience

    'Brain Drain' At Agency Cited

    By Spencer S. Hsu Washington Post
    Friday, September 9, 2005; A01

    Five of eight top Federal Emergency Management Agency officials came to their posts with virtually no experience in handling disasters and now lead an agency whose ranks of seasoned crisis managers have thinned dramatically since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

    FEMA's top three leaders -- Director Michael D. Brown, Chief of Staff Patrick J. Rhode and Deputy Chief of Staff Brooks D. Altshuler -- arrived with ties to President Bush's 2000 campaign or to the White House advance operation, according to the agency. Two other senior operational jobs are filled by a former Republican lieutenant governor of Nebraska and a U.S. Chamber of Commerce official who was once a political operative.

    Meanwhile, veterans such as U.S. hurricane specialist Eric Tolbert and World Trade Center disaster managers Laurence W. Zensinger and Bruce P. Baughman -- who led FEMA's offices of response, recovery and preparedness, respectively -- have left since 2003...

    ... three of the five FEMA chiefs for natural-disaster-related operations and nine of 10 regional directors are working in an acting capacity, agency officials said...

    "FEMA requires strong leadership and experience because state and local governments rely on them," said Trina Sheets, executive director of the National Emergency Management Association. "When you don't have trained, qualified people in those positions, the program suffers as a whole."...

    ...scorching criticism has been aimed at FEMA, and it starts at the top with Brown, who has admitted to errors in responding to Hurricane Katrina and the flooding in New Orleans. The Oklahoma native, 50, was hired to the agency after a rocky tenure as commissioner of a horse sporting group by former FEMA director Joe M. Allbaugh, the 2000 Bush campaign manager and a college friend of Brown's.

    Rhode, Brown's chief of staff, is a former television reporter who came to Washington as advance deputy director for Bush's Austin-based 2000 campaign and then the White House....

    ...Altshuler is a former presidential advance man. His predecessor, Scott Morris, was a media strategist for Bush ...

    ...Vice President Cheney also defended FEMA leaders, saying, "We're always trying to strike the right balance" between political appointees and "career professionals that fill the jobs underneath them."

    But experts inside and out of government said a "brain drain" of experienced disaster hands throughout the agency, hastened in part by the appointment of leaders without backgrounds in emergency management, has weakened the agency's ability to respond to natural disasters. Some security experts and congressional critics say the exodus was fueled by a bureaucratic reshuffling in Washington in 2003, when FEMA was stripped of its independent Cabinet-level status and folded into the Department of Homeland Security.

    ...FEMA "has gone downhill within the department, drained of resources and leadership," said I.M. "Mac" Destler, a professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy. "The crippling of FEMA was one important reason why it failed."

    ...The agency's troubles are no secret. The Partnership for Public Service, a nonprofit group that promotes careers in federal government, ranked FEMA last of 28 agencies studied in 2003...
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  11. #1052  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE
    there's lots of room down there in Crawford -- and in Kennybunkport -- maybe they can spread out some from Houston....
    "Room" has never been an issue. If "room" were all that is required, Alaska could hold a lot of people...
  12. #1053  
    Quote Originally Posted by shopharim
    Protesters have that space reserved

    I believe that there's lots of space available there now.

    The Gold Star Mom's have I think, begun a bus trip that will eventually follow junior back to his primary vacation home, the one here in Washington
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  13. #1054  
    Quote Originally Posted by shopharim
    Seriously, though, TX does have a lot of space. It is good to see the resources that are relatively nearby being used as such.
    I don't know how long this is going to go on (these things have a way of turning ugly after a while) but as of right now, I can say the city of Houston feels honored to be able to help. It's not a sense of superiority, but of duty. Remember, the reason Houston is what it is, is that a hurricane wiped out the (much larger) city of Galveston. We know (at least in our "collective" memory) what it means to go through this.
  14. #1055  
    Quote Originally Posted by shopharim
    As I stated, I have not been following the thread closely before now. So, I did a quick search. I found 2 references to "pray" and 3 to "praying" (one of which was in your reply). I do recall seeing posts indicating that the levees could have been upgraded. But, what is the reference to praying for the levees about?
    I think he is an Atheist and feels he is knocking only conservatives by making fun of religion. I am a conservative christian and enjoy the company of many democrat religious friends.
  15. cardio's Avatar
    Posts
    779 Posts
    Global Posts
    787 Global Posts
    #1056  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE
    maybe if junior had not appointed political hacks and incompetent liars to lead the agency that protects america from disasters ... maybe that would have made a small difference in how everything played out ??

    Leaders Lacking Disaster Experience

    'Brain Drain' At Agency Cited

    By Spencer S. Hsu Washington Post
    Friday, September 9, 2005; A01

    Five of eight top Federal Emergency Management Agency officials came to their posts with virtually no experience in handling disasters and now lead an agency whose ranks of seasoned crisis managers have thinned dramatically since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

    FEMA's top three leaders -- Director Michael D. Brown, Chief of Staff Patrick J. Rhode and Deputy Chief of Staff Brooks D. Altshuler -- arrived with ties to President Bush's 2000 campaign or to the White House advance operation, according to the agency. Two other senior operational jobs are filled by a former Republican lieutenant governor of Nebraska and a U.S. Chamber of Commerce official who was once a political operative.

    Meanwhile, veterans such as U.S. hurricane specialist Eric Tolbert and World Trade Center disaster managers Laurence W. Zensinger and Bruce P. Baughman -- who led FEMA's offices of response, recovery and preparedness, respectively -- have left since 2003...

    ... three of the five FEMA chiefs for natural-disaster-related operations and nine of 10 regional directors are working in an acting capacity, agency officials said...

    "FEMA requires strong leadership and experience because state and local governments rely on them," said Trina Sheets, executive director of the National Emergency Management Association. "When you don't have trained, qualified people in those positions, the program suffers as a whole."...

    ...scorching criticism has been aimed at FEMA, and it starts at the top with Brown, who has admitted to errors in responding to Hurricane Katrina and the flooding in New Orleans. The Oklahoma native, 50, was hired to the agency after a rocky tenure as commissioner of a horse sporting group by former FEMA director Joe M. Allbaugh, the 2000 Bush campaign manager and a college friend of Brown's.

    Rhode, Brown's chief of staff, is a former television reporter who came to Washington as advance deputy director for Bush's Austin-based 2000 campaign and then the White House....

    ...Altshuler is a former presidential advance man. His predecessor, Scott Morris, was a media strategist for Bush ...

    ...Vice President Cheney also defended FEMA leaders, saying, "We're always trying to strike the right balance" between political appointees and "career professionals that fill the jobs underneath them."

    But experts inside and out of government said a "brain drain" of experienced disaster hands throughout the agency, hastened in part by the appointment of leaders without backgrounds in emergency management, has weakened the agency's ability to respond to natural disasters. Some security experts and congressional critics say the exodus was fueled by a bureaucratic reshuffling in Washington in 2003, when FEMA was stripped of its independent Cabinet-level status and folded into the Department of Homeland Security.

    ...FEMA "has gone downhill within the department, drained of resources and leadership," said I.M. "Mac" Destler, a professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy. "The crippling of FEMA was one important reason why it failed."

    ...The agency's troubles are no secret. The Partnership for Public Service, a nonprofit group that promotes careers in federal government, ranked FEMA last of 28 agencies studied in 2003...
    You do realize that the senate confirmed appointees don't you. Why does everyone thing that the President has this dictatorship type authority where he can just put someone in a position and be done with it? Our system is one of checks and balances, believe it or not both rebublican and democratic senators agreed on the appointment. I am not saying or implying in any way he was or is the right person for the job, but there is no one person to blame.
  16. cardio's Avatar
    Posts
    779 Posts
    Global Posts
    787 Global Posts
    #1057  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE
    I believe that there's lots of space available there now.

    The Gold Star Mom's have I think, begun a bus trip that will eventually follow junior back to his primary vacation home, the one here in Washington
    I heard you have already set up your spare room for them
  17. #1058  
    Quote Originally Posted by KRamsauer
    I don't know how long this is going to go on (these things have a way of turning ugly after a while) but as of right now, I can say the city of Houston feels honored to be able to help. It's not a sense of superiority, but of duty. Remember, the reason Houston is what it is, is that a hurricane wiped out the (much larger) city of Galveston. We know (at least in our "collective" memory) what it means to go through this.
    Honestly, I've never really looked up to Texas cause I've always felt Texans have had a superiority complex. I've thrown that mentality out the window. What Texas has done is absolutely amazing. The cities of Houston, San Antonio and Dallas have taken these folks in without regard to the ramifications down the road with housing, impact on social services, etc. My hat is off to the Great State of Texas!
  18. #1059  
    Quote Originally Posted by cardio
    You do realize that the senate confirmed appointees don't you.
    Stop wrecking his arguement! lol

    They don't want to hear this. Any federal employee is the direct responsibility of the President (only if they do bad, if they do good then the President had nothing to do with it.)
  19. #1060  
    Quote Originally Posted by KRamsauer
    I don't know how long this is going to go on (these things have a way of turning ugly after a while) but as of right now, I can say the city of Houston feels honored to be able to help. It's not a sense of superiority, but of duty. Remember, the reason Houston is what it is, is that a hurricane wiped out the (much larger) city of Galveston. We know (at least in our "collective" memory) what it means to go through this.
    (Galveston) probably our country's worst disaster until now --

    and both made immeasurably worse by people whose responsibility it was to protect citizens in the event of a catastrophe like this...
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)

Posting Permissions